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Tagged: Opportunity

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Legal education, opportunity, and bottlenecks

Joseph Fishkin’s Bottlenecks offers a new theory of equal opportunity. (See symposium posts here and here.)

What does it mean for legal education?

One of the major contributions of the book is to offer a new social justice perspective from which to evaluate a wide variety of laws and policies, both public and private. The book invites us all to treat opportunity not just as a catch phrase, but really deeply explore its meaning and ramifications.

If we reform legal education not only to attract more students but also to promote social justice, how should we think about legal education’s role in the broader opportunity structure?

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Bottlenecks: The book we all should be reading

Let me start with a confession: I am an unlikely contributor to this symposium.

Bottlenecks: A New Theory of Equal Opportunity, by Joseph Fishkin

Bottlenecks is fundamentally a work of legal philosophy, offering as the subtitle promises, “a new theory of equal opportunity.” The book lays out a new way of thinking about both the purposes and the structure of social opportunity, exploring in depth the implications of this theory for thinking about topics such as class, work, education, gender, anti-discrimination law, and equality as a constitutional value.

I don’t write about any of those things. Maybe you don’t either. So what are we both doing here?

My goal in this post is to convince you that both you and I very much belong in this conversation, because with Bottlenecks, Joey has penned that rare book that can inform projects in fields as diverse as IP (my own) and immigration, bankruptcy and business organizations, family law and criminal law. If there one book of 2014 that I can plausibly claim should be read by everyone in law and public policy, this would be that book.

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