Category: Just for Fun

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Knee Defender, Barro’s error, and Surprise Norms

Being a believer in Coase’s irrelevance “theorem” (see corresponding CALI lesson by me), I bring you a peeve springing from a podcast’s discussion of knee defender (a product that prevents the airline seat in front of you from reclining, which led to a recent fight on a plane, the plane’s diverted landing, and the arrest of the fighting passengers), which referenced a pundit’s (Barro‘s) quip that since nobody has offered to bribe him not to recline, little demand for no reclining exists. The podcast was also critical of reclining generally (as it is of warning motorists about speed traps), which raises the issue of hidden, surprise norms.

First on Coase. Bribing someone not to do something that annoys you is completely counterintuitive and counterproductive. It sounds and feels like extortion and perhaps we have an innate intuition against extortion. Maybe a jurisdiction existed, in the history of human development, where it was acceptable and habitual for some to pay others not to engage in annoying activities. However, nobody lives there any more because it got too annoying, since this functioned as an incentive for annoying behavior. How do we get from this point (my anti-extortion exception to acceptable Coasean bargaining) to worlds where ranchers bargain with farmers or quiescent spas with percussionists? I think social interaction follows the golden rule of do unto others as you would have done unto you (I accept gradual moderate reclining especially while napping and am very thankful indeed for speed trap warnings) and polite counterrequests not to recline are easy and possible (and we luckily have judges to protect us against oversensitive cops). Farmer-rancher and spa-percussionist interactions are different in that they happen at the professional level. Ranchers and farmers do not know eachother’s cost-benefit calculus making bargaining acceptable, as I think it is between neighbors with different attitudes about noise or lawn care. That having been said, my sense is that airline seat design seems to be sensitive to the various concerns because it seems to have shifted to minimal reclining in short flights or cramped rows and more reclining in transoceanic flights, where, also, the flight attendants do ask passengers to lift their seats for meals. So, anti-reclining demand seems to be producing results, consistent with Coasean reasoning and contrary to the intuition of Barro. Notice the unusual power of Coase here, since two of his conditions, the clarity of rights and enforceability of bargains, seem to be lacking in the social context of seat reclining (but not in neighborhood lawn care? Or is that why people pay a premium to live in associations? Coase all the way! Is it Lee Fennell or Jay Weiser who discuss premiums paid for association houses? Maybe both.). Perhaps I am wrong on reclining and it is clearly a right, not only because the button is on the handrest of the recliner (rather than the seat back, as the podcast points out) but also and especially since the airlines have banned knee-defender. The airlines also offer some seats with protection against reclining, the bulkhead and the exit row seats (maybe airlines could increase the number of non-reclined-against seats or charge the knee-defender premium for them). Thus, those seeking no reclining can obtain it by taking such seats instead of bribing Barro, buying knee defender, or trying to create a norm against it.

Second on surprise norms. No no no no, thou shalt not spring your righteous surprise norms on me. Western legal and social arrangement rests on the foundation that what is not prohibited is allowed. I can press my recline button and I can blink my brights to oncoming motorists at the cost of flying next to crying babies and driving behind those doing under the speed limit. (But in Sunday’s NY Times magazine, in Branson’s interview, he mentioned that he wants or tried to have his airline move toward children’s cabins, a development for which my ears are praying albeit from behind BOSE noise-cancelling headphones). To my reasoning, a necessary corollary of the rule of law is the non-rule of non-legal norms. When a need for a rule has enough thrust that it alters the law, then we have some warning about it and perhaps the chance to object against its creation. Holding people to a standard of conduct they do not know and to which they may object seems the height of (righteous, meddlesome, antiliberal, puritanical, strike four words) unfairness. (BTW, strike is obsolete litigator legalese for delete, dating from the days where the transcriber would back up the typewriter carriage and type XXXX or dashes over the, thus, struck text. That I could perfectly easily delete the words reveals my affectation here, but ignore that.) I have a sense that when I lived in the east coast a lot more of these surprise norms seemed to exist than here in the midwest and it grated. Or I am a rude boor who belongs in that extinct society above.

So, what is the norm in this blogo-podcast-sphere? Should I reveal that I am commenting on Oral Argument of Joe Miller and Christian Turner or should I leave the podcast nameless because I criticize it somewhat? Since law professors thrive on citation counts, I will presume that they would prefer attribution to marginalization despite that I am not in full agreement with everything they say (and who could possibly expect complete agreement in our milieu of professional debaters of trivialities?). I am very thankful for their podcast adding interest to my driving time and for triggering this post.

I hope no norm against run-on sentences and parentheticals exists in the blogosphere, or I am toast! In my defense, please notice that I could not instead drop notes. BTW, drop a [foot]note is legalese for removing from the main text a diversion or interjection and placing it in a footnote, which reminds me…

Now you can insist on control of your material. You can insist on veto power over everything; down to casting and choice of directors and script approval, you can insist on all those things. J.K. Rowling insisted on all those things. And J.K. Rowling got all those things because there were enough people interested in that. Now if you’re not J.K. Rowling, and you insist on all those things, the studios are not going to be very interested or less studios will be interested in it so you’ll get less money or none at all. Or alternatively, you can not insist on everything and you can just sell them the book and what they do with it is what they do with it and you have to live with it. You no longer have approval over anything, you no longer have…you know what I mean? And those are the two extremes. In between of course there’s a vast area of shades of gray.

— George R. R Martin

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George R. R. Martin on Copyright, Inheritance, and Creative Control

He cares much more about French dynastic history than you do.

He cares much more about French dynastic history than you do.

This is Part 3 of the interview I did with George R. R. Martin in  2007.  For background and part 1, click here.  For Part 2, click here. For the audio file, click here.

HOFFMAN: Yeah, but you just generally right. The trope something that really speaks to folks. I guess maybe that raises a question about your fans generally. You’ve obviously got a huge fan base and I’ve been reading a little bit about them. One question that comes up a bunch of different times is fan fiction and what do you think about fan fiction?

MARTIN: I’m opposed to fan fiction.

HOFFMAN: Why?

MARTIN: Well number one, its copyright infringement and it can potentially endanger my copyrights and my trademarks if I were to allow it. Also, yes maybe it’s a gesture of love that they love your characters and they love your world and all that but it’s not the kind of gesture of love that I really want. And for aspiring writers and some of these people, sure it’s a wide range of fan fiction writers, some who are terrible. Some of them are actually talented writers. I think for the talented writers it’s particularly tragic because they should be doing their own material.

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I’m looking to tell a story here and hopefully an entertaining and engrossing story. I’m not looking to do a study of socioeconomic systems or legal systems or any of these things so the really scholarly works, copious footnotes, and things like that, are less useful to me in some ways.

— George R. R. Martin

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The Law of the Game of Thrones

Game-of-Thrones-game-of-thrones-17629189-1280-720In 2007, I did an interview with GRRM as a part of CoOp’s then vibrant “Law and Hard Fantasy” series.  (Yes, I know I’ve let it drop for half-a-decade, but new interviews are now coming out.)

Given the new-found fame of the Game of Thrones, I decided to have the interview transcribed for those of you who don’t want to listen.  Thanks to Temple’s Danielle Pinol who did the work.  I’m going to provide the transcript in three parts.  Here’s part I, about the roots of sovereign power in Westeros.  Part II talks about lawyers and magic. Part III will talk about fantasy literature more generally.

 

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All fiction to some degree takes place in an invented world, with invented people doing unreal things. In a way the upside down definition may be the most useful - fantasy is books published by fantasy imprints and shelved in the fantasy sections. As far as what content makes a book a fantasy book rather than general fiction, it varies with the reader. I guess you know it when you see it. Although magic swords are often a giveaway.

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Law and Hard Fantasy Interview Series: Joe Abercrombie

joe_abercrombieThis post is a part of our ongoing interview series with fantasy authors who generally write in the burgeoning genre of gritty / hard / dark epic fantasy.   The series began with this book review post, and continued with interviews of George R. R. Martin and Patrick Rothfuss, and Mark Lawrence.

Today, I’m interviewing Joe Abercrombie.  Joe is the author, most famously, of the “First Law” trilogy, and some more recent spin-offs set in that world.  Joe’s writing is characterized by dark (very, very dark) humor, grit (as in dirt), and an unhealthy amount of revenge.  He’s on twitter, he has a blog, and he was nice enough to agree to answer some questions from me about his writing and its relationship to law.

DH: There’s been a lot of talk in recent years about the collapse of the “fantasy” and “fiction” categories. Is there anything useful about the distinction? If so, what are the minimal characteristics of books that would stay on your fantasy shelf?

JA: Any question about definitions and categorisations is always a complicated one, with lots of confusions and blurry areas. All fiction to some degree takes place in an invented world, with invented people doing unreal things. In a way the upside down definition may be the most useful – fantasy is books published by fantasy imprints and shelved in the fantasy sections. As far as what content makes a book a fantasy book rather than general fiction, it varies with the reader. I guess you know it when you see it. Although magic swords are often a giveaway.

DH: One marker of the trend toward harder / darker fantasy is more fulsome world-building and world-planning. But you are well-known as a guy who hates maps (recent books excepted!) Here’s a practical question: do you sit down and think about the rules of the world before you start to write, or do you start writing and work them out as you go along?

JA: I don’t know that I’d necessarily agree with your first assertion, there. I think a marker of the trend towards harder/darker fantasy is a greater focus on character and internal life over setting and world building, certainly I see that as key in what I’m doing. But you want the backdrop to be consistent and coherent. So you have some ideas about the rules of the world. Certainly you have some strong ideas about the effect certain cultures will have on the way the characters think. That’s the kind of world building I’m most interested in, I suppose you could say, the kind that has a direct effect on the behaviour of the characters, rather than the kind that specifies exactly how many thousand years the tower of Zarb had guarded Dragonfire Pass.

DH: What do you have against maps anyway?

JA: I love maps. I have loads of them. But I don’t necessarily want to share them with the reader. I want the reader to see the action in close up, not wide shot. I want them to be with the characters, not thinking so much about the setting.

DH: Is there any civil law in your world? By that, I mean a system by which contractual breaches and torts are enforced outside of blood feuds, deeds are recorded, property disputes disposed of? What does that system look like?

JA: It depends a little on the culture. In the North there has been a relatively primitive tradition of ownership by clans, judgement by elders and chieftains, but it’s broken down during a period of sustained warfare and a new king has tried to impose a new and much more centralised system, with varying success. The Union, by contrast, has a well-established aristocracy and a complex and extensive centralising bureaucracy, although with a weak king on the throne and a lot of pressure from external threats it’s become rather a corrupt system, prone to being carved into personal fiefdoms by powerful and charismatic individuals in the government. Hardly surprising, in a way, since the whole thing has been explicitly designed to allow one man (Bayaz) to maintain control. The whole thing’s further distorted by the conflict between old power and new money, as the Union has spread to include more diverse cultures and the merchant class has gained in influence.

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I’ve heard people say books are getting more ‘gritty’, meaning more violent and less stylised in general. The realism there might be in terms of warrior not shrugging off their wounds and being fine the next day etc. Researched realism and detailed city/country mechanics are not something I was aware of a movement toward. To me nothing is added by, for example, the author working out a grain distribution network. I’m interested in story and character, not mechanics.

— Mark L.

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Law and Hard Fantasy Interview Series: Mark Lawrence

Broken-EmpireI’ve sporadically run an interview series with fantasy authors who generally write in the burgeoning genre of gritty / hard / dark epic fantasy.  (I’m, obviously, a fan.)  The series began with this book review post, and continued with interviews of George R. R. Martin and Patrick Rothfuss.  The series continues today as I interview Mark Lawrence.  Mark is the author of the Broken Empire trilogy, and the forthcoming Red Queen’s War.  His work has been lauded on both sides of the Atlantic (Mark was raised in the U.K., where he works as a research scientist).  He was gracious enough to respond to my email queries, which follow after the jump.

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Some Holiday Music a la Middle Earth

I rather liked the way the trailer (or preview) for the first past of The Hobbit used Misty Mountains Cold. The movie, well, more than enough has been said about that. I looked for the song, as it seemed appropriate for this time of year. It turns out several groups have covered it. And this one to get you started seems to agree that it fits the time of year. It is from the 2012 Holiday Concert at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar.

Consolation for Those who Write Too Much

From an interview with Cynthia Ozick:

[In the early 50s an aspiring novelist] tried out teaching for a while after college—–as a teaching assistant on a stipend—–and then fled homeward to begin the novel. Mine, typically, was immensely ambitious. I thought of it as a “philosophical” novel, and was going to pit the liberal-modernists against the neo-Thomists. I wrote about 300,000 words of it.

Those were the days!

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Aspirations to Write Better

Yes, more from Hemingway. I am reading others as well and may share from those if so moved. For now I will say that few have what he describes here. I will say it can be developed. And I will say I am most grateful to two people who have read my work, shredded it, but did so with love. Love here was the willingness to take the work on its terms and dig and hack and purge. That is why I think the skill can be learned or rediscovered if lost. I will not name them here. I have told them. Anything else is gossip and name-dropping. That would be unseemly and share a personal moment that is for them and me. Still, I thank them. And now for the quote:

A writer without a sense of justice and of injustice would be better off editing the yearbook of a school for exceptional children than writing novels. Another generalization. You see; they are not so difficult when they are sufficiently obvious. The most essential gift for a good writer is a built-in, shockproof, shit detector. This is the writer’s radar and all great writers have had it. Ernest Hemingway, The Art of Fiction, No. 21, Paris Review

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A little weekend song, When You Get to Asheville

I don’t know why banjos, fiddles, and the like move me, but they do. Throw in Edie Brickell’s voice, I’m a goner. Steve Martin and Brickell have a rather fine album (Martin is the listed artist) called Love Has Come For You. This song, When You Get to Asheville, mentions email, but no matter, or maybe to its advantage. As another song told us, You Must Remember This… Listen for the line about the dog. Martin and Brickell capture a similar sentiment that I doubt will ever go away until we fade from this place.

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Sunday Night Monday Morning music

I’m re-reading Gravity’s Rainbow (Pynchon now on Kindle by the way). Finished V. Finished Crying of Lot 49. Tried to pick up Vineland which I loved. Wanted the difficult, mad, beautiful language. Back to Gravity’s Angel. For fans I post a song I knew before I read the book. It is Laurie Anderson’s Gravity’s Angel. Honestly, she’s not for everyone. Maybe not for most. But if you dig experimental music and complex lyrics give it a shot. The album Mister Heartbreak from which the track comes is fun too. Again fun for some. It has William Burroughs on Sharkey’s Night. I quoted it at my Cal graduation. That is below too. Shorter.

Where’s the law? Not sure. As Burroughs intones, “And sharkey says: hey, kemosabe! long time no see. he says: hey sport. you connect the dots. you pick up the pieces.” OK for a bit more, as I have said here before, life beyond the law matters. And it turns out that knowing life beyond the law might make you a better lawyer. That, by the way, is why empathy for a judge is important and a good thing. If you can’t walk in someone else’s shoes, at least read more, listen to more, watch more. Great writing, great communication opens the door to the world beyond yours and mine. At least those are the dots I connect. The pieces I pick up.