Category: Articles and Books

1

Bright Ideas: Mark Weiner on his new book Rule of the Clan

Sometimes fortune smiles upon you. I met Mark Weiner when we started law school. My life and my work is much better for it. Mark is a scholar and more. He obtained his B.A. in American Studies from Stanford, his J.D. from Yale, and his PhD in American Studies from Yale.

His most recent project is his excellent book, The Rule of the Clan. Ambassadors, professors from all around the world, members of the 9/11 commission, and publishers have embraced the book. Mark argues, and I think rather well, that the state has a quite important role to play, and we ignore that to our peril. Publishers Weekly has said:

A nuanced view of clan-based societies … Weiner’s argument is a full-throated defense of the modern centralized state, which he sees as necessary to protect human rights: “In the face of well-intended but misguided criticism that the state is inimical to freedom, we must choose whether to maintain the state as our most basic political institution or to let it degrade.” An entertaining mix of anecdote and ethnography.

The New York Journal of Books has called the book “accessible, mesmerizing, and compelling.”

I wanted to get into how Mark came up with the project, why it matters, and, for the writers out there, the process of writing about such a complex subject but in a way that is accessible to a general audience. So I asked Mark whether we could do a Bright Ideas interview. He graciously agreed.

Mark, the book is great. I want to jump in and ask, What do you mean by “clan”?

Thanks, Deven. In my book, I consider clans both in their traditional form, as a subset of tribes, but also as a synecdoche for a pattern by which humans structure their social and legal lives: “the rule of the clan.” Clans are a natural form of social and legal organization. They certainly are more explicable in human terms than the modern liberal state and the liberal rule of law. Because of the natural fact of blood relationships, people tend to organize their communities on the basis of extended kinship in the absence of strong alternatives.

So why clans now?

Two reasons. First, the United States is involved militarily in parts of the world in which traditional tribal and clan relationships are critical, and if we don’t understand how those relationships work, including in legal terms, we have a major problem.

Let me give you an example from Guantanamo. In the book, I tell a story of a college friend who was in charge of the team there interrogating detainees from Saudi Arabia. (I should note that my friend finds torture morally repugnant and against the national interest, as do I, and that she has advocated for this view in meaningful ways.) Over the course of her work, my friend realized that because of the first-name/last-name structure of the detainee tracking system, basic information about detainee tribal affiliations hadn’t been gathered or had been lost. This meant, among other things, that we couldn’t fully appreciate the reason why some of these men had taken up arms against us in the first place—for instance, because the United States had become embroiled in their centuries-long, domestic tribal war with the House of Saud.

Our ignorance about these issues is what I call the contemporary “Fulda Gap.” Our lack of knowledge about more traditional societies hinders our ability to understand the motivations of those who oppose us and leaves us vulnerable—and, even more important, it diminishes our ability to cooperate with our friends and to assist liberal legal reformers abroad in ways that are both effective and ethical.

The second reason to study clans, and ultimately for me even more important than the first reason, has to do with our own political discourse here at home. You could say that I became interested in clans because of widespread ideological attacks against the state within liberal societies—that is, attacks on government. By this I mean not simply efforts to reduce the size of government or to make it more efficient. Instead, I mean broadside criticisms of the state itself, or efforts to starve government and render it anemic.

I think you are saying there is something about clans that helps us organize and understand our world. What is it?

It’s often said that individual freedom exists most powerfully in the absence of government. But I believe that studying the rule of the clan shows us that the reverse is true. Liberal personal freedom is inconceivable without the existence of a robust state dedicated to vindicating the public interest. That’s because the liberal state, at least in theory, treats persons as individuals rather than as members of ineluctable status or clan groups. So studying clans can help us imagine what our social and legal life would become if we allow the state to deteriorate through a lack of political will.

By the way, the idea that the state is somehow inimical to freedom—that we gain individual freedom outside the state, rather than through it—is hardly limited to the United States. It was a core component of Qaddafi’s revolutionary vision of Libya. Or consider Gandhi, who advocated for a largely stateless society for postcolonial India. Fortunately for India, his vision wasn’t realized. Instead, we owe the prospects for further liberal development there to the constitution drafted by B. R. Ambedkar.

Hold on. From Indian independence to Libyan revolution seems a long jump. Can you help me connect the dots?

Read More

0

The Rule of the Clan – Mark Weiner’s new book

What is happening with the world? Is it falling apart? Is the state the problem? Is everything to big? Is everyone better off breaking into small groups? Mark Weiner has answers in his book The Rule of the Clan. Understanding clans helps us understand the problems and relationships among individual liberty, the state, domestic policy, and foreign policy.

Mark Weiner is one of the best thinkers I know. I will note that Mark is one of my dearest friends as well. Mark has authored three books. The first two have won awards. The latest, Rule of the Clan, is, to me, yet more impressive. I will be posting more about this book. But for now, here is Mark on the Brian Lehrer Show.

1

AIG Book Event at 92d St Y

At the 92d Street Y in New York Tuesday night, Betty Liu of Bloomberg TV will moderate a discussion with Hank Greenberg and me about our recent book, The AIG Story.  The book has been widely reviewed, with most reviews (such as by James Freeman and John Coyne) quite favorable, although several have been written by authors (especially Susan Antilla and also Kathryn Canavan) whose biases and erroneous preconceptions prevented them from reading the book or rendering a fair account.

We’ve also been doing various book events, in New York and Washington, starting with the Asia Society and including earlier this week at Cardozo Law School (where I’m visiting) and later this term at Fordham Law School (where I visited last term).  The setting and format at the Y should make for a real treat, and I was delighted to see the event listed in the “Spare Times” section of today’s New York Times under Spoken Word as well as in “Books and Ideas”section of this weekend’s Wall Street Journal under Ideas.

5

The Cultural Construction of the Bicycle

Before automobiles first appeared in urban spaces, parents regularly sent children outside to play in the street. Today, noone would hesitate to label any parent who did that as reckless. The cultural distance between then and now is substantial. Readers interested in its course should check out Peter Norton’s excellent, and consistently surprising, Fighting Traffic.

I am regular bike commuter in New York City, along with an increasing number of other people. Bikes, under the law, are supposed to follow the same rules of the road as motor vehicles. But many cyclists, here in New York at any rate, don’t. They slow rather than stop at red lights and stop signs. They weave around pedestrians in crosswalks. They go the wrong way on one way streets. It’s a great case study of why people obey the law: we cyclists break these rules because they seem so manifestly unsuited to our circumstances. I yield rather than stop for some red lights and some pedestrians, when it seems clearly safe to do so (although I draw my personal line at salmoning upstream in a one-way zone). But I would never in a million years blow through a red light when driving a car. Even in the middle of the night, even if  nobody is coming and I know nobody is coming, I sit there patiently in the empty intersection until the light turns green.

Can the law take the lead in developing rules that make enough sense for biking for transport that cyclists would obey them? Or must we await, as we did in the case of automobiles, a new cultural construction of bicycling? (As Norton demonstrates, a lot of people died in “accidents” while the new construction of the car was emerging.) Is the wait worth it if that new construction would be optimized by what my colleagues Sonia Katyal and Eduardo Peñalver might call bicyclists’ productive disobedience? Notwithstanding my wish for a more top-down approach, it seems that  lawyers and regulators have given more thought how to optimize traffic rules for driverless cars than for bicycles.

I was in London two weeks ago giving a paper, where the bike share system has made urban cycling even more ubiquitous than it is in New York. A few days’ observation found, just as in New York, cyclists ignoring red lights and going the wrong way on one way streets.  But I didn’t see one instance in London of two cyclist behaviors I see regularly here:  failing to stop for pedestrians and riding on the sidewalk.  London cyclists’ disobedience seems more productive than New Yorkers’.

17

Is Forensics Law?

I’ve blogged on these pages before about the claim, popularized by Larry Lessig, that “code is law.”  During the Concurring Opinions symposium on Jonathan Zittrain’s 2010 book The Future of The Internet (And How To Stop It), I cataloged the senses in which architecture or “code” is said to constitute a form of regulation.  “Primary” architecture refers to altering a physical or digital environment to stop conduct before it happens.  Speed bumps are a classic example.  “Secondary” architecture instead alters an environment in order to make conduct harder to get away with—for instance, by installing a traffic light camera or forcing a communications network to build an entry point for law enforcement. Read More

1

The Disclosure Crisis

Thank you to Danielle for the lovely (re)introduction and to Concurring Opinions for inviting me to blog this month.

The Washington Law Review hosted a symposium Thursday entitled “The Disclosure Crisis,” which covered everything from privacy policies to restaurant hygiene grades. The gist of the conference, on my view, was that the only thing piling up faster than examples of mandated disclosure as a regulatory strategy is the evidence it does not work. Time and time again, officials choose to intervene in a given area by requiring companies and others to reveal information so that individuals can protect themselves and police the market. And time and time again, disclosure ends up helping few if any consumers or citizens actually make better decisions.

Read More

0

New Edition of The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America

It is a pleasure to announce the coming publication of a new edition of The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America, expected to be available around March 8.  Along with the vintage content from previous editions that has made this collection a long seller, I am adding essays from Buffett’s annual letters to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders since 2008, the date of the prior edition. New material addresses:

●the financial crisis and its continuing implications for investors, managers and society

●the housing bubble at the bottom of that crisis

●the debt and derivatives excesses that fueled the crisis and how to deal with them

●controlling risk and protecting reputation in corporate governance

●Berkshire’s acquisition and operation of Burlington Northern Santa Fe

●the role of oversight in heavily regulated industries

● investment possibilities today

●weaknesses of popular option valuation models

Some other material has been rearranged to deepen the themes and lessons that the collection has always produced:

● Buffett’s “owner-related business principles” are in the prologue as a separate subject

● valuation and accounting topics are spread over four instead of two sections and reordered to sharpen their payoff.

Those who are familiar with The Essays will notice from the accompanying image that we have made the cover snappier than has been our custom.  (Thanks for the cover design to Tim Colton, of Carolina Academic Press, which will continue to partner with me in the distribution of the book.) The main reason: the book’s traditional covers could be seen well in physical form but pictures of them, shown on the internet, could not. Since most sales are done over the internet these days, the cover needed a face lift.  

The adage remains, however, that one should not judge a book by its cover.  This book should continue to be judged on its content and organization, in which a distinctive investment and business philosophy is coherently articulated.  

Thanks to the many fans of the book, first published in 1997.  I hope you enjoy the updated edition.   And I hope to see many of you in Omaha for the Berkshire shareholders’ meeting in May. 

15

Harvard Law Review Symposium on Privacy & Technology

This Friday, November 9th, I will be introducing and participating in the Harvard Law Review’s symposium on privacy and technology.  The symposium is open to the public, and is from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM at Harvard Law School (Langdell South).

I have posted a draft of my symposium essay on SSRN, where it can be downloaded for free.  The essay will be published in the Harvard Law Review in 2013.  My essay is entitled Privacy Self-Management and the Consent Paradox, and I discuss what I call the “privacy self-management model,” which is the current regulatory approach for protecting privacy — the law provides people with a set of rights to enable them to decide for themselves about how to weigh the costs and benefits of the collection, use, or disclosure of their data. I demonstrate how this model fails to serve as adequate protection of privacy, and I argue that privacy law and policy must confront a confounding paradox with consent.  Currently, consent to the collection, use, and disclosure of personal data is often not meaningful, but the most apparent solution — paternalistic measures — even more directly denies people the freedom to make consensual choices about their data.

I welcome your comments on the draft, which will undergo considerable revision in the months to come.  In future posts, I plan to discuss a few points that I raise my essay, so I welcome your comments in these discussions as well.

The line up of the symposium is as follows:

Symposium 2012:
Privacy & Technology

Daniel J. Solove
George Washinton University
“Introduction: Privacy Self-Management and the Consent Paradox”

Jonathan Zittrain
Harvard Law School

Paul Schwartz
Berkeley Law School
“The E.U.-U.S. Privacy Collision”

Lior Strahilevitz
University of Chicago
“A Positive Theory of Privacy”

Julie Cohen
Georgetown University
“What Privacy is For”

Neil Richards
Washington University
“The Harms of Surveillance”

Danielle Citron
University of Maryland

Anita Allen
University of Pennsylvania

Orin Kerr
George Washington University

Alessandro Acquisti
Carnegie Mellon University

Latanya Sweeney
Harvard University

Joel Reidenberg
Fordham University

Paul Ohm
University of Colorado

Tim Wu
Columbia University

Thomas Crocker
University of South Carolina

Danny Weitzner
MIT

4

Brin’s “Existence,” the Fermi Paradox, and the Future of Privacy

I just finished David Brin’s “Existence,” his biggest new novel in years.  Brin, as some readers know, has won multiple Hugo and Nebula awards for best science fiction writing.  He also wrote the 1999 non-fiction book “The Transparent Society: Will Technology Force Us to Choose Between Privacy and Freedom?”.  More about that in a bit.

Existence is full of big ideas.  A main focus is on the Fermi Paradox, which observes that we would expect to find other forms of life out there among the hundreds of billions of suns, but we haven’t seen evidence of that life yet.  If you haven’t ever thought through the Fermi Paradox, I think it is a Genuine Big Question, and well worth contemplating.  Fortunately for those who like their science mixed with fiction, Brin weaves fifty or so possible answers to the Fermi Paradox into his 550-page novel.  Does climate change kill off other races?  Nuclear annihilation?  Do aliens upload themselves into computers once they get sophisticated (the “singularity”), so we never detect them across the void?  And a lot, lot more.

It took me a little while to get into the book, but I read the last few hundred pages in a rush.  I’ve had the pleasure to know Brin for a bunch of years, and find him personally and intellectually engaging.  I was pleased to read this, because I think it will intrigue curious minds for a long time as our telescopic views of other planets deepen our puzzlement about the Fermi Paradox.

As for privacy, my own view is that the privacy academics didn’t take his 1999 book seriously enough as an intellectual event.  One way to describe Brin’s insight is to say that surveillance in public becomes cheaper and more pervasive over time.  For Brin, having “control” over your face, eye blinks, location, etc., etc. becomes futile and often counter-productive once cameras and other sensors are pervasive and searchable.  Brin picked up on these themes in his earlier novel, “Earth,” when elderly people used video cameras to film would-be muggers, deterring the attacks.  In the new novel, the pervasive use of the 2060 version of Google Glasses means that each person is empowered to see data overlays for any person they meet.  (This part is similar to the novel “Rainbow’s End” by Brin’s friend Vernor Vinge.)

Surveillance in public is a big topic these days.  I’ve worked with CDT and EFF on USvJones.com, which asked law academics to propose doctrine for surveillance in public.  Facial recognition and drones are two of the hot privacy topics of the year, and each are significant steps towards the pervasive sensor world that Brin contemplated in his 1999 book.

So, if you like thinking about Big Ideas in novel form, buy Existence.  And, if you would like to retain the Fair Information Principles in a near future of surveillance in public, consider Brin more carefully  when you imagine how life will and should be in the coming decades.

0

Call for Nominations for Foundational Works in Health Law

The American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, the Section of Law, Medicine & Health Care of AALS, and the American Health Lawyers Association seek nominations of foundational works of scholarship in health law, very broadly defined, published in English before December 31, 2010.  We intend to publish an edited volume in an academic press.

Nominations must be accompanied by a brief description, not to exceed 300 words, of the importance of the scholarly work, addressed to:

Ted Hutchinson, Executive Director

American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics

765 Commonwealth Avenue

Boston, MA 02445

thutchinson@aslme.org

 

The first round of nominations will close on December 31, 2012.

On behalf of the sponsors,

 Kevin Outterson

Boston University School of Law

mko@bu.edu

I. Glenn Cohen

Harvard Law School

igcohen@law.harvard.edu