Category: DRM

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CUT THE CORD!! HBO without Cable

O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay! It is about time! HBO has announced it will offer a streaming service in 2015. Earlier claims about the need for cable to market and to work with the cable industry seem to have fallen away. The claim is that there are 80 million homes that do not have HBO, and HBO wants to fix that. Can you say Netflix? Netflix subscriber numbers were flat today. Still, if HBO goes over the wall, I imagine that Showtime and others will too. So I may just succeed in cutting the cable. Atlanta has decent digital signals (though there should be more). The most interesting thing to watch: ESPN’s next move. It has a hold on cable a Brazilian jiujitsu master would respect. But if ESPN decides to go with a direct pay model, it could pick up many new viewers, especially the ones who are used to watching the special college version of ESPN they have for free while at some schools.

These markets may also be quite different. Some may prefer the ease of watching the pre-programed madness that is cable. Heck, if I am channel surfing and see that Ocean’s Eleven is on TNT, I will watch with commercials even though I own the blasted DVD. Oh yes, laugh. Because you know that you do it too. May not be Ocean’s but fill in the blank with Bridget Jones or whatever floats your boat; there is something oddly comforting or easy about finding a program in a guide and selecting it. It seems like a low-grade information overload problem. Rather than reaching for the DVD or searching Netflix or Amazon, having someone else narrow the options tips us into odd choices like watching that same movie for the umpteenth time with God help me commercials!

In any event, I hope the HBO experiment works. I know unbundling may threaten many offerings. But the current costs of cable are absurd and the best content is on just a few channels. I don’t think the new golden age of T.V. will suffer in this new world. It could grow as more people are reached with niche shows (that is how I see things like Breaking Bad and other winners that don’t need huge viewership to succeed). Subscriber shows should be a real thing soon. As I said before, Firefly could have been saved today, because enough viewers would likely have fronted the costs to get a 10-13 episode season. Add in many have the patience to just buy the series and binge, or stream on Netflix or Amazon or HBO, and maybe shorting cable companies is smart.

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There She Is, Your Homemade AR-15

I cannot give a talk about 3D printing without addressing the question of homemade guns. As Gerard and I pointed out in Patents, Meet Napster: 3D Printing and the Digitization of Things, this is America and making guns at home is legal. The issues many faced was whether the gun would work well, fail, or possibly misfire and harm the user. These issues are important as we look at the shifts in manufacturing. Many of us may prefer authorized, branded files and materials for home made goods or prefer to order from a third party that certifies the goods. That said, some gun folks and hobbyists are different. They want to make things at home, because they can. And now, Defense Distributed has made the “Ghost Gunner” “a small CNC milling machine that costs a mere $1200 and is capable of spitting out an aluminum lower receiver for an AR-15 rifle.” That lower is the part the the Federal government regulates.

Accoridng to Extreme Tech, Defense Distributed’s founder Cody Wilson, thinks that “Allowing everyone to create an assault rifle with a few clicks is his way of showing that technology can always evade regulation and render the state obsolete. If a few people are shot by ghost guns, that’s just the price we have to pay for freedom, according to Wilson.” This position is what most folks want to debate. But Gerard and I think something else is revealed here. As ExtremeTech puts it, “This is an entirely new era in the manufacturing of real world objects, in both plastic and metal. It used to be that you needed training as a gunsmith to make your own firearm, but that’s no longer the case.” That point is what motivated me to write about 3D printing and look deeper at digitization and disruption.

The first, short, follow-up on these ideas is in an essay called The New Steam: On Digitization, Decentralization, and Disruption that appeared in Hastings Law Journal this past summer.

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3D Printing Train Continues, Interview on TakePart Live tonight

I will be on TakePart Livetonight at 9 p.m. Pacific/11 Central/12 Eastern, to talk about 3D printing and all the fun it brings. I will be joined by a 3D printer entrepreneur who runs Deezmaker, a comic, and of course the hosts Jacob Soboroff and Cara Santa Maria. I was on the show last fall to talk about privacy and data hoarding. The hosts and crew are HuffPo veterans and a blast. The show is part of Pivot TV, which is available on DirectTV and Dish as well as some cable carriers. Looking forward to great night.

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Upcoming Online Symposium on Professor Anupam Chander’s The Electronic Silk Road

Silk Road coverDanielle and I are happy to announce that next week, Concurring Opinions will host an online symposium on Professor Anupam Chander’s The Electronic Silk Road: How the Web Binds the World Together in Commerce. Professor Chander is a professor at U.C. Davis’s King Hall School of Law. Senators, academics, trade representatives, and pundits laud the book for its clarity and the argument Professor Chander makes. He examines how the law can facilitate commerce by reducing trade barriers but argues that consumer interests need not be sacrificed:

On the ancient Silk Road, treasure-laden caravans made their arduous way through deserts and mountain passes, establishing trade between Asia and the civilizations of Europe and the Mediterranean. Today’s electronic Silk Roads ferry information across continents, enabling individuals and corporations anywhere to provide or receive services without obtaining a visa. But the legal infrastructure for such trade is yet rudimentary and uncertain. If an event in cyberspace occurs at once everywhere and nowhere, what law applies? How can consumers be protected when engaging with companies across the world?

But will the book hold up under our panel’s scrutiny? I think so but only after some probing and dialogue.

Our Panelists include Professor Chander as well as:

Paul Berman

Miriam Cherry

Graeme Dinwoodie

Nicklas Lundblad

Frank Pasquale

Pierluigi Perri

Adam Thierer

Haochen Sun

Fred Tung

And of course

Danielle Citron and I will be there too.

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MMM 3D Printing: It’s magic! But may need some help from the law

As Gerard noted, we have posted our draft of our paper “Patents, Meet Napster: 3D Printing and the Digitization of Things. The area is much fun. Along the way, claims about maybe possible became, oh they’re doing that? OK. Fix the draft and cite. Guns, compounding chemicals, low-temperature metals, oh my. The technology has moved and continues to move in many different ways. The paper has some doctrine, some science and technology studies, and some just plain old wow that’s wild technology. We are excited for the symposium at Georgetown, and we have time to edit and develop. We would love feedback about the legal implications and the technology.

Here’s the abstract perhaps to whet your appetite:

Abstract:
Digitization has reached things. This shift promises to alter the business and legal landscape for a range of industries. Digitization has already disrupted copyright-based industries and laws. As cost barriers dropped, individuals engaged with copyrighted work as never before. The business-to-business models of industrial copyright faltered and in some cases failed. Industries had to reorganize, and claimed foundations for copyright had to be re-examined. This Article examines a prime example the next phase of digitization: 3D printing and it implications on intellectual property law and practice.

3D printing is a general-purpose technology that will do for physical objects what MP3 files did for music. The core patent bargain—sharing the plans on how to make something in exchange for exclusivity—may be meaningless in a world of digitized things. While these devices will unleash the creativity of producers and reduce costs for consumers, they will also make it far easier to infringe patents, copyrights, and trade dress. This will force firms to rethink their business practices and courts to reexamine not only patent doctrine but also long established doctrine in areas ranging from copyright merger to trademark post-sale confusion. Moreover, Congress will need to consider establishing some sort of infringement exemption for 3D printing in the home and expanding the notice-and takedown provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to websites that host software enabling the 3D printing of patented items and distinctive trade dress. While a 3D printer is not yet a common household item, the time to start thinking about that future is now.

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Rent books on Amazon? Hmm.

As I work away on 3D printing I am looking at regulation literature. Ayres and Braithwaite’s Responsive Regulation is available on Amazon for 34.99 for Kindle or you can rent it starting at $14.73 (no kidding, it is that precise). There is a calendar and you can select the length of the rental (3 months comes out to $22.30 and to Amazon’s credit hover over a date and the price appears rather than having to click each date). On the one hand this offering seems rather nifty. Yet I wonder what arguments about market availability and fair use will be made with this sort of rental model for books in play. And this option brings us one step closer to perfect price discrimination. Would I see the same rental price as someone else? Would I need some research assistant to rent for me? Would that person’s price model be forever altered based on some brief period of working for a professor? What about librarians who rent books for work (I suppose work accounts would be differentiated but the overlap between interests may shift what that person sees on a personal account too). Perhaps Ayres and Braithwaite’s regulation pyramid is needed yet again.

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Some more on ISPs and 6 Strikes – Where’s The Citizen Policing?

I wrote about the Six Strikes plan earlier today. I wanted to add a call for transparency on download speeds so the average citizen could police the penalties. The Wired report noted that responses “might include reducing internet speeds.” Given the problems with ISPs providing clear and consistent speeds, it seems to me that if they can reduce speeds in the name of copyright enforcement, they should also be open about what those speeds are. Google’s speed test may be useful and its M-Lab may play a role (M-Lab claims “Measurement Lab (M-Lab) is an open, distributed server platform for researchers to deploy Internet measurement tools. The goal of M-Lab is to advance network research and empower the public with useful information about their broadband connections. By enhancing Internet transparency, M-Lab helps sustain a healthy, innovative Internet.” Hmm. I wonder whether Google’s foray into broadband will not only show the speeds easily but jump onto the ISP copyright enforcement bandwagon. I suppose that would be a consistent approach given the copyright/search results policy, but it may be one that starts to indicate that the alleged tech industry/online activist solidarity is well, alleged.

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In case you missed it, ISPs now have a 6 Strikes Plan, A Whiff of ICANN?

Ah yes the ever-vigilant Internet democracy must have been watching, or maybe it agreed to ISP policing for copyright sort of like Google’s decision to take down search results for copyright issues. Who knows? The Shadow? Anyway, ISPs are now going to monitor usage to police copyright scofflaws. According to Wired, it is a six strikes plan

backed by the Obama administration and pushed by Hollywood and the major record labels to disrupt and possibly terminate internet access for online copyright scofflaws. … The plan, now four years in the making, [will trigger with] four offenses, [participating] residential internet providers {including AT&T, Cablevision Systems, Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Verizon] [will] initiate so-called “mitigation measures” (.pdf) that might include reducing internet speeds and redirecting a subscriber’s service to an “educational” landing page about infringement. The internet companies may eliminate service altogether for repeat file-sharing offenders, although the plan does not directly call for such drastic action.

The action reminds me a little of Stanford University policy on file sharing where three strikes means you are shut out of Internet access and must pay $1,000 to reactivate. As more and more of life is online, I wonder about such a broad stroke for copyright violators. Then again some countries take away driver’s licenses for drunk driving. The U.S.A. is more lax on that front, I think. I am surprised to see that the Center for Copyright Information has a mix of members including Gigi Sohn; as Tim Lee put it “The picks suggest that the architects of the “Copyright Alert” system may be making a serious effort to strike a balance between the interests of copyright holders and the rights of users.”

Tim explained, however, that the board “has little direct authority over the Copyright Alerts system. The real power lies in the hands of the CCI’s executive board, which is stocked with content companies and ISPs.” He has some faith that the advisory roles give the noisy exit power to “public interest advocates like Berman and Sohn some leverage” who “can always resign in protest, giving the CCI a black eye in the press.” I am not so sure that anyone will give a damn in a way that can change the system even if such an exit is needed.

I also wonder whther this is a whiff of ICANN. Tim explained (he is rather good isn’t he?) that “The Copyright Alerts system will provide users with an opportunity to appeal “alerts” to an independent entity. That independent review process will be overseen by the American Arbitration Association. The AAA will train independent reviewers who will, in turn, hear appeals by individual users.” Given the numbers needed and the way ICANN and the UDRP has operated, I am again a bit wary of how this will all play out.

Given the folks involved, I hope my concerns do not pan out. But I would say keep an eye on this one before someone has to say “Help me Obi Wan, err Google? You’re my only hope.” They may not be up for the battle either.

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What Is IP Good For? Madhavi Sunder Has an Answer: The Good Life

Why bother to have intellectual property rights? That question is the question for IP. Madhavi Sunder has answers. Some excellent work on the subject has looked at whether economics has new answers about IP rights and their structure. Others have taken a hard look at whether any economic argument works. Like books by James Boyle, Brett Frischmann, and Julie Cohen, Sunder’s book runs right at intellectual property law and tackles the hard question. Sunder proposes that we have left off asking what is the good; not just the good produced but the good for all of us. In the tradition of critique she asks about power dynamics and whether free culture is also fair culture. She forces us to consider the realities of exchange culture and rules that bind our ability to engage and thus limit our freedom to author ourselves. In my work on trademarks, brands, and culture, I looked at specific ways we have moved from one-way mass market systems to two-way interactive ones as I questioned whether trademark rules make sense and improve society. I love this book because Sunder takes this point and drills into local, national, and global levels. She challenges current narratives about how and why we create with concrete examples of overflowing creation, unfair results, and troubling societal outcomes all of which abound despite claims about incentives and social welfare creation in IP law. Still, she believes the law has the foundations for “plural values at stake in cultural production.” Her prescription is that we should be “ripping, mixing, and burning” law to get to the world where we have not only goods, but a good life. I recommend the book and look forward to our discussion here at Concurring Opinions.

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Symposium on Madhavi Sunder’s From Goods to a Good Life, September 11-13

This week Concurring Opinions is hosting a symposium on Madhavi Sunder’s From Goods to a Good Life (Amazon) published by Yale Press which offers a preview. Madhavi’s work has pushed how many colleagues and I think about intellectual property. I am honored to organize this discussion.

I have more to say about the book, but to whet your appetites, I offer this quote:

The full cultural and economic consequences of intellectual property policies are hidden. We focus instead on the fruits of innovation—more iPods, more bestsellers, more blockbuster drugs—without concern for what is being produced, by whom, and for whose benefit. But make no mistake: intellectual property laws have profound effects on human capabilities…

The symposium will include contributions from Mike Carroll, Laura DeNardis, Brett Frischmann, Mike Madison, Mark McKenna, Frank Pasquale, Zahr Said, Lea Bishop Shaver, Jessica Silbey, and Molly Van Houweling.