Category: Technology

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With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

In a sentence, Anupam Chander’s The Electronic Silk Road contains the good, the bad and the ugly of the modern interconnected and globalized world.

How many times do we use terms like “network” and “global”? In Professor Chander’s book you may find not only the meanings, but also the possible legal, economical and ethical implications that these terms may include today.

It’s well known that we are facing a revolution, despite of recent Bill Gates’ words that “The internet is not going to save the world”. I partly agree with Mr. Gates. Probably the internet will not save the world, but for sure it has already changed the world as we know it, making possible the opportunities that are well described in The Electronic Silk Road.

However, I would like to use my spot in this Symposium not to write about the wonders of the Trade 2.0, but to share some concerns that , as a privacy scholar, I have.

The problem is well known and is connected to the risk of the big data companies, that base their business model on consumer-profiling for selling advertisement or additional services to the companies.

“[T]he more the network provider knows about you, the more it can earn” writes Chander, and as noted by V. Mayer-Schönberger and K. Cukier in their recent book Big Data, the risks that could be related with the “dark side” of the big data are not just about the privacy of individuals, but also about the processing of those data, with the “possibility of using big data predictions about people to judge and punish them even before they’ve acted.”.

This is, probably, the good and the bad of big data companies as modern caravans of the electronic silk road: they bring a lot of information, and the information can be used, or better processed, for so many different purposes that we can’t imagine what will happen tomorrow, and not only the risk of a global surveillance is around the corner (on this topic I suggest to read the great post by D. K. Citron and D. Gray Addressing the Harm of Total Surveillance: A Reply to Professor Neil Richards), but also the risk of a dictatorship of data.

This possible circumstance, as Professor Solove write in the book Nothing To Hide “[…] not only frustate the individual by creating a sense of helpness and powerlessness, they also affect social structure by altering the kind of relationships people have with the institutions that make important decisions about their lives.”

Thus, I guess that the privacy and data protection ground could be the real challenge for the electronic silk road.

Professor Chander’s book is full of examples about the misuse of data (see the Paragraph Yahoo! in China), the problem of protection of sensitive data shared across the world (see the Paragraph Boston Brahmins and Bangalore Doctors), the problem about users’ privacy posed by social networks (see Chapter 5 Facebookistan).

But Professor Chander was able also to see the possible benefits of big data analysis (see the Paragraph Predictions and Predilections), for example in healthcare, thus is important to find a way to regulate the unstoppable flowing of data across the world.

In a so complex debate about a right that is subject to different senses and definitions across the world (what is “privacy” or “personal data” is different between USA, Canada, Europe and China for example), I find very interesting the recipe suggested by Anupam Chander.

First of all, we have to embrace some ground principles that are good both for providers and for law and policy makers: 1) do no evil; 2) technology is neutral; 3) the cyberspace need a dematerialized architecture.

Using these principles, it will be easy to follow Professor Chander’s fundamental rule: “harmonization where possible, glocalization where necessary”.

A practical implementation of this rule, as described in Chapter 8, will satisfy the different view of data privacy in a highly liberal regimes and in a highly repressive regime, pushing the glocalization (global services adapt to local rules) against the deregulation in the highly liberal regimes and the “do no evil” principle against the oppression in the highly repressive regime.

This seems reasonable to me, and at the end of my “journey” in Professor Chander’s book, I want to thank him for giving us some fascinating, but above all usable, theories for the forthcoming international cyberlaw.

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Global Legal Pluralism

I remember back in 2003, Anupam Chander and I both took part in a cyberlaw retreat on Cape Cod sponsored by Harvard Law School’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society.  Most of the professors assembled at the retreat were concerned with how to “solve” the problems that local regulation of internet activity might pose.  In contrast, Anupam Chander and I repeatedly made the case that this was not a problem to be solved, but an inevitable expression of cultural diversity.  Further, we argued that there might even be some benefits that could accrue from such legal pluralism, properly managed.

We have been fellow travellers ever since, and I am very pleased to see Anupam’s project finally come to fruition in this lively and agile book.  As befits a broadly synthetic work about the electronic silk road, Anupam stiches together an impressive array of examples that convincingly demonstrate the importance of the global trade in services.  In addition, turning from the descriptive to the normative, he lays out principles that might undergird a governance regime for this cross-border activity that leaves open the possibility for multiple competing normative voices.

Anupam’s approach is one that is consonant with the conception of global legal pluralism I have been pursuing for over a decade, and so I have few objections to his account.  Quite rightly, Anupam steers a useful middle ground on issues of so-called extraterritorial regulation.  He neither says that local regulation should always trump all other possible normative authorities (as sovereigntist territorialists often do), nor does he call for a full universal harmonization scheme.  Instead, he adopts a pithy aphorism: “harmonize where possible and glocalize where necessary.”  The key here is that a decisionmaker in a cross-border dispute should always ask whether it is possible to defer to another legal regime in the interests of a harmonious interlocking transnational legal system.  Even asking such a question can, over time, inculcate habits of mind that cause decision-makers to be restrained about reflexively applying their own law in all circumstances.  At the same time, Anupam recognizes that there will be instances when such deference is impossible and local populations will feel the need to impose local norms on cross-border activity.  In such cases, he asks global services companies to “glocalize”: customize their global services product to conform to the law of various localities.

My guess is that such an approach will be workable in many cases, and so Anupam’s argument is an advance.  It is also usefully pluralist in that it leaves space for multiple communities—local international, and transnational—to assert normative authority.  This is in marked contrast to an approach that seeks to elide normative difference and tries to impose a single authoritative set of norms.  Thus, I fully embrace his project.

I do have two quibbles, however.

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On the NSA and Media Bias: An Extended Analysis

By Albert Wong and Valerie Belair-Gagnon, Information Society Project at Yale Law School

In a recent article in the Columbia Journalism Review, we reported that major US newspapers exhibited a net pro-surveillance bias in their “post-Edward Snowden” coverage of the NSA. Our results ran counter to the general perception that major media outlets lean “traditionally liberal” on social issues. Given our findings, we decided to extend our analysis to see if the same bias was present in “traditionally conservative” and international newspapers.

Using the same methods described in our previous study, we examined total press coverage in the Washington Times, one of the top “traditionally conservative” newspapers in the US. We found that the Washington Times used pro-surveillance terms such as security or counterterrorism 45.5% more frequently than anti-surveillance terms like liberty or rights. This is comparable to USA Today‘s 36% bias and quantitatively greater than The New York Times‘ 14.1% or the Washington Post‘s 11.1%. The Washington Times, a “traditionally conservative” newspaper, had the same, if not stronger, pro-surveillance bias in its coverage as neutral/”traditionally liberal”-leaning newspapers.

In contrast, The Guardian, the major UK newspaper where Glenn Greenwald has reported most of Snowden’s disclosures, did not exhibit such a bias. Unlike any of the US newspapers we examined, The Guardian actually used anti-surveillance terms slightly (3.2%) more frequently than pro-surveillance terms. Despite the UK government’s pro-surveillance position (similar to and perhaps even more uncompromising than that of the US government), the Guardian‘s coverage has remained neutral overall. (Neutral as far as keyword frequency analysis goes, anyway; the use of other methods, such as qualitative analysis of article tone, may also be helpful in building a comprehensive picture.)

Our extended results provide additional context for our earlier report and demonstrate that our analysis is “capturing a meaningful divide.”

On a further note, as several commenters suggested in response to our original report, the US media’s pro-surveillance bias may be a manifestation of a broader “pro-state” bias. This theory may be correct, but it would be difficult to confirm conclusively. On many, even most, issues, the US government does not speak with one voice. Whose position should be taken as the “state” position? The opinion of the President? The Speaker of the House? The Chief Justice? Administration allies in Congress? In the context of the Affordable Care Act, is there no “pro-state” position at all, since the President, the Speaker, and the Chief Justice each have different, largely irreconcilable views?

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Will We Be Ever Able To Go Off-grid Again? And Other Questions about the Electronic Silk Road

Will we ever be able to go off-grid again? What do we gain and lose if not? These questions came to mind as I was reading Anupam Chander’s Electronic Silk Road. The book is excellent. Indeed, these questions and the rest of this post’s ideas would not have come to mind had he not set out how the Electronic Silk Road operates and might operate. And my questions are perhaps prompted by a good book that addresses much and better still opens the doors to the next questions. Chander makes a strong case for benefits of a modern silk road where trust and trade work together and promote “net-work” which he defines as “information services delivered remotely through electronic communications systems.” This two way world facilitates labor shifted to Asia but also Google and Facebook spanning the globe with their services. His plea for new laws to address this change in trade makes sense. Our world of goods is fading to a world of digital things. Yet I wonder whether this new rule of trade maps to all the wonders we may want.

There may be unintentional irony here. Chapter One epigraph quotes Keynes “What an extraordinary episode in the economic progress of man that age was which came to an end in August, 1914!” Does trade stop war or at least make countries less likely to war against each other? Maybe. To get there Chander points out that, “the characteristics that permit net-work trade might be deployed to create a robust infrastructure for such trade: real-time information transfer, low information and other transactions costs, the ability of individuals around the world to collaborate, and electronic identification.” But the same systems that may promote trade can lead to greater surveillance and repression.

In other words, the recent spying amongst countries may be a good thing. I fear greater coordination amongst countries rather than friction. Chander calls this issue “Stalinization—the imposition of the world’s most repressive rules on cyberspace, in aggregated form.” He acknowledges this point at p. 197. Nonetheless this greater connection and improved grid may be inescapable. The idea that local laws must balance global over-reach does not appear to address what happens when the big boys agree. The electronic silk road thus seems to kill the romance of the silk road.

The Silk Road evokes adventure, the ability to test, change identities, and yet somehow trade worked. Failure on the Silk Road or even mistakes or cheating could be hidden by moving from the Road to some other country. In that sense, a modern system of trade on a global scale seems to defeat the room for play that Julie Cohen has described in Configuring the Networked Self. To where would one go to experiment, reinvent, and rehabilitate? Even with greater freedom to communicate things can go awry. A WTO response may be futile if all agree on bad behavior. Public shaming of corporations may mean little when they are forced to comply. To be clear, I agree with much of what Chander offers and have hope that the mitigation he offers will take it root. At bottom it may be a faith that discourse and debate defeats evil in all forms. Part of me thinks this idea is true. Part wonders whether we have come that far from the days leading up to World War I or II. If not, tighter understanding and trade may do less than both Chander and I hope. Then again Chander may be setting us up for the next step in his ideas. I certainly hope so.

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Introducing the Electronic Silk Road Online Symposium

Silk Road coverThis week, a great group will be blogging about Professor Anupam Chander’s book, The Electronic Silk Road: How the Web Binds the World Together in Commerce. Professor Chander is a leading scholar on globalization and digitization. He is Director of the California International Law Center and Martin Luther King, Jr. Hall Research Scholar at UC Davis. He has been a visiting professor at Yale Law School, the University of Chicago Law School, Stanford Law School, and Cornell Law School. He is also a dear friend. Nonetheless, it is time for us to do what we hope to do well, and if lucky, our friends do for us. That is, it is time to press Professor Chander about his work as it tries to show us how the new Silk Road operates, what it promises, what is yields, and what it threatens. Work and services are now blending, if not blended. Old rules for trade struggle to adapt to new rules for information. Where will we go from here? Join Professor Chander and our panelists including Paul Berman, Miriam Cherry, Graeme Dinwoodie, Nicklas Lundblad, Frank Pasquale, Pierluigi Perri, Adam Thierer, Haochen Sun, Fred Tung, and of course Danielle Citron and me for the fun this week.

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Heads Up 3D Printing and more: The Georgetown Law Journal Volume 102 Symposium: “Law in an Age of Disruptive Technology”

Folks,

As you know Gerard and I have been working up our paper Patents, Meet Napster: 3D Printing and the Digitization of Things . It will be part of The Georgetown Law Journal Volume 102 Symposium: “Law in an Age of Disruptive Technology” which will take place on Friday November 8, 2013. There will be panels about driverless cars and mass surveillance as well. We hope to see many of you there. (RSVP at this link).

It is a great honor to be part of this lineup:

Keynote Address by Professor Neal Katyal

3-D Printing
Chaired by Professors Deven Desai and Gerard Magliocca

Driverless Cars & Tort Liability
Chaired by Professor Bryant Walker Smith

Mass Surveillance Technology
Chaired by Professor Christopher Slobogin

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Announcing Symposium on Orly Lobel’s Talent Wants to be Free: Why We Should Learn to Love Leaks, Raids, and Free Riding

Talent Wants to be FreeThink you have enough to read? Think again! I am honored to announce that Concurring Opinions will host a symposium on Orly Lobel’s book, Talent Wants to be Free: Why We Should Learn to Love Leaks, Raids, and Free Riding. The event will run from Monday, November 11 to Friday, November 15. I came to know Professor Lobel’s work as I shared some of my thoughts on intellectual property, property theory, and technologically mediated creation in her seminar, Work, Welfare, and Justice, in 2008. I was thinking about who owns your email? What about work place creation? Who owns what you come up with at work? Does it matter whether you used company technology to create and learn? Professor Lobel was digging into related questions, and it has been a blast seeing her run with them. Now we have the pleasure of her book. The accolades have been coming in from academics in law and other fields as well as the business world. Business Week, Fortune, and Harvard Business Review have run articles by Professor Lobel that draw on the insights from the book.

Professor Lobel argues that as we move deeper into a world driven by human capital and talent is in increasing demand, we have to understand that a lock-down approach to innovation is a losing strategy. Nonetheless:

Many companies embrace a control mentality—relying more on patents, copyright, branding, espionage, and aggressive restrictions of their own talent and secrets than on creative energies that are waiting to be unleashed.

Unlocking talent, setting it free as she puts it, sets up a system where everyone wins. Will our discussants or you agree? I think so, but I am sure there will be new ideas and challenges during the event. Our panelists include Professor Lobel as well as:

Matt Bodie

Anupam Chander

Danielle Citron

Catherine Fisk

Vic Fleischer

Brett Frischmann

Shubha Ghosh

Ron Gilson

Peter Lee

Frank Pasquale

Awards for High-Impact, Federally Funded Research

In a world where attacks on inquiry are all too common, it’s nice to see great research recognized. The Golden Goose Awards are a forum for such encomia, focusing on federally funded research:

The purpose of the Golden Goose Award is to demonstrate the human and economic benefits of federally funded research by highlighting examples of seemingly obscure or unusual studies that have led to major breakthroughs and have had a significant impact on society. Such breakthroughs may include development of life-saving medicines and treatments; game-changing social and behavioral insights; and major technological advances related to national security, energy, the environment, communications, and public health.

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Upcoming Online Symposium on Professor Anupam Chander’s The Electronic Silk Road

Silk Road coverDanielle and I are happy to announce that next week, Concurring Opinions will host an online symposium on Professor Anupam Chander’s The Electronic Silk Road: How the Web Binds the World Together in Commerce. Professor Chander is a professor at U.C. Davis’s King Hall School of Law. Senators, academics, trade representatives, and pundits laud the book for its clarity and the argument Professor Chander makes. He examines how the law can facilitate commerce by reducing trade barriers but argues that consumer interests need not be sacrificed:

On the ancient Silk Road, treasure-laden caravans made their arduous way through deserts and mountain passes, establishing trade between Asia and the civilizations of Europe and the Mediterranean. Today’s electronic Silk Roads ferry information across continents, enabling individuals and corporations anywhere to provide or receive services without obtaining a visa. But the legal infrastructure for such trade is yet rudimentary and uncertain. If an event in cyberspace occurs at once everywhere and nowhere, what law applies? How can consumers be protected when engaging with companies across the world?

But will the book hold up under our panel’s scrutiny? I think so but only after some probing and dialogue.

Our Panelists include Professor Chander as well as:

Paul Berman

Miriam Cherry

Graeme Dinwoodie

Nicklas Lundblad

Frank Pasquale

Pierluigi Perri

Adam Thierer

Haochen Sun

Fred Tung

And of course

Danielle Citron and I will be there too.

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MMM 3D Printing: It’s magic! But may need some help from the law

As Gerard noted, we have posted our draft of our paper “Patents, Meet Napster: 3D Printing and the Digitization of Things. The area is much fun. Along the way, claims about maybe possible became, oh they’re doing that? OK. Fix the draft and cite. Guns, compounding chemicals, low-temperature metals, oh my. The technology has moved and continues to move in many different ways. The paper has some doctrine, some science and technology studies, and some just plain old wow that’s wild technology. We are excited for the symposium at Georgetown, and we have time to edit and develop. We would love feedback about the legal implications and the technology.

Here’s the abstract perhaps to whet your appetite:

Abstract:
Digitization has reached things. This shift promises to alter the business and legal landscape for a range of industries. Digitization has already disrupted copyright-based industries and laws. As cost barriers dropped, individuals engaged with copyrighted work as never before. The business-to-business models of industrial copyright faltered and in some cases failed. Industries had to reorganize, and claimed foundations for copyright had to be re-examined. This Article examines a prime example the next phase of digitization: 3D printing and it implications on intellectual property law and practice.

3D printing is a general-purpose technology that will do for physical objects what MP3 files did for music. The core patent bargain—sharing the plans on how to make something in exchange for exclusivity—may be meaningless in a world of digitized things. While these devices will unleash the creativity of producers and reduce costs for consumers, they will also make it far easier to infringe patents, copyrights, and trade dress. This will force firms to rethink their business practices and courts to reexamine not only patent doctrine but also long established doctrine in areas ranging from copyright merger to trademark post-sale confusion. Moreover, Congress will need to consider establishing some sort of infringement exemption for 3D printing in the home and expanding the notice-and takedown provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to websites that host software enabling the 3D printing of patented items and distinctive trade dress. While a 3D printer is not yet a common household item, the time to start thinking about that future is now.