Category: Architecture

8

Memory on the Sewanee Campus

sewaneeflags.jpgIt doesn’t take a lot of skill to predict that this New York Times article about the controversy over what we used to call “The University of South” and what’s now called “Sewanee: The University of the South” is going to generate, well, a lot of controversy.

First, some background. A few years ago, apparently motivated by a marketing study, the University of the South began emphasizing the “Sewanee” part of its name. Alumni have been concerned (to put it mildly) that it’s not just about the name, however. They think there is a lot more at stake on the campus–like how the University deals with its distinguished and complex history. At the center of that history is the University’s founder, Leonidas Polk. Bishop Polk was, also, a general in the Confederate States Army.

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10

Old Courthouse Architecture

The other day, I blogged about new courthouse architecture. A few of the commentators said they had a soft spot for older courthouse architecture, which I share. Therefore, I thought I’d surf the web for some examples of older courthouses. I love architecture, and I found many an interesting picture to share with you. Here is what I found, with the year each was constructed:

courthouses-old4.jpg

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12

New Courthouse Architecture

They’re being built at a staggering rate. New ones are rapidly replacing old ones. Top architects are being called in to design them. . . .

No, I’m not talking about stadiums. I’m talking about courthouses. A recent Legal Affairs article chronicles a dramatic transformation in courthouse architecture and describes the building boom in new courthouses. Courthouses used to be built as “solemn, neo-Classical style structures,” but recently things have changed. Today, top architects bid on the construction of courthouses:

The new architect selection standards coincide with the largest federal courthouse building initiative in the nation’s history, a program necessitated by the rise in the number of federal cases—up some 20 percent in the last decade—and a shift in caseloads from the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt. As droves of people continue to move from Buffalo to Houston or from St. Louis to Phoenix, caseloads are moving with them. In all, nearly 200 courthouses will be built or renovated over the next 25 years, at a cost in the tens of billions of dollars.

If you’re interested in the history of courthouse architecture, the article is well worth checking out. One of the courthouses discussed in the article is the stunning new federal courthouse in Boston, pictured below:

courthouse-boston3.jpg

For all the law architecture nerds out there, I did a little web surfing and found some pictures of new or planned courthouses. Beginning with state courthouses, here are ones from Lexington, SC, Lexington, KY, and Syracuse, NY:

courthouses-state1.jpg

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1

The Unappreciated East Pediment

justiceliberty.jpgSince Miers’s nomination has focused the attention of the blogosphere on the Supreme Court, I figured that now would be a good time to discuss the unappreciated east pediment of the Supreme Court building. The lion’s share of the pedimentary attention at the Court goes to the west pediment. This makes sense, of course, since the building faces west (like the Capitol it has its back to Europe), but I think that it has led to an undue focus on the west pediment’s inscription: “Equal Justice Under Law.” Don’t get me wrong. I am all for equal justice under the law, but I think it is unfortunate this is the particular legal maxim-engraved-in-marble that has become so exclusively adopted as an icon of our law. I think that we would do well to pay more attention to the inscription on the east pediment, which reads “Justice the Guardian of Liberty.”

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