Category: Administrative Law

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FAN 40.1 (First Amendment News) Banzhaf responds to Corn-Revere on FCC Redskins Flap

Professor John Banzhaf

Professor John Banzhaf, III

In an earlier post I profiled Robert Corn-Revere’s WSJ op-ed entitled “Free-Speech Foes Call an Audible — Bringing the FCC into the ‘Redskins’ debate is an invitation for First Amendment mischief.” The op-ed was written in critical response to a petition filed by George Washington Law Professor John Banzhaf to the Federal Communications Commission concerning the use of the Washington Redskins’ name on broadcast airwaves. At the end of my blog profile I invited Professor Banzhaf to respond, which he has now done. His response is set out below.

Robert Corn-Revere apparently objects that I have asked the FCC not to renew the broadcast license of a station that repeatedly and unnecessarily broadcasts a word which has been found in several legal proceedings to be a racial slur even when applied to an NFL team – “R*dskins,” the so-called R-word, equivalent to the N-word so hateful to African Americans, and never used on the air – and is even so defined in most dictionaries. But, in an apparent attempt to prove some point, he describes at length a major life-saving step I persuaded the FCC to take, and (perhaps deliberately) overlooks several obvious points.

In 1966 I persuaded the FCC with one filing (far shorter than the one now in question, and one which many likewise called “frivolous” at the time) to apply a largely unknown and moribund principle – the “Fairness Doctrine” — to cigarette advertising. The result was that anti-smoking messages were broadcast on radio and TV for the first time — hundreds of millions of (1968) dollars worth. This caused the country’s first major drop in cigarette consumption; estimated by itself to have saved millions of lives. It also led directly to a ban on cigarettes commercials; something which saved even more lives, and hundreds of billions of dollars in health care costs. [See  Banzhaf, et al. v. Federal Communications Commission, et al. (D.C. Cir., 1968, per Bazelon, C.J.)]

imagesThose who seek to hide behind the First Amendment argued then, as Corn-Revere does now, that both moves — first forcing stations to broadcast statements against smoking, and then banning them from running cigarette commercials — violated Free Speech, but I successfully defended both decisions in court. Thus, I was able to persuade the FCC to make one of its most important and significant decisions ever — one which saved millions of lives and got rid of cigarette commercials — yet Corn-Revere criticizes the fact that the FCC granted my request, apparently because the Fairness Doctrine was later abandoned. Yet this makes as much sense as criticizing the Special Prosecutor legislation (which I also had a hand in bringing into effect) — which helped save the country from a major constitutional crisis during Watergate — because it likewise was eventually allowed to expire.

He also fails to mention another FCC filing of mine that forced the major TV stations in DC — and eventually around the country – to begin featuring African Americans as reporters and in other significant on-air positions. That one, like the one he now criticizes and seeks to belittle, was likewise based on allegations of racism. Corn-Revere also fails to note how many of my other agency petitions, likewise derided as “frivolous” and/or publicity stunts at the time, were granted and were successful: in getting women admitted, for the first time, to the Cosmos Club and to formerly all-male state-supported military academies; in restricting and ultimately banning smoking on airplanes; in changing labels on foods, birth control pills and elsewhere; in striking down various forms of sex-based price discrimination, etc.

Although Corn-Revere opines (citing no authority) that my petition has no legal basis, three former FCC commissioners (including a former Chairman), as well as almost a dozen broadcasting law superstars, have publicly stated that such broadcasts are probably illegal under current law. The current FCC Chairman has stated that my petition will be taken seriously and evaluated on its merits, something he would not have said if it were obviously “a publicity stunt, not a serious legal argument.” And other broadcast law attorneys who oppose the petition have been forced to admit that it will at the very least likely hold up the license renewals of the stations for a considerable period of time, impacting their credit ratings, their ability to sell or transfer assets, etc.

Given that at least one TV station lost its license based upon allegations of racism, and that the FCC previously ruled that racial slurs constituted “profanity” (which cannot be broadcast during prime time), the tremendous value of a station’s broadcast license, and my track record in persuading the FCC and many other agencies to take unprecedented steps in response to imaginative petitions many said had no chance of success, given all that the question is: Should stations ignore this new movement and continue to bet the farm (their FCC licenses), simply to be able to say “R*dskins” rather than “DC” or “Washington” when providing the sports scores or otherwise talking about this NFL team?

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Should the FTC Be Regulating Privacy and Data Security?

This post was co-authored with Professor Woodrow Hartzog.

This past Tuesday the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed a complaint against AT&T for allegedly throttling the Internet of its customers even though they paid for unlimited data plans. This complaint was surprising for many, who thought the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) was the agency that handled such telecommunications issues. Is the FTC supposed to be involved here?

This is a question that has recently been posed in the privacy and data security arenas, where the FTC has been involved since the late 1990s. Today, the FTC is the most active federal agency enforcing privacy and data security, and it has the broadest reach. Its fingers seem to be everywhere, in all industries, even those regulated by other agencies, such as in the AT&T case. Is the FTC going too far? Is it even the FTC’s role to police privacy and data security?

The Fount of FTC Authority

The FTC’s source of authority for privacy and data security comes from some specific statutes that give the FTC regulatory power. Examples include the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) where the FTC regulates online websites collecting data about children under 13 and the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA) which governs financial institutions.

But the biggest source of the FTC’s authority comes from Section 5 of the FTC Act, where the FTC can regulate “unfair or deceptive acts or practices in or affecting commerce.” This is how the FTC has achieved its dominant position.

Enter the Drama

Until recently, the FTC built its privacy and security platform with little pushback. All of the complaints brought by the FTC for unfair data security practices quickly settled. However, recently, two companies have put on their armor, drawn their swords, and raised the battle cry. Wyndham Hotels and LabMD have challenged the FTC’s authority to regulate data security. These are more than just case-specific challenges that the FTC got the facts wrong or that the FTC is wrong about certain data security practices. Instead, these challenges go to whether the FTC should be regulating data security under Section 5 in the first place. And the logic of these challenges could also potentially extend to privacy as well.

The first dispute involving Wyndham Hotels has already resulted in a district court opinion affirming the FTC’s data protection jurisprudence. The second dispute over FTC regulatory authority involving LabMD is awaiting trial.

In the LabMD case, LabMD is contending that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) — not the FTC — has the authority to regulate data security practices affecting patient data regulated by HIPAA.

With Wyndham, and especially LabMD, the drama surrounding the FTC’s activities in data protection has gone from 2 to 11. The LabMD case has involved the probable shuttering of business, a controversial commissioner recusal, a defamation lawsuit, a House Oversight committee investigation into the FTC’s actions, and an entire book written by the LabMD’s CEO chronicling his view of the conflict. And the case hasn’t even been tried yet!

The FTC Becomes a Centenarian

And so, it couldn’t be more appropriate that this year, the FTC celebrates its 100th birthday.

To commemorate the event, the George Washington Law Review is hosting a symposium titled “The FTC at 100: Centennial Commemorations and Proposals for Progress,” which will be held on Saturday, November 8, 2014, in Washington, DC.

The lineup for this event is really terrific, including U.S. Supreme Court Justice Steven Breyer, FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez, FTC Commissioner Joshua Wright, FTC Commissioner Maureen Ohlhausen, as well as many former FTC officials.

FTC 03 GW

Some of the participating professors include Richard Pierce, William Kovacic, David Vladeck, Howard Beales, Timothy Muris, and Tim Wu, just to name a few.

At the event, we will be presenting our forthcoming article:

The Scope and Potential of FTC Data Protection
83 George Washington Law Review (forthcoming 2015)

So Is the FTC Overreaching?

Short answer: No. In our paper, The Scope and Potential of FTC Data Protection, we argue that the FTC not only has the authority to regulate data protection to the extent it has been doing, but it also has the authority to expand its reach much more. Here are some of our key points:

* The FTC has a lot of power. Congress gave the FTC very broad and general regulatory authority by design to allow for a more nimble and evolutionary approach to the regulation of consumer protection.

* Overlap in agency authority is inevitable. The FTC’s regulation of data protection will inevitably overlap with other agencies and state law given the very broad jurisdiction in Section 5, which spans nearly all industries. If the FTC’s Section 5 power were to stop at any overlapping regulatory domain, the result would be a confusing, contentious, and unworkable regulatory system with boundaries constantly in dispute.

* The FTC’s use of a “reasonable” standard for data security is quite reasonable. Critics of the FTC have attacked its data security jurisprudence as being too vague and open-ended; the FTC should create a specific list of requirements. However, there is a benefit to mandating reasonable data security instead of a specific, itemized checklist. When determining what is reasonable, the FTC has often looked to industry standards. Such an approach allows for greater flexibility in the face of technological change than a set of rigid rules.

* The FTC performs an essential role in US data protection. The FTC’s current scope of data protection authority is essential to the United States data protection regime and should be fully embraced. The FTC’s regulation of data protection gives the U.S. system of privacy law needed legitimacy and heft. Without the FTC’s data protection enforcement authority, the E.U. Safe Harbor agreement and other arrangements that govern the international exchange of personal information would be in jeopardy. The FTC can also harmonize discordant privacy-related laws and obviate the need for new laws.

* Contrary to the critics, the FTC has used its powers very conservatively. Thus far, the FTC has been quite modest in its enforcement, focusing on the most egregious offenders and enforcing the most widespread industry norms. The FTC should push the development of the norms a little more (though not in an extreme or aggressive way).

* The FTC can and should expand its enforcement, and there are areas in need of improvement. The FTC now sits atop an impressive body of jurisprudence. We applaud its efforts and believe it can and should do even more. But as it grows into this role of being the data protection authority for the United States, some gaps in its power need to be addressed and it can improve its processes and transparency.

The FTC currently plays the role as the primary regulator of privacy and data security in the United States. It reached this position in part because Congress never enacted comprehensive privacy regulation and because some kind of regulator was greatly needed to fill the void. The FTC has done a lot so far, and we believe it can and should do more.

If you want more detail, please see our paper, The Scope and Potential of FTC Data Protection. And with all the drama about the FTC these days, please contact us if you want to option the movie rights.

Cross-posted on LinkedIn

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The Campus Book Tour

If you are publishing a new book–as almost all Co-Op bloggers seem to be doing, including Danielle, Frank, and me–getting the word out entails effort across mainstream media, social media, niche blogs, radio and TV, and, of course, old-fashioned book tours.  While technology and industry change have opened other media to more authors and others in the marketplace of ideas, the book tour has lost ground with the rise of ebooks and etailing and the decline of the traditional bookstore.

Into that void, however, the university is stepping. And not just for campus books like William Deresiewicz’s Educating Sheep,  in the swing of a 20-stop university based tour.  By reaching out to friends across the academy, a book tour can be fashioned to reach relevant communities. Targeting the open minds that ideally characterize university gatherings, the campus tour might even be more consequential than you could have done criss-crossing the country’s old Borders, Barnes & Noble, and Books-A-Million stores.

Thanks to the generosity of a network of professorial friends, such a book tour for Berkshire Beyond Buffett: The Enduring Value of Values, starts tomorrow at the University of Delaware. This is first in a series for a 20-stop tour, most at universities or other learned societies, as well as one in the Author at Google / You Tube series.  The banners or pennants of many of the schools appear below and a full regularly updated list can be found here. School Pennants

While what I most enjoy is preparing my lecture and then engaging in Q&A, putting the trip together also has its rewards, especially connecting with so many wonderful colleagues across so many schools.  But I know it’s a lot more work for them than me, so I want to use this blog post to shout out my deep gratitude to all those who are helping with this, listed specifically below.

For those authors now thinking about organizing a campus book tour, I should mention that it takes considerable effort, entails some frustration, and, like most everything in social life, should include a commitment to give at least as much  you hope to get in the exercise.   When I have a complete list of tips to pass on after this tour its completed, I’ll write them up in a blog post here.  For now, I can say that the wonderful people helping with this have made it thoroughly worthwhile.  Looking forward to seeing everyone on the road! Read More

Interview on The Black Box Society

BBSBalkinization just published an interview on my forthcoming book, The Black Box Society. Law profs may be interested in our dialogue on methodology—particularly, what the unique role of the legal scholar is in the midst of increasing academic specialization. I’ve tried to surface several strands of inspiration for the book.

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F.F. — Make of him what you will, but . . .

Felix Frankfurter

Felix Frankfurter

I want to recommend a relatively new article in the Journal of Supreme Court History. It is impressively researched, commendably thoughtful, and refreshingly balanced. Before doing so, however, permit me to say a few prefatory words.

It is hard to be fair when writing of those with whom we disagree, and harder still when we dislike their personal manner. Arrogant, argumentative, and devious – these are not the words that fair-minded scholars like to use unless the fit is fair. All of which takes us back in time to this man: Felix Frankfurter (1882-1965).

What to make of him?

As a Supreme Court Justice he was, in Mel Urofsky’s words, “a divisive figure whose jurisprudential philosophy is all but ignored today.” Others have been even less kind in their assessment of the temperament and jurisprudence of the Justice from Vienna. While Cass Sunstein has recently labored to revive respect for Justice Frankfurter and his judicial opinions, that effort may prove Sisyphean (save, perhaps, in a few discrete areas involving federal jurisdiction).

Still, there was more to Felix Frankfurter than the life he led on the Court between 1939 and 1962. The trajectory of his career (fueled by hard work, ambition, and brilliance) is an immigrant-come-to-America success story at its best. His work – first with Louis Brandeis and then on his own – to advance the cause of fair and humane labor practices exemplifies the Progressive movement in its glory. Then there was the role he played early on in helping to launch the ACLU. With a mix of courage and insight, he later called for a retrial for Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti by way of an impressive lawyer-like article he published in the Atlantic in 1927; the article was thereafter expanded into a small book. And, of course, there is more, much more, which brings me back to that article I alluded to earlier.

Sujit Raman

Sujit Raman

Sujit Raman (the chief appellate lawyer in Maryland’s U.S. Attorney’s office) has just published an engaging and highly informative article. Its title: “Felix Frankfurter and His Protégés: Re-examining the ‘Happy Hot Dogs.’” It captures Felix in all his complexity and does so with objective nuance. With skilled brevity Raman also sketches the story of the Jewish immigrant’s struggle to assimilate, the Harvard Law student’s meritocratic success, the progressive’s desire to improve government when he went to work for Henry Stimson (first in New York and then in Washington, D.C), and then the Harvard professor’s cultivation of the best and brightest, whom he invited to his Sunday teas.

Above all, Sujit Raman’s real story is about Felix Frankfurter’s “greatest legacy,” namely, the “legions of students he trained and nurtured at the Harvard Law School, . . . who, in their own right, shaped the age in which they lived.” Consistent with that objective, Frankfurter’s “avowed intent as a professor was to instill in his students an interest in public service, and from his earliest days, he began collecting recruits for his crusade.” In time, they would come to be known as Frankfurter’s “Happy Hot Dogs” as Hugh Samuel Johnson tagged them.MTE5NTU2MzE2MjE5NDc1NDY3

Could he be snobbish? Yes. Could he be petty? Yes. Spiteful? Yes. Did he delight in manipulating matters from unseen sidelines? Yes again.

Clearly, F.F. had his psychological warts. Yet, when one steps back and beholds the man and this patch of his life work at a detached distance, he stands rather tall. Why?

Now, to cut to the chase: “Frankfurter was one of the New Deal’s intellectual architects as well as one of its most accomplished draftsmen of policy – yet he had no legislative portfolio or any official position in the Roosevelt Administration.” Moreover, adds Raman, “Frankfurter was the New Deal’s principal recruiting agent. He placed his protégés in all levels of government, and consequently his vision was carried forth, albeit indirectly, by his able lieutenants.” In sum, “the New Deal was in many ways the embodiment and culmination of Frankfurter’s life work.”

James Landis

James Landis

In the span of 28 pages (buttressed by 127 scholarly endnotes), Sujit Raman fills in many of the blanks in the Professor-and-the-New-Deal story. While he is cautious not to exaggerate Frankfurter’s role and influence, Raman’s account makes it difficult to deny the remarkable magnitude of Frankfurter’s unique impact on public law and its operation at a crucial stage in our legal history.

True, the “Happy Hot Dogs” story has been told before and from a variety of perspectives (see, e.g.,  here and here). Even so, Mr. Raman does what others before him have not quite done: he tells the story in a concise yet authoritative way and with enough panache to draw the reader back in history for glimpses into the exciting world of F.F. and his adept protégés – the likes of Thomas G. Corcoran (video here), Benjamin V. CohenJames M. Landis, David Lilienthal, and Charles Wyzanski, among others. They were all part of Frankfurter’s network, all “elite lawyers” hand picked because of their ties to F.F. and their “reformist inclinations.”

Whatever your opinion of Felix Frankfurter, his star may yet brighten anew, though probably not in the universe of Supreme Court history and jurisprudence. His true galaxy was elsewhere – in that realm where the “minds of men” move the gears of government to places only once imagined in classrooms in Cambridge.

Ask your librarian for, or go online or order a copy of, Sujit Raman’s illuminating article in volume 39 (March 2014, #1, pp. 79-106)) of the Journal of Supreme Court History. Better still, join the Supreme Court Historical Society. Either way, it will serve you well.

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The FTC and the New Common Law of Privacy

I’m pleased to announce that my article with Professor Woodrow Hartzog, The FTC and the New Common Law of Privacy, 114 Colum. L. Rev. 583 (2014), is now out in print.  You can download the final published version at SSRN.  Here’s the abstract:

One of the great ironies about information privacy law is that the primary regulation of privacy in the United States has barely been studied in a scholarly way. Since the late 1990s, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has been enforcing companies’ privacy policies through its authority to police unfair and deceptive trade practices. Despite over fifteen years of FTC enforcement, there is no meaningful body of judicial decisions to show for it. The cases have nearly all resulted in settlement agreements. Nevertheless, companies look to these agreements to guide their privacy practices. Thus, in practice, FTC privacy jurisprudence has become the broadest and most influential regulating force on information privacy in the United States — more so than nearly any privacy statute or any common law tort.

In this Article, we contend that the FTC’s privacy jurisprudence is functionally equivalent to a body of common law, and we examine it as such. We explore how and why the FTC, and not contract law, came to dominate the enforcement of privacy policies. A common view of the FTC’s privacy jurisprudence is that it is thin, merely focusing on enforcing privacy promises. In contrast, a deeper look at the principles that emerge from FTC privacy “common law” demonstrates that the FTC’s privacy jurisprudence is quite thick. The FTC has codified certain norms and best practices and has developed some baseline privacy protections. Standards have become so specific they resemble rules. We contend that the foundations exist to develop this “common law” into a robust privacy regulatory regime, one that focuses on consumer expectations of privacy, extends far beyond privacy policies, and involves a full suite of substantive rules that exist independently from a company’s privacy representations.

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FTC v. Wyndham

The case has been quite long in the making. The opinion has been eagerly anticipated in privacy and data security circles. Fifteen years of regulatory actions have been hanging in the balance. We have waited and waited for the decision, and it has finally arrived.

The case is FTC v. Wyndham, and it is round one to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Some Quick Background

For the past 15 years, the FTC has been one of the leading regulators of data security. It has brought actions against companies that fail to provide common security safeguards on personal data. The FTC has claimed that inadequate data security violates the FTC Act which prohibits “unfair or deceptive acts or practices in or affecting commerce.” In many cases, the FTC has alleged that inadequate data security is deceptive because it contradicts promises made in privacy policies that companies will protect people’s data with “good,” “adequate,” or “reasonable” security measures. And in a number of cases, the FTC has charged that inadequate data security is unfair because it creates actual or likely unavoidable harm to consumers which isn’t outweighed by other benefits.

For more background about the FTC’s privacy and data security enforcement, please see my article with Professor Woodrow Hartzog: The FTC and the New Common Law of Privacy, 114 Colum. L. Rev. 583 (2014). The article has just come out in print, and the final published version can be downloaded for free here.

Thus far, when faced with an FTC data security complaint, companies have settled. But finally one company, Wyndham Worldwide Corporation, challenged the FTC. A duel has been waging in court. The battle has been one of gigantic proportions because so much is at stake: Wyndham has raised fundamental challenges the FTC’s power to regulate data security under the FTC Act.

The Court’s Opinion and Some Thoughts

1. The FTC’s Unfairness Authority

Wyndham argued that because Congress enacted several data security laws to regulate specific industries (FCRA, GLBA, HIPAA, COPPA) that Congress did not intend for the FTC to be able to regulate data security more generally under FTC Act unfairness. The court rejected this argument, holding that “subsequent data-security legislation seems to complement—not preclude—the FTC’s authority.”

This holding seems quite reasonable, as the FTC Act was a very broad grant of authority to the FTC to regulate for consumer protection for most industries.

Read More

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Economic Dynamics and Economic Justice: Making Law Catastrophic, Middling, or Better?

Contrary to Livermore,’s post,  in my view Driesen’s book is particularly powerful as a window into the  profound absurdity and destructiveness of the neoclassical economic framework, rather than as a middle-ground tweaking some of its techniques.  Driesen’s economic dynamics lens makes a more important contribution than many contemporary legal variations on neoclassical economic themes by shifting some major assumptions, though this book does not explore that altered terrain as far as it might.

At first glance, Driesen’s foregrounding of the “dynamic” question of change over time may, as Livermore suggests, seem to be consistent with the basic premise of neoclassical law and economics:   that incentives matter, and that law should focus ex ante, looking forward at those effects.   A closer look through Driesen’s economic dynamics lens reveals how law and economics tends to instead take a covert ex post view that enshrines some snapshots of the status quo as a neutral baseline.  The focus on “efficiency” – on maximizing an abstract pie of “welfare”  given existing constraints —  constructs the consequences of law as essentially fixed by other people’s private choices, beyond the power and politics of the policy analyst and government, without consideration of how past and present and future rights or wrongs constrain or enable those choices.  In this neoclassical view, the job of law is narrowed to the technical task of measuring some imagined sum of these individual preferences shaped through rational microeconomic bargains that represent a middling stasis of existing values and resources, reached through tough tradeoffs that nonetheless promise to constantly bring us toward that glimmering goal of maximizing overall societal gain (“welfare”) from scarce resources.

Driesen reverses that frame by focusing on complex change over time as the main thing we can know with certainty.  In the economic dynamic vision, “law creates a temporally extended commitment to a better future.” (Driesen p. 52). Read More

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FAA Appeals Drone Decision

Last week, an administrative law judge invalidated a fine against Raphael Pirker by the Federal Aviation Administration for using a small drone for a commercial purpose.  I discuss the basis for the decision–in short, that the FAA implied that the type of craft Pirker was using was subject only to non-binding guidance–over at Forbes.  In that post and elsewhere, I cautioned drone start ups and others to wait and see what the FAA does in response to the ruling before rushing ahead with their idea for a drone-based business.  Today the FAA announced it was, in fact, appealing the decision.

How the appeal fares may depend on the way the appeals court characterizes the decision.  In issuing rules, the FAA has to follow the strictures of the Administrative Procedure Act, including issuing notice and soliciting comment.  The judge at one point refers to a defect in the FAA’s public notice concerning “unmanned aerial systems.”  According to the judge, “Notice 07-01 does not … meet the criteria for valid legislative rulemaking,” due to defects in title (not called an “Notice of Proposed Rulemaking” or “NPRM”) and timing (not issued 30 days in advance).  My understanding is that courts review procedural defects de novo under the APA.  Now, if an appellate court upholds the administrative judge’s decision on this basis, then the FAA loses authority to regulate drones in general, but only until they follow the proper procedure to create valid rules.

If the basis is that the FAA misinterpreted its own rules, however–i.e., the agency was wrong to sweep the drone Pirker was operating into its definition of “aircraft”–then arguably Seminole Rock / Auer deference applies.  Auer has faced its share of criticism, as my colleague Kathryn Watts explores in a forthcoming article in Georgetown Law Journal.  But it remains the law of the land, and requires courts to uphold agency interpretations unless they are “plainly erroneous” or else inconsistent.  I don’t see the FAA’s decision to include unmanned aircraft systems as aircraft as plainly erroneous.  Otherwise, you could simply replace the pilot of a cargo plane with a robot and suddenly the plane falls outside the authority of the FAA.  But the FAA’s decision could be inconsistent: As the administrative judge notes, official FAA communications repeatedly treat some categories of “model aircraft” or “modelers” separately than other UAS.

The basis of the invalidation of the fine could be a procedural defect, an inconsistent interpretation, or both.  The ruling is not entirely clear.  We will have to wait and see how the court reacts to the FAA’s appeal.  And even if the court upholds the judgment, we should probably expect a drone NPRM from the FAA to follow.  Those of you with deeper training in administrative law should feel free to jump in.

CLARIFICATION (March 13, 2014): Peter Sachs of Drone Law Journal points out that the first layer of appeal here is to a five-member panel of administrative judges.  They could in theory clarify the basis of the decision (or overrule it) before the case heads to an Article III court.  Thanks, Peter!