Category: Clinical Law

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Prosecutors vs. Divorce Court Judges

What do prosecutors and divorce court judges have in common?

Although this sounds like the start to a lawyer joke, I think examining the two groups together can yield interesting insights. One commonality is their wide and essentially unreviewable discretion.   Prosecutors can decline to charge altogether or can choose which charges to bring.   Divorce court judges often decide based on broad notions of fairness how to split a couple’s entire life savings, and also have power to prohibit parents from having overnight guests when they have physical custody of their children.

The literature on prosecutors is full of potential solutions to the perceived problems of unchecked discretion. One solution is to provide more judicial review. This has been a popular proposal in family law as well, where commentators seek more appellate review of trial court discretion. In my previous post, I explored ways of incorporating community input into family law decisions. This could be framed as roughly analogous to calls for various forms community policing or notice and comment sentencing.

Other reforms call on prosecutors to voluntarily develop guidelines. I want to explore what that might look like if translated to the family law context. Could judges band together and create local guidelines? The answer appears to be no. Below the fold I argue that, contrary to what most appellate courts have held, there are reasons to think that individual judges should be allowed to publically announce their personal rules of thumb and groups of judges should be allowed to publically create group rules of thumb.

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Clinical Law Review Workshop – Registration deadline is June 30, 2014

The Clinical Law Review will hold its next Clinical Writers’ Workshop on Saturday, September 27, 2014, at NYU Law School.

The Workshop will provide an opportunity for clinical teachers who are writing about any subject (clinical pedagogy, substantive law, interdisciplinary analysis, empirical work, etc.) to meet with other clinicians writing on related topics to discuss their works-in-progress and brainstorm ideas for further development of their articles. Attendees will meet in small groups organized, to the extent possible, by the subject matter in which they are writing. Each group will “workshop” the draft of each member of the group.

Participation in the Workshop requires the submission of a paper because the workshop takes the form of small group sessions in which all members of the group comment on each other’s manuscripts. By June 30, all applicants will need to submit a mini-draft or prospectus, 3-5 pages in length, of the article they intend to present at the workshopFull drafts of the articles will be due by September 1, 2014.

As in the previous Clinical Law Review Workshops, participants will not have to pay an admission or registration fee but participants will have to arrange and pay for their own travel and lodging. To assist those who wish to participate but who need assistance for travel and lodging, NYU Law School has committed to provide 10 scholarships of up to $750 per person to help pay for travel and lodging. The scholarships are designed for those clinical faculty who receive little or no travel support from their law schools and who otherwise would not be able to attend this conference without scholarship support. Applicants for scholarships will be asked to submit, with their 3-5 page prospectus, by June 30, a proposed budget for travel and lodging and a brief statement of why the scholarship would be helpful in supporting their attendance at this conference.  The Board will review all scholarship applications and issue decisions about scholarships in early July.The scholarships are conditioned upon recipients’ meeting all requirements for workshop participation, including timely submission of drafts.

Information about the Workshop – including the Registration form, scholarship application form, and information for reserving hotel rooms – is available on-line at:

http://www.law.nyu.edu/journals/clinicallawreview/clinical-writers-workshop

If you have any comments or suggestions you would like to send us, we would be very happy to hear from you. Comments and suggestions should be sent to Randy Hertz at randy.hertz@nyu.edu.

— The Board of Editors of the Clinical Law Review