Category: Law Rev (Stanford)

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Stanford Law Review Online: The Drone as Privacy Catalyst

Stanford Law Review

The Stanford Law Review Online has just published a piece by M. Ryan Calo discussing the privacy implications of drone use within the United States. In The Drone as Privacy Catalyst, Calo argues that domestic use of drones for surveillance will go forward largely unimpeded by current privacy law, but that the “visceral jolt” caused by witnessing these drones hovering above our cities might serve as a catalyst and finally “drag privacy law into the twenty-first century.”

Calo writes:

In short, drones like those in widespread military use today will tomorrow be used by police, scientists, newspapers, hobbyists, and others here at home. And privacy law will not have much to say about it. Privacy advocates will. As with previous emerging technologies, advocates will argue that drones threaten our dwindling individual and collective privacy. But unlike the debates of recent decades, I think these arguments will gain serious traction among courts, regulators, and the general public.

Read the full article, The Drone as Privacy Catalyst by M. Ryan Calo, at the Stanford Law Review Online.

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 62:5 (May 2010)

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 62:5 (May 2010)


ARTICLES
The Subjects of the Constitution
Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz
1209
The Pleading Problem Adam Steinman 1293

ESSAY
Dispatch from the Supreme Court Archives: Vagrancy, Abortion, and What Links Between Them Reveal About the History of Fundamental Rights
Risa L. Goluboff 1361

NOTES
Modern Threats and the United Nations Security Council: No Time for Complacency (A Response to Professor Allen Weiner)
Alexander Benard & Paul J. Leaf 1395
Risk, Everyday Institutions, and the Institutional Value of Tort Law
Govind C. Persad 1445
“No Taxation Without Representation” in the American Woman Suffrage Movement Juliana Tutt 1473
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Stanford Law Review, Issue 62:4 (April 2010)

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 62:4 (April 2010)


ARTICLES
Mapped Out of Local Democracy
Michelle Wilde Anderson
931
Applying the Fourth Amendment to the Internet: A General Approach Orin S. Kerr 1005
The Substance of False Confessions
Brandon L. Garrett 1051
Through a Scanner Darkly: Functional Neuroimaging as Evidence of Criminal Defendant’s Past Mental States Teneille Brown & Emily Murphy 1119
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Stanford Law Review, Issue 62:3 (March 2010)

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 62:3 (March 2010)


ARTICLES
Did Liberal Justices Invent the Standing Doctrine? An Empirical Study of the Evolution of Standing, 1921-2006
Daniel E. Ho & Erica L. Ross
591
All Hands on Deck: Local Governments and the Potential for Bidirectional Climate Change Regulation Katherine A. Trisolini 669
Judicial Independence, Autonomy, and the Bankruptcy Courts
Troy A. McKenzie 747
Measuring the Success of Bivens Litigation and Its Consequences for the Individual Liability Model Alexander A. Reinert 809

NOTE

 

The Hand-Off Procedure or the New Silver Platter: How Today’s Police Are Serving Up Potentially Tainted Evidence Without Even Revealing the Search that Produced It to Defendants or to Courts Micah G. Block 863

COMMENT

 

The New Rule 12(b)(6): Twombly, Iqbal, and the Paradox of Pleading Rakesh N. Kilaru 905
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Stanford Law Review, Issue 62:2 (January 2010)

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 62:2 (January 2010)


ARTICLES
Deep Secrecy
David E. Pozen
257
Commercializing Patents Ted Sichelman 341
Irrelevant Confusion
Mark A. Lemley & Mark McKenna 413
The Disintegration of Intellectual Property? A Classical Liberal Response to a Premature Obituary Richard A. Epstein 455


NOTE

An Empirical Analysis of Section 1983 Qualified Immunity Actions and Implications of Pearson v. Callahan
Greg Sobolski & Matt Steinberg 523


COMMENT

Fourth Amendment Remedial Equilibration: A Comment on Herring v. United States and Pearson v. Callahan
David B. Owens 523
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Stanford Law Review, Issue 62:1 (December 2009)

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 62:1 (December 2009)

ARTICLES

Promoting Civil Rights Through Proactive Policing Reform
Rachel A. Harmon
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The Democracy Canon Richard L. Hasen 69
Delaware’s Shrinking Half-Life
Mark J. Roe 125
Breaking the Law to Enforce It: Undercover Police Participation in Crime Elizabeth E. Joh 155
Nonlethal Self-Defense, (Almost Entirely) Nonlethal Weapons, and the Rights to Keep and Bear Arms and Defend Life
Eugene Volokh 199


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Stanford Law Review, Issue 61:6 (April 2009)

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 61:6 (April 2009)

SYMPOSIUM: MEDIA, JUSTICE, AND THE LAW

Introduction

ARTICLES

Investigating the ‘CSI Effect’ Effect: Media and Litigation Crisis in Criminal Law

Simon A. Cole & Rachel Dioso-Villa

Criminal Madness: Cultural Iconography and Insanity

Russell D. Covey

Virtue and Vice: Who Will Report on the Failings of the Criminal Justice System?

William R. Montross & Patrick Mulvaney

Racing the Closet

Russell K. Robinson

NOTE

Ex Parte Blogging: The Legal Ethics of Supreme Court Advocacy in the Internet Era

Rachel C. Lee

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 61:5 (March 2009)

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 61:5 (March 2009)

ARTICLES

Jurisdiction’s Noble Lie

Frederic M. Bloom

The Injustice of Appearance

Deborah L. Rhode

Private Immigration Screening in the Workplace

Stephen Lee

The Law, Culture, and Economics of Fashion

C. Scott Hemphill & Jeannie Suk

RESPONSE

The Piracy Paradox Revisited

Kal Raustiala & Christopher Sprigman

REPLY

Remix and Cultural Production

C. Scott Hemphill & Jeannie Suk

NOTES

Pleading Sovereign Immunity: The Doctrinal Underpinnings of Hans v. Louisiana and Ex Parte Young

Sina Kian

Who May Be Tried Under the Military Commissions Act of 2006?

Michael Montaño

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 61:3 (December 2008)

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Stanford Law Review, Issue 61:3 (December 2008)

ARTICLES

The Functions of Standing

Heather Elliott

The Myth of the Generalist Judge

Edward K. Cheng

Soft Law: Lessons from Congressional Practice

Jacob E. Gersen & Eric A. Posner

Legislative Threats

Guy Halfteck

NOTES

Punitive Damages, Remunerated Research, and the Legal Profession

Shireen A. Barday

The Right of Confrontation, Ongoing Emergencies, and the Violent-Perpetrator-at-Large Problem

Scott G. Stewart