Category: Conferences

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FAN 35.1 (First Amendment News) — Creative Freedom & the First Amendment

On Wednesday, October 22, Freedom House and the Motion Picture Association of America, in support of Free Speech Week, will host a discussion on Creative Freedom and the First Amendment. The event will be held in Washington, D.C.

image001Panelists

Using current on-screen examples, the discussion will focus on how movies and television shows in the United States are powerful instruments that inform and enlighten us, advancing debates on crucial social and cultural issues. The creative freedom the First Amendment protects is fundamental to the ability of storytellers to tell these stories through television and film in America.

 Free Speech Week is an annual, non-partisan national event celebrating the value of freedom of speech.

→ For more information about the Creative Freedom event, contact Ivory Zorich at ivory_zorich@mpaa.org

Announcing the We Robot 2015 Call for Papers

CommonsRobotHere is the We Robot call for papers, via Ryan Calo:

We Robot invites submissions for the fourth annual robotics law and policy conference—We Robot 2015—to be held in Seattle, Washington on April 10-11, 2015 at the University of Washington School of Law. We Robot has been hosted twice at the University of Miami School of Law and once at Stanford Law School. The conference web site is at http://werobot2015.org.

We Robot 2015 seeks contributions by academics, practitioners, and others in the form of scholarly papers or demonstrations of technology or other projects. We Robot fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate. We particularly encourage contributions resulting from interdisciplinary collaborations, such as those between legal, ethical, or policy scholars and roboticists.

This conference will build on existing scholarship that explores how the increasing sophistication and autonomous decision-making capabilities of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, to the battlefield disrupts existing legal regimes or requires rethinking of various policy issues. We are particularly interested this year in “solutions,” i.e., projects with a normative or practical thesis aimed at helping to resolve issues around contemporary and anticipated robotic applications.
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MarkelFest! at SEALS

Howard Wasserman and the team at Prawfs have organized a get-together at SEALS in memory of Dan Markel for this Saturday, and we at CoOp are honored to co-sponsor it. I’m sure this is the first of many conferences where Dan’s memory will be celebrated. Full details are here.

Conference: Critiquing Cost-Benefit Analysis of Financial Regulation

I am looking forward to attending (and briefly speaking) at a conference on May 19-20 in Washington, D.C. on “Critiquing Cost-Benefit Analysis of Financial Regulation.”

The event will take place at George Washington Law School. Co-sponsors include Center for Law, Economics and Finance (C-LEAF), the Association of Professors of Political Economy and the Law (APPEAL), Americans for Financial Reform (AFR), Better Markets, the Center for Progressive Reform (CPR) and SUNY Buffalo Law School.

Confirmed keynote speakers include John C. Coates, (author of “Cost-Benefit Analysis of Financial Regulation: Case Studies and Implications”) and law and economics professor William K. Black (whose classic book The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One still influences policy debates).

Here is a link for registration, and additional details. I’ve pasted the agenda below.
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Jotwell Conference on Legal Scholarship: Call for Papers

As someone who’s written for Jotwell’s Cyberlaw edition for years, I wanted to plug the site’s journals as terrific places to find excellent, underrecognized scholarship. On the occasion of its 5th anniversary, Jotwell is hosting a conference on legal scholarship:

JOTWELL, the Journal of Things We Like (Lots), is an online journal dedicated to celebrating and sharing the best scholarship relating to the law. To celebrate Jotwell’s 5th Birthday, we invite you to join us for conversations about what makes legal scholarship great and why it matters.

In the United States, the role of scholarship is under assault in contemporary conversations about law schools; meanwhile in many other countries legal scholars are routinely pressed to value their work according to metrics or with reference to fixed conceptions of the role of legal scholarship. We hope this conference will serve as an answer to those challenges, both in content and by example.

We invite pithy abstracts of proposed contributions, relating to one or more of the conference themes. Each of these themes provides an occasion for the discussion (and, as appropriate, defense) of the scholarly enterprise in the modern law school–not for taking the importance of scholarship for granted, but showing, with specificity, as we hope Jotwell itself does, what good work looks like and why it matters.

Abstracts are due by May 20.  Congrats to Michael Froomkin on the great success of Jotwell, and what looks to be a fascinating conference.

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ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 05.01.2014

 

Awards season: The American Bar Association has announced the finalists for the 2014 Silver Gavel Awards for Media and the Arts. The ABA awards the Silver Gavel to those artists in film, nonfiction, fiction, and other arts who most closely meet the association’s objectives in advancing public understanding of law and the justice system. This year, the 47 members of the screening committee reviewed 169 entries, selecting 19 finalists for the Standing Committee to review. The ABA began giving out the Gavel Awards in 1958. Among the finalists: See the complete list of finalists for 2014 here. The ABA will announce winners on May 15.

 

Curtain going up: The Elevator Repair Service will be performing Arguendo,  a play based on the landmark case Barnes v. Glen Theatre (501 U.S. 560 (1991)) at the International Festival of Arts & Ideas, New Haven, CT, from June 18-22. Here’s part of the syllabus for the case:

Respondents, two Indiana establishments wishing to provide totally nude  dancing as entertainment and individual dancers employed at those  establishments, brought suit in the District Court to enjoin enforcement  of the state public indecency law  —  which requires respondent dancers to  wear pasties and a G-string  —  asserting that the law’s prohibition against  total nudity in public places violates the First Amendment. The court  held that the nude dancing involved here was not expressive conduct.   The Court of Appeals reversed, ruling that nonobscene nude dancing  performed for entertainment is protected expression, and that the statute was an improper infringement of that activity because its purpose  was to prevent the message of eroticism and sexuality conveyed by the  dancers.

The play “[uses] verbatim oral arguments and breathtaking projections by celebrated visual artist Ben Rubin [and] introduces us to the Justices—who try to get to the bottom of this First Amendment puzzle—and the attorneys on both sides who gamely try to keep up.” The play closed recently at the Woolly Mammoth Theatre in DC.

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Fifth Annual Constitutional Law Colloquium

Loyola University Chicago School of Law will host a Constitutional Law Colloquium on Friday, November 7 and Saturday, November 8, 2014.

This will be the fifth annual Loyola constitutional law colloquium.  Organizers hope to attract constitutional law scholars at all stages of their professional careers to discuss current projects, doctrinal developments in constitutional law, and future goals. The conference will bring together scholars to discuss their works-in-progress concerning constitutional issues, such as, but not limited to Free Speech, Substantive Due Process, Equal Protection, Suffrage Rights and Campaign Finance, Process Oriented Constitutionalism, Constitutional Interpretation, Constitutional Theory, National Security and Constitutional Rights, Due Process Underpinnings of Criminal Procedure, Judicial Review, Executive Privilege, Suspect Classification, Free Exercise and Establishment of Religion, and Federalism. As in years past, there will be many opportunities for the vetting of ideas and for informed critiques. Submissions will be liberally considered, but participation is by invitation only. Presentations will be grouped by subject matter.

Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of California-Irvine School of Law, will be the keynote speaker.

Titles and abstracts of papers should be submitted electronically to constitutionlaw@luc.edu no later than June 15, 2014.

The Law Center is located on Loyola’s Water Tower campus, near Michigan Avenue’s Magnificent Mile, Lake Michigan, Millennium Park, the Chicago Art Institute, and Chicago Symphony Center.

Participants’ home institutions are expected to pay for their own travel expenses. Loyola will provide facilities, meals, and support.

There are numerous reasonably priced hotels within walking distance of the Loyola School of Law and Chicago’s Magnificent Mile.

Conference Organizers:

Professor Barry Sullivan, Cooney & Conway Chair in Advocacy, bsullivan7@luc.edu
Professor Alexander Tsesis, atsesis@luc.edu
Professor Michael Zimmer, mzimme4@luc.edu

Program Administrator:
Heather Figus, ConstitutionLaw@law.edu

 

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There & Back Again: John Rizzo & Yuri Nosenko

John Rizzo gave thirty-four years of service as an attorney for the Central Intelligence Agency, serving with distinction under eleven directors and rising to acting general counsel.  Yuri Nosenko, who died in 2008, was a lieutenant colonel in the KGB, a Soviet defector, and suspected double agent.

RizzoNosenkoWhat do they have in common?  A late night, one-on-one, vodka-soaked discussion of Nosenko’s three years of unremitting torture by Rizzo’s employer. The torture produced nothing, neither confirmation that Nosenko was a Soviet mole nor confidence that he was not.  In his new memoir, Company Man, Rizzo asserts that this meeting left an indelible impression on him as a young lawyer. But just how did he put that experience to use when he evaluated the legality of the “Enhanced Interrogation Program” that landed on his desk in the CIA General Counsel’s office after 9/11?

His answer is not found in his memoir.  But he did give an answer last week, when I asked him this question at an outstanding symposium on the future of national security law held at Pepperdine Law School.  The conference was organized by Professor Greg McNeal ably assisted by 3L Shelby Doyle and her team of student editors at the Pepperdine Law Review.

Comrade Nosenko’s story, and Mr. Rizzo’s answer, follow after the break. Read More

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Call for Abstracts: The Taslitz Galaxy

I ordinarily don’t post calls for abstracts, but I’ll make an exception for this event to honor the life and work of Andrew Taslitz.  Andy’s work was creative and interdisciplinary; he saw things in ways that nobody else did, and his works were filled with insight.  He was also a wonderfully warm and kind person.  His untimely passing is such a devastating loss, not just for the scholarly community, but also because he was such a generous and genuine friend to so many people, including me.  I will miss him greatly.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

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The Taslitz Galaxy: A Gathering of Scholars at Howard

Howard University School of Law is hosting a conference in honor of Andrew Taslitz. It is not a traditional symposium, for we expect concurrent sessions on many subjects. It is open to people who knew Taz and to those who were inspired by his writing or teaching.

If you would like to take part in this event, please submit an abstract by May 30, 2014 to the co-chairs named below. The conference is free but speakers must pay their own way.

Howard Law Journal is dedicating an issue to Professor Taslitz. If you would like to write a short piece for this issue, let us know when you submit your abstract. First drafts of the paper will be due on August 15, 2014.

GUIDELINES FOR SPEAKING  & WRITTEN ESSAYS

  • The Essays will be short, with a maximum of 10,000 words, including footnotes.
  • We are dividing the proposals into two tracks. The first track involves speaking &/or writing on substantive issues. The second track we are calling “The Tao of Taz,” a more personal approach. Both options are explained below.
  • You may suggest a panel for the gathering.

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Third Annual Robotics and Law Conference “We Robot”

hdr-we-robot-2014-1Michael Froomkin, Ian Kerr, and I, along with a wonderful program committee of law scholars and roboticists, have for three years now put on a conference around law, policy, and robotics.  “We Robot” returns to the University of Miami School of Law from Stanford Law School this year and boasts an extraordinary roster of authors, commentators, and participants.  Folks like Jack Balkin, Ann Bartow, Kenneth Anderson, Woodrow Hartzog, Mary Anne Franks, Margot Kaminski, Kate Darling, and David Post, among many others.  Not to mention a demo from a roboticist at the University of Washington whose lab built the surgical robot for the movie Ender’s Game.

I’ve discovered that academics in other disciplines habitually list the acceptance rate of papers.  We Robot III accepted only twenty-five percent of the papers under submission, which compares favorably with the strongest and longest-running conferences in computer science, electrical engineering, and human-computer interaction.  Indeed, judging by the abstracts at least, the papers this year are very exciting, taking on difficult and timely issues from a range of perspectives.

On behalf of our community I invite you to register for and attend We Robot, April 4-5, 2014, in Coral Cables, Florida.  I also hope those who enjoyed We Robot I and II will chime in below, if inclined!  Thank you,

The We Robot III Planning Committee