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Category: Law Rev (UCLA)

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 56:1 (October 2008)

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 56:1 (October 2008).

Melville B. Nimmer Memorial Lecture

Geoffrey R. Stone, The World of the Framers: A Christian Nation?, 56 UCLA L. Rev. 1 (2008).

Articles

Adam M. Gershowitz, The iPhone Meets the Fourth Amendment, 56 UCLA L. Rev. 27 (2008).

Marco J. Jimenez, The Value of a Promise: A Utilitarian Approach to Contract Law Remedies, 56 UCLA L. Rev. 59 (2008).

Sean B. Seymore, Heightened Enablement in the Unpredictable Arts, 56 UCLA L. Rev. 127 (2008).

Comments

Erin J. Cox, Freeing Exercise at Expression’s Expense: When RFRA Privileges the Religiously Motivated Speaker, 56 UCLA L. Rev. 169 (2008).

Adam I. Kaplan, The Case for Comparative Fault in Compensating the Wrongfully Convicted, 56 UCLA L. Rev. 227 (2008).

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:6 (August 2008)

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:6 (August 2008).

Articles

Ann E. Carlson, Implementing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Caps: A Case Study of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1479 (2008).

Daniel A. Farber, The Place-Based Theory of Standing, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1505 (2008).

Sean B. Hecht, Climate Change and the Transformation of Risk: Insurance Matters, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1559 (2008).

Douglas A. Kysar & Bernadette A. Meyler, Like a Nation State, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1621 (2008).

Cass R. Sunstein, The World vs. the United States and China? The Complex Climate Change Incentives of the Leading Greenhouse Gas Emitters, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1675 (2008).

Michael P. Vandenbergh, Jack Barkenbus & Jonathan Gilligan, Individual Carbon Emissions: The Low-Hanging Fruit, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1701 (2008).

Michael Wara, Measuring the Clean Development Mechanism’s Performance and Potential, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1759 (2008).

Jonathan B. Wiener, Climate Change Policy and Policy Change in China, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1805 (2008).

Jonathan Zasloff, The Judicial Carbon Tax: Reconstructing Public Nuisance and Climate Change, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1827 (2008).

Comments

Alina Ball, An Imperative Redefinition of “Community”: Incorporating Reentry Lawyers to Increase the Efficacy of Community Economic Development Initiatives, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1883 (2008).

Maureen Carroll, Educating Expelled Students After No Child Left Behind: Mending an Incentive Structure That Discourages Alternative Education and Reinstatment, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1909 (2008).

Amy Riley Lucas, Specialty License Plates: The First Amendment and the Intersection of Government Speech and Public Forum Doctrines, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1971 (2008).

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:5 (June 2008)

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:5 (June 2008).

Articles

Michelle Wilde Anderson, Cities Inside Out: Race, Poverty, and Exclusion at the Urban Fringe, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1095 (2008).

Jennifer Gordon & R.A. Lenhardt, Rethinking Work and Citizenship, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1161 (2008).

Ronald J. Krotoszynski, Jr. & Clint A. Carpenter, The Return of Seditious Libel, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1239 (2008).

Adam J. Levitin, Priceless? The Economic Costs of Credit Card Merchant Restraints, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1321 (2008).

Essay

Michael L. Kramer & Michael N. Schmitt, Lawyers on Horseback? Thoughts on Judge Advocates and Civil-Military Relations, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1407 (2008).

Comments

Richard J. Hawkins, Substantially Modifying the Visual Artists Rights Act: A Copyright Proposal for Interpreting the Act’s Prejudicial Modification Clause, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1437 (2008).

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:4 (April 2008)

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:4 (April 2008).

Articles

Josh Bowers, Contraindicated Drug Courts, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 783 (2008).

Noah Sachs, Beyond the Liability Wall: Strengthening Tort Remedies in International Environmental Law, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 837 (2008).

Joanna M. Shepherd, Tort Reforms’ Winners and Losers: The Competing Effects of Care and Activity Levels, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 905 (2008).

John G. Sprankling, Owning the Center of the Earth, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 979 (2008).

Comments

Megan Roberts, The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act: Why Considering Individuals One at a Time Creates Untenable Situations for Students and Educators, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1041 (2008).

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:3 (February 2008)

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:3 (February 2008).

Articles

Stephen M. Bainbridge, The Convergence of Good Faith and Oversight, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 559 (2008).

Kamal Ghali, No Slavery Except as a Punishment for Crime: The Punishment Clause and Sexual Slavery, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 607 (2008).

Caleb E. Mason, An Aesthetic Defense of the Nonprecedential Opinion: The Easy Cases Debate in the Wake of the 2007 Amendments to the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 643 (2008).

Comments

Malinda Lee, Reorienting the Debate on Presidential Signing Statements: The Need for Transparency in the President’s Constitutional Objections, Reservations, and Assertions of Power, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 705 (2008).

Nancy Olson, Does Practice Make Perfect? An Examination of Congress’s Proposed District Court Patent Pilot Program, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 745 (2008).

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:2 (December, 2007)

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:2 (December 2007).

Articles

Alejandro E. Camacho, Can Regulation Evolve? Lessons From a Study in Maladaptive Management, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 293 (2007).

Susan P. Crawford, The Internet and the Project of Communications Law, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 359 (2007).

Renée McDonald Hutchins, Tied Up in Knotts? GPS Technology and the Fourth Amendment, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 409 (2007).

Comments

Jordan Berman, Overworking the Presumption of Sanity: Clark’s Use of Mental Disease Evidence to Negate Mens Rea, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 467 (2007).

Ross Naughton, State Statutes Limiting the Dual Sovereignty Doctrine: Tools for Tribes to Reclaim Criminal Jurisdiction Stripped by Public Law 280?, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 489 (2007).

Kristen A. Williams, Employing Ex-Offenders: Shifting the Evaluation of Workplace Risks and Opportunities From Employers to Corrections, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 521 (2007).

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UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:1 (October 2007)

UCLA-logo.jpg

UCLA Law Review, Issue 55:1 (October 2007).

Melville B. Nimmer Memorial Lecture

William W. Fisher III, When Should We Permit Differential Pricing of Information?, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 1 (2007).

Articles

Jill E. Fisch, Does Analyst Independence Sell Investors Short?, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 39 (2007).

Kenneth L. Karst, The Liberties of Equal Citizens: Groups and the Due Process Clause, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 99 (2007).

Peter S. Menell & David Nimmer, Legal Realism in Action: Indirect Copyright Liability’s Continuing Tort Framework and Sony’s De Facto Demise, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 143 (2007).

Comments

Richard J. Hawkins, Dysfunctional Equivalence: The New Approach to Defining “Postal Channels” Under the Hague Service Convention, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 205 (2007).

Vanessa A. Lavely, The Path to Recognition of Same-Sex Marriage: Reconciling the Inconsistencies Between Marriage and Adoption Cases, 55 UCLA L. Rev. 247 (2007).

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Announcing the Law Review Table of Contents Project

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I’m pleased to announce a new feature at Concurring Opinions – the Law Review Table of Contents Project. We have invited a number of the top law reviews to post the table of contents to their new issues and to provide links to the articles if they are posted on the law review’s website.

The goal of the Table of Contents Project is to provide you with a useful research tool. Finding out about the latest law review publications can be difficult. If you’re like me, you rarely read the physical issues of law reviews anymore; and you don’t have time to constantly keep checking each law review’s website to see if a new issue has been published. Now you don’t have to. Just keep reading Concurring Opinions, and information about the latest law review scholarship will be brought to you – all in one place!

Each journal’s tables of contents will be archived in two categories: (1) a category called Law Rev Contents – collecting all the law review table of contents postings; and (2) a category for each specific law review.

Participating law reviews thus far include:

* Boston College

* Chicago

* Columbia

* Cornell

* Duke

* Emory

* Fordham

* Georgetown

* GW

* Harvard

* Indiana

* Michigan

* Minnesota

* NYU

* Northwestern

* Notre Dame

* Southern California

* Stanford

* Texas

* UCLA

* Vanderbilt

* Virginia

* Washington University

* Yale

We still have a bunch of open invitations, so we anticipate that the number of participants will grow. Unfortunately, we cannot include all law reviews, as this will overwhelm the regular content of our blog.

We hope that you find this new feature to be helpful. We’re very excited about it here, as we believe that this will be of great use to keep you informed about new legal scholarship.

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Announcing the Law Review Forum Project

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I am very pleased to announce a new project here at Concurring Opinions – the Law Review Forum Project. We will be hosting online forums for several law reviews. Increasingly, law reviews are creating online forums as companions to their regular law review issues. These forums contain very short response pieces, essays, debates, and other works that attempt to bridge the gap between regular legal scholarship and the blogosphere.

Journals seeking to create their own online forum face two daunting challenges. First, they must create and actively maintain a web presence. Second, they must find ways to attract readers, which is difficult in an age where so many blogs and other websites exist. A wide readership for a website depends upon having daily content. Law review forums produce content sporadically throughout the year at intervals that are not regular enough to attract a significant readership.

Therefore, we have invited a number of law reviews to participate in a partnership with our blog. Throughout the year, each law review will periodically post forum essays here at Concurring Opinions. We are not requiring an exclusive license, so participating law reviews can also cross-post at their own websites.

We see this as a mutually-beneficial arrangement. We can bring great content to our blog, and law reviews can reach our significant audience without the pressures of having to build and maintain an online readership or of having to produce content with regularity.

Law reviews currently with and without existing forums will be participating. Thus far, the following law reviews have agreed to participate:

* Harvard Law Review

* Virginia Law Review

* Michigan Law Review

* University of Pennsylvania Law Review

* Northwestern Law Review

* UCLA Law Review

* George Washington Law Review

In the near future, we hope to be expanding the list of participating law reviews.