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Category: Jurisprudence

Now you can insist on control of your material. You can insist on veto power over everything; down to casting and choice of directors and script approval, you can insist on all those things. J.K. Rowling insisted on all those things. And J.K. Rowling got all those things because there were enough people interested in that. Now if you’re not J.K. Rowling, and you insist on all those things, the studios are not going to be very interested or less studios will be interested in it so you’ll get less money or none at all. Or alternatively, you can not insist on everything and you can just sell them the book and what they do with it is what they do with it and you have to live with it. You no longer have approval over anything, you no longer have…you know what I mean? And those are the two extremes. In between of course there’s a vast area of shades of gray.

— George R. R Martin

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George R. R. Martin on Copyright, Inheritance, and Creative Control

He cares much more about French dynastic history than you do.

He cares much more about French dynastic history than you do.

This is Part 3 of the interview I did with George R. R. Martin in  2007.  For background and part 1, click here.  For Part 2, click here. For the audio file, click here.

HOFFMAN: Yeah, but you just generally right. The trope something that really speaks to folks. I guess maybe that raises a question about your fans generally. You’ve obviously got a huge fan base and I’ve been reading a little bit about them. One question that comes up a bunch of different times is fan fiction and what do you think about fan fiction?

MARTIN: I’m opposed to fan fiction.

HOFFMAN: Why?

MARTIN: Well number one, its copyright infringement and it can potentially endanger my copyrights and my trademarks if I were to allow it. Also, yes maybe it’s a gesture of love that they love your characters and they love your world and all that but it’s not the kind of gesture of love that I really want. And for aspiring writers and some of these people, sure it’s a wide range of fan fiction writers, some who are terrible. Some of them are actually talented writers. I think for the talented writers it’s particularly tragic because they should be doing their own material.

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[If] you read some fantasy, the magic is omnipresent. In Harry Potter the magic is omnipresent, a primarily magic universe. They got magic for everything there. Every time you turn around there’s a new magic thing that’s popping up. A magic hat or a magic sword or a spell to solve something. Because magic is so omnipresent, you don’t have to [resort] to mundane ways to…solve a murder mystery. “Who murdered Joe? Well we’ll just give him the truth spell and he’ll tell us who murdered Joe,” or “We’ll just cast this other spell and open the veil of time and we’ll be able to see who murdered Joe.” If those options exist then it’s very difficult to write a traditional John Grisham type novel or a detective novel or anything that depends on evidence and all that because there are all these magical ways of getting it.

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Lawyers in Westeros

An uncomfortable chair in a modern partner's office?

An uncomfortable chair in a modern partner’s office?

This is Part 2 of the interview I did with George R. R. Martin in  2007.  For background and part 1, click here.  For the audio file, click here.

 HOFFMAN: Are there lawyers in your books that are just in the wings off stage that haven’t yet appeared?

MARTIN: That’s an interesting question. I hadn’t really considered that until I started reading those links that you sent me. There are certainly laws but are there special classes of advocates who make their living by interpreting those laws? My inclination is probably not because the laws my books are administered by lords. In some ways it’s government as much for men than law. We like to say our government in the United States is a government of laws not men. In some ways the Seven Kingdoms I think is the reverse. There is basis of a law but also a lot depends on who is interpreting it and who is sitting in the Lord’s seat, who is sitting on the Iron Throne and how they settle these disputes.

HOFFMAN: Well those are ultimate questions but I think in two places one could have imagine lawyers and one of them again will be this church trial because there were church lawyers in the ecclesiastical church system there were lawyers who specialized in canon law. And the second one was at least twice I can think of in the books there’re trials by combat. And I don’t really know what the other alternative would be but I assume would be trial by jury – the path that Tyrion did not choose both times. And I was thinking –

MARTIN: Well he does choose in the first…in the second…second of his two trials, he is being tried – it’s not by jury – it’s by lord. There’s no jury of his peers, no twelve people that are randomly picked but there are three lords sitting on his case and hearing the evidence.

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I’m looking to tell a story here and hopefully an entertaining and engrossing story. I’m not looking to do a study of socioeconomic systems or legal systems or any of these things so the really scholarly works, copious footnotes, and things like that, are less useful to me in some ways.

— George R. R. Martin

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The Law of the Game of Thrones

Game-of-Thrones-game-of-thrones-17629189-1280-720In 2007, I did an interview with GRRM as a part of CoOp’s then vibrant “Law and Hard Fantasy” series.  (Yes, I know I’ve let it drop for half-a-decade, but new interviews are now coming out.)

Given the new-found fame of the Game of Thrones, I decided to have the interview transcribed for those of you who don’t want to listen.  Thanks to Temple’s Danielle Pinol who did the work.  I’m going to provide the transcript in three parts.  Here’s part I, about the roots of sovereign power in Westeros.  Part II talks about lawyers and magic. Part III will talk about fantasy literature more generally.

 

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Economic Dynamics and Economic Justice: Making Law Catastrophic, Middling, or Better?

Contrary to Livermore,’s post,  in my view Driesen’s book is particularly powerful as a window into the  profound absurdity and destructiveness of the neoclassical economic framework, rather than as a middle-ground tweaking some of its techniques.  Driesen’s economic dynamics lens makes a more important contribution than many contemporary legal variations on neoclassical economic themes by shifting some major assumptions, though this book does not explore that altered terrain as far as it might.

At first glance, Driesen’s foregrounding of the “dynamic” question of change over time may, as Livermore suggests, seem to be consistent with the basic premise of neoclassical law and economics:   that incentives matter, and that law should focus ex ante, looking forward at those effects.   A closer look through Driesen’s economic dynamics lens reveals how law and economics tends to instead take a covert ex post view that enshrines some snapshots of the status quo as a neutral baseline.  The focus on “efficiency” – on maximizing an abstract pie of “welfare”  given existing constraints –  constructs the consequences of law as essentially fixed by other people’s private choices, beyond the power and politics of the policy analyst and government, without consideration of how past and present and future rights or wrongs constrain or enable those choices.  In this neoclassical view, the job of law is narrowed to the technical task of measuring some imagined sum of these individual preferences shaped through rational microeconomic bargains that represent a middling stasis of existing values and resources, reached through tough tradeoffs that nonetheless promise to constantly bring us toward that glimmering goal of maximizing overall societal gain (“welfare”) from scarce resources.

Driesen reverses that frame by focusing on complex change over time as the main thing we can know with certainty.  In the economic dynamic vision, “law creates a temporally extended commitment to a better future.” (Driesen p. 52). Read More

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My Textualist Moment — the Use of the Words “Person” or “Persons” or “People” in Our National Bill of Rights

There has been much talk lately about whether corporations are or should be “persons” under the First Amendment, both for free speech and free exercise purposes.images

In a textualist moment, this got me to thinking about the wording of our federal Bill of Rights and what light it might shed on this. Let’s start with the First Amendment. Its focus is a limitation on the powers of Congress and makes no mention of persons until the reference to “the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.”

The Second Amendment mentions people in a similar way: “the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.”

The Third Amendment uses the word “Owner” but not person or persons or people.

The Fourth Amendment is quite explicit: It speaks of the “right of the people” and the rights of “persons.” So, too, with the Fifth Amendment and its reference to “person.”

The Sixth Amendment mentions the rights of “the accused” and likewise uses the male pronoun “his” and “him” in this regard.

The Seventh and Eighth Amendments are silent on the personhood question.

The Ninth Amendment, of course, refers to the rights “retained by the people.”

And the Tenth Amendment reserves rights to “the states respectively, or to the people.”

There you have it. What to make of it? Well, I leave that to others to decide since I am not a bona fide textualist fundamentalist, though I do think text matters as a part of the constitutional calculation of things. Y tu? What do you think? (Feel free to respond in either your individual or corporate capacity.)

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On Circuit Court Judging – Selected Reflections by Judge Robert Bork

borkRecently, I began some extended research on Judge Robert Bork and his views on the First Amendment. In the course of that research, I read various items in the Oral History Project of the Historical Society of the District of Columbia, and in particular the oral history file on Judge Bork. I read a transcript of a March 13, 1992 audio interview with the Judge conducted by Victoria L. Radd (then Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Director of Communications). (Image: here.)

 In the process of reading through that file, I came upon some fascinating comments Judge Bork offered concerning his sense of being a Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. Below I have excerpted a few of those comments.

Assembly Line Jurisprudence

You sit all day in chambers by yourself working on these things and then you go home and talk to the dog at night. It’s a very isolated lifestyle. . . . [E]verybody is busy and you don’t drop in on a judge to kick around a legal question because the judging has become too much of an assembly line process – get the stuff out. And it was regarded as an imposition on somebody to drop in and talk over a case, particularly if they weren’t involved in it. Even if they were involved in it, they communicate by sending a draft back and forth – memoranda and dissents and so forth. Rarely do you get together. We’d get together right after the argument . . . for a discussion and a vote. But typically that’s the last time you are face-to-face about the case.  Read More

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Supreme Court Unanimity

I have a thought experiment that I want to try out.  Can anyone think of a Supreme Court opinion that failed because it was not unanimous?  In other words, is there any opinion that was gravely undermined by the fact that one or two Justices dissented?

I ask this because when you read accounts of certain high-profile cases (for example, BrownHeart of Atlanta Motel, or Nixon), the Justices were concerned about avoiding dissents.  They feared that a dissent would inflame public opinion or stiffen the resolve of elected officials to defy the Court.  In the process, the Court sometimes had to say or omit things to get everyone on board that were unclear or harmful.

What I want to know (or think about) is whether this fear is real or not.  Avoiding a 5-4 decision makes sense, since you never know who the next Justice will be.  When the margin is greater than that, though, I’m not so sure.  Moreover, if a decision is really unpopular, does the presence of a dissent make or break what happens afterwards.  And does even achieving unanimity reduce that hostility?  If Justice Stanley Reed had dissented in Brown, would that have mattered?

 

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To Define the Beginning of Human Life or Not, That Is the Question

Twice a month I meet with some of my students for a critical reading.  In our last January meeting, we decided to commemorate Roe by re-exploring Judith Jarvis Thomson’s  seminal article A Defense of Abortion. Thomson’s defense of induced abortion by exploring our moral duties in the unrealistic case one found oneself kidnapped and plugged in to a virtuous violinist who is sick and needs one’s kidneys for nine months in order to heal has been highly criticized. Nonetheless, every time I read it or discuss it, I find how enlightening her thought experiment still is, as it confronts us with our set of moral beliefs and its incongruences with our policy stances. Moreover, it makes me always ponder about our lack of a well-thought and coherent abortion regulating scheme.  But that is a topic for a different post. Today, I would like to concentrate on a related matter that stemmed from my discussion of Thomson’s article with my students.

By the end of our conversation my students and I were inquiring whether it was possible to assert a defense of stem cell research/therapy even taking for granted the right of life of the embryos, as Thomson did in her paper. It seemed obvious for almost all of us that using embryos for those purposes would be considered a blatant deprivation of the embryo’s right to life and an impermissible use of another person’s body; and thus, could not be sustained under Thomson’s argument. So we decided to try to come up with a scenario similar to Thomson’s violinist that could aid us in exploring the moral adequacy of stem cell research/therapy.

An appropriate thought experiment eluded our not so brilliant minds. We did not want to come up with a fallacious and common place thought experiment such as the one of the burning building test  in which one is forced to decide who to rescue first: twenty 8-cell embryos kept in a freezer or a baby in peril. We were not looking to formulate an experiment tilted to one side like the burning building test, in which the “incomplete human character” of the embryo is made self-evident by the “inescapable instinct” to rescue the “actual” human being. However, the truth is that it is quite difficult to come up, in a couple of minutes, with a reasonable possible scenario in which all the circumstances of stem cell research/therapy are replicated in a way that could sensibly help us assess our moral agency.

First, we would need to come up with a scenario in which we have a “human being” in a permanent frozen state (e.g. a cryogenized virtuous violinist) in which the conditions necessary for a successful life require a willing human host that is either related to the cryogenized violinist or has the authorization of his guardian to serve as a host for nine months.  Second, we must come up with a particular circumstance (e.g. a military operation) that would force the guardian of the cryogenized violinist to choose between using the frozen body to help in the recovery of a sick non-cryogenized human being (e.g. a  young Science Nobel laureate) whose only real, feasible and cost efficient chance to a healthy life is using that frozen body at the expense of eliminating all possible chances of an uncertain future life for the cryogenized violinist or leaving the cryogenized violinist frozen for an indefinite period of time and allowing for the sick non-cryogenized Nobel laureate to die. Finally, we would need to come up with the circumstances that led the cryogenized violinist to be treated as a surplus human being and at the same time be treated as the raw materials for the creation of future equally virtuous violinists (e.g. the practice of cloning virtuous musicians).  Furthermore, the example would need to consider the possibility of making the cryogenized violinist for the sole purpose of healing the sick non-cryogenized laureate (e.g. the possibility of the world coming to an end if the Nobel laureate does not find a solution to the problem before he dies from her sickness).

The end result is a very absurd, unrealistic and perhaps too intricate thought experiment.  Yet, exploring the limits of such an experiment may be a possible way to coming up with a defense of stem cell research/therapy even when one grants the right of life of the embryos.  Nonetheless, I would like to pose that the absurdity and illusory nature of these thought experiments suggest that we should face the inevitable: we must delimit when human life begins if we truly would like to come up with a moral/ethical regulation of stem cell research/therapy. This inescapable moral question is more evident when we contrast our legal stances and nation’s practices on issues like torture, war, death penalty, abortion, euthanasia and justification and necessity defenses.  The system is manifestly incoherent.

I do believe that a sensible answer will only come when we legally embrace the fact that life – and by extension human life – exists in a continuum. Law should echo that reality. A coherent and ethical sound system can only arise after we legally recognize that there is a point in that continuum in which life becomes human and that there are different stages before that point in which life is a subject of certain rights but not the same rights a human life is a subject thereof. Laws should define that moment and those stages. There is no moral reason to avoid doing so. As there is no ethical rationale either to treat totipotent, pluripotent, multipotent, oligopotent, unipotent cells, fully developed human beings not capable of living on their own, and born human beings in the same way.  Furthermore, our history and legal system have always made distinctions on how we treat the right to life of human beings based on particular deontological assumptions.

Our inquiry into how to regulate stem cell research/therapy should not be made under the assumption that embryos are in fact human beings and subjects of the same rights. A valid answer to this recent human reality must be based on a rigorous analysis of moral questions such as: 1. When does a life become a human life?; 2. Which type of rights is a non-human life entitled to?; 3. Are there different stages of a non-human life?; 4. Are those stages deserving of a differentiated right treatment?; 5. What are our moral duties to a human life?; 6.  What are our moral duties to a non-human life and it corresponding stages?; and 7. Under which circumstances are we relieved from those duties to human and non-human lives? These questions should be guiding our legislative process regarding scientific inquiries and not biased assumptions as to what constitutes human life.

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Doubting Opinions

Every once in a while I come across a separate opinion in a case that is labelled “doubting” or “dubitante.”  It’s uncommon at the Supreme Court level (the last one I see came in the 1970s), but there are circuit court judges who use this mode of expression (Judges Easterbrook, Sutton, and Calabresi, to name just three).

I’m not sure what is gained by saying “dubitante” instead of “concurring.”  I suppose the former is clearer because it is communicating something like “I agree with the majority’s rationale, but I might not the next time around,” whereas the latter is saying “I do not agree with this rationale.”  Is there some other reason for using the doubting formulation?

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SCOTUS-Books-in-Brief – Goodbye to the Sloooow Past!

Top Five Books has just announced a forthcoming series of e-books on Supreme Court cases. The series is titled “SCOTUS: Books-in-Brief.”  It is designed to provide readers – lay and scholarly alike – with a reliable, informative, and engaging narrative account of a significant Supreme Court ruling shortly after it comes down. Provided in e-book format, each work will be economically priced and accessible on multiple e-platforms.

Each e-book will be available within a week of the decision and will consist of an historical account of the general subject, a full statement of its facts, profiles of the parties, analyses of the lower court judgments, examination of the briefs filed and the oral arguments in the WMS-cover2Supreme Court, a discussion of the larger issues raised by the case, an analysis of the final judgment, and a comprehensive timeline – and all completed and ready for e-publication shortly after a Court ruling is rendered.

The first book in the series (now virtually complete at 75,000 words save for commentary on the forthcoming ruling) is When Money Speaks: The McCutcheon Decision, Campaign Finance Laws, and the First Amendment. (See excerpt here.)

Writers Wanted!

If you are a good writer, have expertise in a certain area pertaining to a case before the Supreme Court, and can complete a 30,000-40,000 word manuscript (depending on the complexity of the case and subject matter) in a relatively short period of time, then contact us – we’d love to hear from you.

For more information about those on the advisory board and the series generally, click here.