Category: Conferences

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Aging Conference at Temple

On behalf of my colleague Nancy Knauer, I’m happy to announce that Temple Law School will host a one day symposium titled Aging in the US:  The Next Civil Rights Movement? In this Symposium, participants will explore elder law and aging policy from a civil rights perspective and begin the important task of rethinking equality across the lifespan.  Over twenty leading scholars and advocates will engage cutting edge public policy issues regarding health care, guardianships, caregiving, institutionalized elders, and the special needs of minority populations. Featured speakers include Nina Kohn from Syracuse Law School and 2011 MacArthur Fellow M.T. Connolly of Lifelong Justice, among many others.  The goal of the Symposium is to move the national conversation surrounding aging beyond the traditional elder law topics of estate planning, benefit eligibility, and health care financing and ask whether elder rights should be the next civil rights movement.  Papers will be published in a special issue of the Temple Political and Civil Rights Law Review.

Information regarding the conference and registration is available at www.law.temple.edu/aging.

National Association of Women Judges Conference

I just wanted to make this announcement about an extraordinary conference:

The National Association of Women Judges is hosting their annual international conference in Newark, New Jersey on October 12-16. On October 14th, there will be a symposium at Rutgers Law School entitled Promoting Global Equality for Women Through the Law and on the 15th Seton Hall Law School will host break-out sessions on various topics including domestic violence, urban revitalization, immigration, forensic evidence, cross-cultural issues in the courts and leadership training. Seton Hall Law student Megan Altman will be receiving the Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg scholarship which will be presented at the NAWJ Gala Saturday night at the Newark Club with Justice Ginsburg delivering the keynote address.

More information here at the NAWJ website. According to an email I received, “There are more than 50 international judges registered for the conference from countries including Argentina, Canada, China, Gambia, Guam, Haiti, Honduras, India, Jordan, Korea, Lagos, Malawi, Moldova, Navajo Nation, Nepal, Philippines, Sarajevo, South Korea, Taiwan, Tanzania, and Uganda.”

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Call for Papers: Dodd-Frank

Call for Papers:

Financial Institutions and Consumer Financial Services Section

AALS Annual Meeting – January 2012

Rubber Hits Road: Implementing Dodd-Frank amid Reform Fatigue

This program will take place one and a half years after the Dodd-Frank Act was signed into law. The law left many of the details of financial reform to be filled in by regulators, raising the risk of capture. Some of the most important rule makings have begun in earnest; others have stalled as reform fatigue sets in. Meanwhile, reform efforts in Europe and international regulatory initiatives remain works-in-progress.

What lessons can we draw from the implementation of Dodd-Frank so far? What have been the greatest achievements and the greatest disappointments as the legislative process has given way to the administrative? What devils have lain hidden in the details of the Federal Register? What aspects of reform have been largely forgotten? What does the path of financial reform say about legislative and regulatory process? What lessons can be drawn from the reform efforts in Europe and elsewhere? Does the focus on regulating institutions detract from a focus on regulating financial instruments, markets or economic functions and risks?

More ominously, is the crisis truly over? Are we at grave risk of fighting the last war? Has reform missed the mark altogether? This meeting is part of a project to engage the legal academy in sustained theoretical and policy contributions to financial regulation. It also presents an opportunity to look at specific rulemakings in detail, as well as to address larger questions about the course of reform after laws are made.

Call for papers:

Law teachers and other scholars are invited to submit manuscripts or abstracts dealing with any aspect of the foregoing topics. Junior faculty members are particularly encouraged to submit manuscripts or abstracts. A review committee consisting of Section officers will select one or more papers or proposals and will invite the author(s) of each selected submission to present their work at the program session in Washington, D.C. in January 2012.

Abstracts should be comprehensive enough to allow the review committee to meaningfully evaluate the aims and likely content of papers they propose. Please send manuscripts or abstracts to the Program Chair (Erik Gerding, University of Colorado) at profgerding@gmail.com no later than August 30, 2010. Please place the name and contact information of authors only on the cover page of submissions.

Please forward this Call for Papers to anyone who might be interested.

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Announcing the Loyola Second Annual Constitutional Law Colloquium

Just a quick note that the Loyola University Chicago School of Law has scheduled its Second Annual Constitutional Law Colloquium for October 21 & 22, 2011.  The conference is being organized by Professors John E. Nowak, Juan Perea, Alexander Tsesis and Michael Zimmer.  

 The goal of the conference is to allow professors to develop new ideas with the help of supportive colleagues on a wide range of constitutional law topics.  To this end, the conference is aimed at bringing together constitutional law scholars at all stages of their professional development to discuss current projects, doctrinal developments in constitutional law, and future goals.  The organizers are hoping to be able to schedule presentations for all who submit and will group participants by subject matter.   

Professors who are interested in participating should submit an abstract of  150 to 200 words by May 31, 2011.  

Topics, abstracts, papers, questions, and comments should be submitted to:

 Program Administrator Carrie Bird, cbird@luc.edu

Participants are expected to pay their own travel expenses. Loyola will provide facilities, support, and continental breakfasts on Friday and Saturday, lunch on Friday and Saturday, and a dinner on Friday night.

ClassCrits Conference Call for Papers

The ClassCrits blog has a number of interesting posts up recently. The group has announced a call for papers for a September conference; here is the notice:

ClassCrits IV, “Criminalizing Economic Inequality”

This workshop, the fourth meeting of ClassCrits, takes as its theme the criminalization of economic inequality. The dominance of “free market” economic theory and policy has been accompanied in the U.S. by increasing reliance on the criminal justice system to make and enforce economic policy. The criminal justice system is increasingly used to control persons and groups whose participation in formal markets is marginal at best. Many aspects of traditional immigration law have morphed into “crimmigration”, appropriating domestic criminal law enforcement tools and redefining whole communities of workers and their families as “illegal people.” States and municipalities have criminalized the lives of homeless people, including those who are mentally ill.

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YLJ Online Symposium: A Republic of Statutes

yljonline

The Yale Law Journal Online has just published the final piece of a symposium devoted to William N. Eskridge, Jr. and John Ferejohn’s remarkable new book, A Republic of Statutes: The New American Constitution. The book chronicles the development of constitutional principles derived not directly from the text of the Constitution itself but from the implementation of entrenched “superstatutes” by administrative and executive officials. The symposium essays examine both the broad contours of the theory advanced by Eskridge and Ferejohn as well as its application to particular fields of law, such as immigration, national security, and health care. Visit YLJ Online to read the full collection:

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Gender Justice and Indian Sovereignty

It is my pleasure to invite you to Thomas Jefferson School of Law’s upcoming 10th Anniversary Women and the Law Conference, “Gender Justice and Indian Sovereignty: Native American Women and the Law,” on Friday, February 18, 2011.

This one-day conference will be held at TJSL’s brand-new state-of-the-art building in downtown San Diego, and will feature the annual Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lecture (founded in 2003 with generous support from Justice Ginsburg), by our Keynote Speaker, Interim Associate Dean Stacy Leeds, University of Kansas School of Law, former Justice of the Cherokee Nation Supreme Court and currently chief judge of three Indian Nation tribal courts. Her Lecture will be titled: “Resistance, Resilience, and Reconciliation: Reflections on Native American Women and the Law.” Read More

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What If? Symposium

I’m pleased to announce that the Indiana Law Review will hold its 2011 Symposium on “What If?  Counterfactuals in Constitutional History.”  The following are expected to attend this conference on April 1 (an appropriate day for a counterfactual event):

David Fontana, George Washington Law School

Heidi Kitrosser, Minnesota Law School

Alison LaCroix, University of Chicago Law School

Carlton Larson, UC Davis Law School

Kim Roosevelt, University of Pennsylvania Law School

Ilya Somin, George Mason Law School

Amanda Tyler, George Washington Law School

If you’re interested in attending, please contact Amanda Mulroony at amanbake@iupui.edu

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Stalking About Your Generation

Yesterday, I had the all-too-brief pleasure of sitting in on the first couple of talks at the Wisconsin Law Review’s Symposium, Intergenerational Equity and Intellectual Property, here in Madison.

Organized by my colleague, Shubha Ghosh (and starring, among others, CoOp-erator Deven Desai), the goal is important:  How do we understand the intergenerational consequences of a legal regime—intellectual property—that is strongly determined by the present, but which has significant, but under-theorized, consequences for the future?  Fights about extending the term of the Mickey Mouse copyright—or any set of long-haul rights—don’t just affect my kids, but potentially their kids, their kids’ kids, and so on.  These are, in short, really fights about intergenerational equity.

I was only able to hear Michigan’s Peggy Radin (Property Longa, Vita Brevis) and Penn’s Matt Adler (Intergenerational Equity: Puzzles for Welfarists), but as expected, both provided awesome overviews of these sorts of problems.  As Radin pointed out, intellectual property (knowledge and information law generally) always involves two types of generational problems: One is temporal (my parents, me, my kids, their kids, etc.); the other is technological (my students barely know from videotape; I will never beat my daughter at any computer game).

Adler explained that it is easy (and perhaps imprudent) to dismiss the utility of welfare economics as a tool to make these sorts of decisions.  Certainly, we might say, Benthamite sums of utils could predict little for those not in existence (the future):  what would their utility function be, really?

Hope I die before you get old

Yet, he observed, robust and subtle analytic models and conceptual frameworks are being developed by the Sens and Arrows of the world, and they may (if the future is bright) help develop more equitable and effective decision tools for matters with a long temporal reach.

Those who follow state politics may find this all a bit ironic. Wisconsin’s recent election was a decisive victory for Republicans, who captured both houses of the legislature and the Governor’s office on a message which may strain the state’s motto, “Forward.”

If Republicans keep their word, tax breaks for the rich and elderly will replace education and healthcare spending for the young and unborn; fossil fuel (old tech) subsidies will replace biofuel (new tech) development; and the University may have to fight to continue its path-breaking stem-cell research, certainly a way to kill both jobs in the present and medical miracles in the future. This may be good for baby boomers, but isn’t likely so hot for their grandkids.

Hope you die before I get old

Wisconsin’s liberals are, of course, despondent over their loss of power and position.  Yet, forecasting and discounting long-term causation are among the things that make questions of intergenerational equity  so interesting and difficult.  I doubt Newt Gingrich thought in 1994 that the Contract with America would virtually assure Bill Clinton a second term, but today the former seems to have led to the latter.   Likewise, it is certain that neither Jeremy Bentham nor Pete Townshend could have predicted the duration of their memetic contributions to today’s discussions about tomorrow.  They probably just thought it was all rock and roll.

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CELS V: The Year of the Experiment

Data Collection Makes Everyone Grumpy and Hunched Over

For the last several years, I’ve posted recaps of the Annual Empirical Studies Conference.  (See me, @ Cornell, @ USC).  This year, as promised, will be no different.  Yale hosted CELS V, and the committee did a bang up job: the food was tasty; there were no technical snafus of note; and the panels appeared to have a high degree of internal validity & congruence. Richard Brooks, Alan Gerber, Dan Kahan, Yair Listokin, Tracey Meares, and (especially) Roberta Romano are all due a round of applause, or, better yet, supersized computer monitors so they can see their data better.  In this post, I’m going to provide a running diary of the conference.  It will be like you were there with me, except you don’t have to suffer through my bouts of social anxiety!

Unfortunately, I missed the hottest ticket of the conference, Bruce Ackerman’s commentary on Law/Versteeg’s The Evolution and Ideology of Global Constitutionalism.  From all reports, Ackerman said something like: “wrong questions, wrong data, wrong theory,” and then imploded in frustration.  Instead of watching those fireworks, I was watching Yair Listokin present The Meaning of Contractual Silence: A Field Experiment [Here’s an older version of the paper].  Listokin ran a field experiment selling ipods on ebay, some with a warranty, some as-is, and some silent on the warranty term. He found that individuals paid attention to the contract, and there was some evidence that the UCC default was about what they thought silence meant.  As he admitted, there were problems with the design of the study – particularly, (1) small & skewed samples; and (2) a lack of clarity about how much buyers know about ebay’s unique and self-contained dispute resolution system.  As someone remarked after the presentation, it would have been interesting had Listokin sold all the customers bad ipods (instead of good ones) and studied how the contract terms influenced behavior post-“breach”.  Then again, who needs that IRB hassle?

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