Category: Conferences

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Symposium on National Security Policy and the Role of Lawyering

On Thursday, October 28, the Seton Hall Law Review is hosting a day-long symposium in Newark, New Jersey entitled National Security Policy and the Role of Lawyering: Guantanamo and Beyond.  Here’s the description:

The broad focus of the Symposium will be to discuss preventive detention and the future of United States national security policy.  As the United States prepares for the closing of Guantánamo Bay detention center, the country still faces the challenge of balancing national security and individual rights.  Controversy continues to plague U.S.-run prisons abroad, such as Bagram in Afghanistan; at the same time, the country has yet to resolve critical questions surrounding the scope of executive detention authority in the “war on terrorism,” leaving the future of U.S. detention policy uncertain.  We hope to discuss the mark Guantánamo has left on the United States and explore the future of preventive detention from the standpoint of lawyers, scholars, policymakers, the media, and former detainees. 

Panelists will include Peter Finn of the Washington Post,  Dafna Linzer from ProPublica, Steve Vladeck from American University and Joe Margulies from Northwestern.   You can find the full symposium schedule and a list of panelists here.

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GW’s Junior Scholar Workshop and Prizes

As anticipated, the Center for Law, Economics and Finance at George Washington University Law School (C-LEAF)  has formally announced its first annual Junior Faculty Business and Financial Law Workshop and Junior Faculty Scholarship Prizes.    The Inaugural Workshop will be held and Prizes awarded on April 1-2, 2011, at GW Law School in Washington, DC.

Up to ten papers will be chosen from those submitted for presentation at the Workshop. At the Workshop, one or more senior scholars will comment on each paper, followed by general discussion of each paper among all participants. The Workshop audience will include invited junior scholars, faculty from GW’s Law School and Business School, faculty from other institutions, and invited guests.

At the conclusion of the Workshop, up to three papers will be awarded Junior Faculty Scholarship Prizes, of $3,000, $2,000, and $1,000, respectively. Chosen papers will be featured on C-LEAF’s website as part of its Working Paper Series. In addition to participating in the Workshop, all scholars selected to present at the  Workshop will be invited to become Fellows of C-LEAF. Read More

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Kimberlé Crenshaw at Thomas Jefferson Law School Women and Law Conference

I’d like to invite Concurring Opinions readers to attend the 2010 Women and the Law Conference at Thomas Jefferson School of Law. This event, our Tenth Annual Women and Law conference, will examine the past, present and future of intersectionality. Speakers will discuss ways that intersectional analysis illuminates stories of marginalization in the lives of women of color and other groups; and will set out concrete and aspirational visions of what it means to use intersectional awareness to reshape social movements and advance social justice.

The conference will take place on April 30th at 2 p.m.  The keynote speaker is Kimberlé Crenshaw of UCLA and Columbia Law Schools, who will deliver the Ruth Bader Ginsburg lecture.  She will be followed by a distinguished panel of critical race scholars: Devon Carbado, Cheryl Harris, Russell Robinson and Saul Sarabia.

Registration is free for students and faculty.  Additional information and registration is available at www.tjsl.edu/wlp_2010 .  If you have any questions, please let me know.  I hope to see some of you there!

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Conference Announcement and Call for Papers

Professor Mike Zimmer, one of our former Co-Op guests, asked me to pass along information about A Constitutional Law Colloquium: “How Democratic is the Constitution?” For those who are interested, here are the details:

Loyola University Chicago School of Law is organizing A Constitutional Law Colloquium at the Philip H. Corboy Law Center, 25 East Pearson Street, Chicago, IL 60611. This year’s theme will be “How Democratic is the Constitution?” The event will begin on Friday morning, November 5 and end midday on Saturday, November 6, 2010.

Conference Organizers:

Professor Alexander Tsesis, atsesis@luc.edu, 312.915.7929
Professor Michael Zimmer, mzimme4@luc.edu, 312.915.7919

Loyola invites abstract submissions of 150 to 200 words from Constitutional Law professors interested in contributing to the current debates under the broad rubric of this topic. The goal of the conference is to allow professors to develop new ideas with the help of supportive colleagues on a wide range of constitutional law topics.

This is the first annual Loyola conference bringing together constitutional law scholars at all stages of their professional development to discuss current projects, doctrinal developments in constitutional law, and future goals. We hope to schedule presentations for all who submit. In this way, we will provide a forum for the vetting of ideas and invaluable opportunities for informed critiques. Presentations will be grouped by subject matter.

The submission deadline for abstracts is May 31, 2010.
Topics, abstracts, papers, questions, and comments should be submitted to:

Program Administrator Carrie Bird, clbird30@gmail.com

Participants are expected to pay their own travel expenses. Loyola will provide facilities, support, and continental breakfasts on Friday and Saturday, lunch on Friday and Saturday, and a dinner on Friday night.

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Fordham Law Review Symposium on April 16 & 17: The Adequacy of the Presidential Succession System in the 21st Century


fordhamlrev_header

The Fordham Law Review is organizing this event along with former Fordham Law School Dean John D. Feerick, a preeminent scholar on the Twenty-Fifth Amendment, and former Senator Birch Bayh, framer of the Twenty-Fifth Amendment.

The event is a two-day symposium, bringing together leading thinkers and experienced practitioners in the area of presidential succession: Former Senator Birch Bayh, who, as framer of the Twenty-Fifth Amendment and chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Constitutional Amendments, oversaw the hearings and debate on the topic; those who were on the front lines in developing the presidential succession structure (Fred Fielding, former White House Counsel to Presidents Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush, and Benton Becker who served as Counsel to President Ford); those who have written on the subject from a variety of perspectives (Professors Akhil Amar, John Feerick, Edward Foley, Joel Goldstein, Robert Gilbert, and Rose McDermott); Dr. John Fortier and Norman Ornstein, whose work on the Continuity in Government Commission has evaluated the adequacy of this system in a post-9/11 world; Constitutional Law scholars Dean William Treanor, Professor James Fleming, and Robert Kaczorowski; as well as Bill Baker, President Emeritus of WNET.ORG.

The Fordham Law Review will publish the symposium in its December 2010 issue.

Among a number of topics that will be discussed are the ambiguities in the existing constitutional provisions (for example, can presidents invoke the inability provision of the Twenty-Fifth Amendment to temporarily step down during moments of political crisis?); analysis of the constitutionality of the current Succession Act, which puts members of Congress in the line of succession; recommendations for handling a double vacancy in the Presidency and Vice Presidency and the constitutionality of current proposals for dealing with such a dilemma; important gaps and conflicts at various stages of transition (for example, disability or death prior to election or inauguration and potential conflict of interests arising in confirmation hearings of an appointed Vice President); and the constitutionality of informal—extraconstitutional and extrastatutory—arrangements between Presidents and their Vice Presidents, members of their cabinet, and members of Congress.

WHEN:
Friday, April 16 from 9:30 to 5:00 and Saturday, April 17 from 9:30 to 1:00
WHERE:
Fordham Law School
McNally Amphitheatre
140 West 62nd Street
New York, NY 10023
This event is free and open to the public.
Full Schedule here.

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Intersectionality – brief follow-up

I’ve got more detailed notes from the fourth annual Critical Race Studies symposium that I had been hoping to get into shape for posting, but I’ve been swamped with other projects.  So instead of a detailed discussion of panels, I’ll just give a brief overview; time allowing, I’ll add some panel detail next week.   Read More

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Not-Quite-Live-Blogging Intersectionality (Part I: General overview, Thursday)

I’m at the UCLA Intersectionality conference, and so far it has been phenomenal. I’m going to post some brief notes about the sessions I’ve attended so far. I’m typing these up while in a session – the intersectionality teaching and reading workshop. Hopefully these will be moderately coherent.

The conference started with an introduction from Saul, and quick comments from co-sponsors (including me, because TJSL is a co-sponsor of the event. The opening event was very well attended – a hundred people or so (maybe?), even though it was at 10 a.m. on a Thursday. Read More

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The Yale Law Journal, Vol. 119, Issue 4 & Forthcoming Supreme Court Conference

The Yale Law Journal

January 2010 | Volume 119, Issue 4

ARTICLES
Antibankruptcy
Douglas G. Baird & Robert K. Rasmussen
648
Fourth Amendment Seizures of Computer Data
Orin S. Kerr
700
FEATURE
American Needle v. NFL: An Opportunity
To Reshape Sports Law

Michael A. McCann
726
NOTE
Strategic or Sincere? Analyzing Agency Use of
Guidance Documents

Connor N. Raso
782
COMMENTS
Suspending the Writ at Guantánamo: Take III? 825
Constitutional Avoidance Step Zero 837


yljonline

On Tuesday, March 23, 2010, The Yale Law Journal Online will join with the Yale Law School Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic to host the concluding segment of “Important Questions of Federal Law: Assessing the Supreme Court’s Case Selection Process.”  The panel will bring together federal judges, members of the legal academia, and practitioners to discuss potential reforms to the Supreme Court’s certiorari process. All events will be held at Yale Law School’s Sterling Law Building in New Haven, CT. Please click here for more information.

IMPORTANT QUESTIONS OF FEDERAL LAW
Yale Law School | New Haven, CT | March 23, 2010

Panel I: The Judge’s Perspective: Is the Court Taking the “Right” Cases?
4:10pm‐5:30pm, Room 129

Moderator: Linda Greenhouse (Yale Law School)
Panelists:
The Honorable José Cabranes (2d Cir.)
Drew Days (Yale Law School)
The Honorable Brett Kavanaugh (D.C. Cir.)
The Honorable Sandra Lynch (1st Cir.)

Panel II: The Practitioners’ Perspective: What Makes An Issue “Important” to the Court?
5:40pm‐6:55pm, Room 127

Moderator: Charles Rothfeld (Mayer Brown LLP and Yale Law School)
Panelists:
John Elwood (Vinson & Elkins LLP)
Orin Kerr (George Washington University Law School)
Patricia Millett (Akin Gump LLP)
Judith Resnik (Yale Law School)

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Quick Reminder: Intersectionality Conference at UCLA Law, March 11-13

I blogged about it a few months ago, when the call for papers was still open. Now that the conference is just around the corner, here’s another short reminder.

The UCLA Critical Race Studies program – along with a great group of co-sponsors including the Women and Law Project at Thomas Jefferson Law School, the Women of Color Collective at UCLA, the Williams Institute, LatCrit Inc., and a dozen more – is hosting a not-to-be-missed conference on intersectionality. Speakers include, just to name a few, Devon Carbado, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Angela Harris, Catherine MacKinnon, Mari Matsuda, Dorothy Roberts, and Patricia Williams, along with dozens of other leading scholars of feminist legal theory, critical race theory, intersectionality, and a variety of related topics touching on different marginalized groups.

More information, including schedule and registration information, is available at the conference website. I hope to see many of you there!

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Call for Papers — March 12, 2010 Deadline

Seton Hall Law School will host the Third National People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference, September 9-12, 2010.  This conference will address critical national and global issues through the lens of legal scholarship that explicitly and implicitly examines contemporary racial context.  It will feature panels on the “war on terror,” urban revitalization, criminal law, health care, education, immigration, human trafficking, voting rights, international and comparative law, judicial nominations, environmental justice, and corporate responsibility, among others.  It will also include a Junior Faculty and Development Workshop.

The conference planning committee is seeking proposals for panels and workshops that fit within its broad theme, Our Country, Our World in a “Post-Racial” Era.  It is also accepting drafts for work-in-progress sessions and shorter “thoughts-in-progress” sessions to informally discuss future research and writing ideas. 

Please e-mail a one page abstract of your submission to Professor Kamille Wolff, Co-Chair of the Program Committee, at kwolff@tmslaw.tsu.edu by March 12, 2010.  For more information about the conference, go to law.shu.edu/thirdnationalpoc.