Category: Administrative Announcements

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Attention Prawfs in NYC for AALS: the Annual Prawfs/CoOp Happy Hour

Attention Prawfs in NYC for AALS: the annual Prawfs/Co-Op Happy Hour will be this Friday at 930pm until midnight (at least) at the Hilton “Bridges” Bar. See you then and there, and please pass it on!
As you’ll see from Yelp, we’re apparently prioritizing location and big pours in our selection of venue:
http://www.yelp.com/biz/bridges-bar-hilton-new-york-new-york

Much thanks to the wonderful Dan Markel for organizing it!

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Call for Papers: National Business Law Scholars Conference

The Fifth Annual National Business Law Scholars Conference (NBLSC) will be held on Thursday-Friday, June 19-20, 2014, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles.  I had the honor of giving the keynote address at last year’s event (held at Ohio State) and can attest to an impressive group of scholars, papers, and ideas, in both quantity and quality. They come from across the U.S. and around the world.

The organizers (named below), welcome all scholarly submissions relating to business law. Presentations should focus on research appropriate for publication in academic journals, especially law reviews, and should make a contribution to the existing scholarly literature.  They try to provide the opportunity for everyone to actively participate. Junior scholars and those considering entering the legal academy are especially encouraged to participate.

To submit a presentation, email Professor Eric C. Chaffee at eric.chaffee@utoledo.edu with an abstract or paper by April 4, 2014. Please title the email “NBLSC Submission – {Name}”. If you would like to attend, but not present, email Professor Chaffee with an email entitled “NBLSC Attendance.” Please specify in your email whether you are willing to serve as a commentator or moderator. A conference schedule will be circulated in late May. More information is available here.

Conference Organizers
Barbara Black (The University of Cincinnati College of Law)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven M. Davidoff (The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Seton Hall University School of Law)
Elizabeth Pollman (Loyola Law School, Los Angeles)
Margaret V. Sachs (University of Georgia Law)

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Introducing Thomas Healy

Healy, Thomas (photo credit Sean Sime)[1]I’m pleased to welcome Thomas Healy, who will be guest blogging this month.

Thomas is a professor at Seton Hall Law School, where he teaches constitutional law, federal courts, First Amendment, and criminal procedure.  He recently published “The Great Dissent:  How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind — and Changed the History of Free Speech in America,” which was selected as a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice and which Erwin Chemerinsky called “wonderful and engaging” in a review for California Lawyer.  Thomas began his career as a journalist and was the Supreme Court correspondent for the Baltimore Sun prior to joining Seton Hall.

Welcome Thomas!

 

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Introducing Guest Blogger Richard Storrow

storrowI am delighted to welcome Richard Storrow, Professor of Law at City University of New York School of Law, who will be blogging with us this month. Professor Storrow brings human rights and social justice perspectives to his comparative scholarship on the regulation of assisted reproduction. His recent articles have explored the legal dimensions of crossborder reproductive care, the use of the proportionality principle by European courts reviewing restrictions on assisted reproduction, and the resurrection of illegitimacy classifications in the regulation of international commercial surrogacy. During the fall of 2010, he was a Fulbright Scholar to Spain where he conducted research on the development of the Spanish law of human assisted reproduction. Storrow teaches courses in property, real estate transactions, wills and trusts, family law, and reproductive technology. He is a graduate of Columbia Law School.

Professor Storrow’s recent publications include:

The Proportionality Problem in Cross-Border Reproductive Care, in The Globalization of Health Care: Legal and Ethical Issues (I. Glenn Cohen ed., 2013).

New Thinking on Commercial Surrogacy, 88 INDIANA L.J. 1281 (2013).

Religion, Feminism and Abortion: The Regulation of Assisted Reproduction in Two Catholic Countries, 42 RUTGERS L.J. 725 (2012).

 “The Phantom Children of the Republic”: Surrogacy, Globalization and the New Illegitimacy, 20 AMERICAN UNIVERSITY JOURNAL OF GENDER, SOCIAL POLICY & THE LAW 561 (2012).

Medical Conscience and the Policing of Parenthood, 16 WILLIAM & MARY JOURNAL OF WOMEN & THE LAW 369 (2010).

Therapeutic Reproduction and Human Dignity, 20 LAW & LITERATURE 257-274 (2009).

You can find his SSRN page here.

The Comments Experiment

I just wanted to announce that I am joining Gerard on this policy. I think it will be an improvement over the status quo (for me at least) because:

1) It works for Sullivan. He gives many great comments or responses a high level of prominence. He doesn’t just highlight people who agree with him. He publishes “dissents of the day” that contradict his position in a constructive, interesting, or provocative way.

2) I’ve heard from several people that they would comment, but don’t want to get “drowned out” in the noise of irrelevant comments. So this is a way for them to get some attention for their views.
Read More

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David Gray on the Supreme Court’s Contemporary Fourth Amendment Exclusionary Rule

dgray2Tomorrow, if you are in the D.C. area in the afternoon, Georgetown Law’s American Criminal Law Review, American Civil Liberties Union, and Criminal Law Association are hosting my brilliant colleague David Gray to talk about his article, A Spectacular Non Sequitur: The Supreme Court’s Contemporary Fourth Amendment Exclusionary Rule Jurisprudence (forthcoming in ACLR). His lecture will focus on the Exclusionary Rule and the recent cases involving the 4th Amendment. Location: Hotung 1000. Starts at 3:30 p.m. Will be worth it, indeed. Professor Gray is an illuminating and dynamic speaker.

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Introducing Guest Blogger Zephyr Teachout

I’m delighted to introduce Professor Zephyr Teachout who will be a guest this month. Professor Teachout is an Associate Law Professor at Fordham Law School, where she teaches political law and p20090421_zephyr_teachout_18roperty law. She writes about political law and has just completed a manuscript for Harvard University Press on the meaning of corruption in American law. She is a member of the Board of Center for Rights, the Public Campaign Action Fund, and the Antitrust League. She is the former National Director of the Sunlight Foundation and the Director of Online Organizing for Howard Dean’s 2004 Presidential campaign. She began her career as a lawyer representing people on death row in North Carolina.

 

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Introducing Rachel Godsil

Rachel Godsil is the Eleanor Bontecou Professor of Law at Seton Hall Law School. Her teaching and research interests include race and social science, constitutional law, property, education, and environmental law. Her recent scholarship focuses on implicit bias and the role of perception on public policy decisions and institutional treatment of people of color.  Professor Godsil is a co-founder and research director for the American Values Institute, a national consortium of social scientists and law professors focusing on the role of implicit bias in law and policy. She is currently working on the link between stereotype threat and the success of students of color in law. Professor Godsil has written amicus briefs to the Supreme Court on behalf of research psychologists in the Fisher v. University of Texas and on behalf of the National Parent Teacher Association in the Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District litigation at the Supreme Court. She has written numerous articles and book chapters on issues of race and property and is the co-editor of Awakening From The Dream:  Civil Rights Under Siege And The New Struggle For Equal Justice (Carolina Academic Press, 2005).

Welcome, Rachel!

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Introducing Marc Poirier

Professor Marc R. Poirier is a Professor of Law and the Martha Traylor Research Fellow at Seton Hall University School of Law.  Marc writes and teaches in the areas of property theory, environmental law, administrative law, coastal land use, regulatory takings, and law and sexuality.  Two of Professor Poirier’s articles have won Dukeminier Awards from the Williams Institute at UCLA as among the best articles in the field of law and sexuality and gender identity.  Marc has also been chair of two AALS Sections: (1) Property and (2) Law and Interpretation.  He currently serves on the Society of American Law School’s (SALT) Committee on Issues in Legal Education.

Marc’s work includes:

Brazilian Regularization of Title in Light of Moradia, Compared to the United States Understandings of Homeownership and Homelessness, 44 U. Miami Inter-Am. L. Rev. (2013);

Name Calling: Identifying Stigma and the “Civil Union”/”Marriage” Distinction, 41 Conn. L. Rev. 1425 (2009);

The Cultural Property Claim within the Same-Sex Marriage Controversy, 17 Colum. J. Gender & Law 343 (2008).

Marc’s current works in progress include an article examining why the Boy Scouts of America’s proposed local option compromise on policy towards LGBT membership did not and could not satisfy the concerns of the Scouts’ constituencies; an article arguing that the key issue in the ongoing same-sex marriage controversy is localism, not federalism; and an article on neighborliness, risk, and scale in the management of coastal land.  He is also working on what he hopes will become a book on hate crimes as territory.

Welcome, Marc!

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Introducing Guest Blogger Julie Goldscheid

GoldscheidI am delighted to welcome Professor Julie Goldscheid who will be blogging with us in October. Professor Goldscheid is a Professor of Law at CUNY School of Law, where she teaches courses including civil procedure, lawyering, gender, psychology and law, and gender and the law, and in the family law and equality concentrations.  She writes and speaks widely about gender equality, with a particular focus on gender-based violence and economic equality.  Before joining the CUNY faculty, she held positions including senior staff attorney and acting legal director at Legal Momentum (formerly NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund).  She spearheaded that organization’s legal work to end violence against women, which included defending the constitutionality of the civil rights remedy of the 1994 Violence Against Women Act in courts nationwide, and before the U.S. Supreme Court in United States v. Morrison.  She subsequently served as General Counsel of Safe Horizon, a leading victim assistance, advocacy, and violence prevention organization, where she oversaw its direct service, policy, and governance matters. She has served on the Board of Directors of the Stonewall Community Foundation and other NGO’s, and has been active in bar association committees and task forces.

Professor Goldscheid has served as a Senior Fellow/ Sabbatical Visitor at the Center for Gender and Sexuality Law at Columbia Law School, and as a Visiting Scholar at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.  She is a graduate of New York University School of Law, from which she was awarded a “Recent Graduate Award.”

Her recent publications include:

The Parallel Processes of Law & Social Change: Gender Violence and Work in the United States and South Africa, chapter in Martha Fineman & Estelle Zinsstag, ed, Transitional Justice (2013).

Gender and Equality Law (Edited volume, Ashgate Publishing, 2013).

Rethinking Civil Rights and Gender Violence, 14 Geo. J. Gender & L. 43 (2013).

Elizabeth M. Schneider, et al., Implementing the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights’ Domestic Violence Ruling, 46 Clearinghouse Rev. J. L. & Pol’y 113 (July-Aug. 2012) (author of section of article).

Disparate Impact’s Impact: The Gender Violence Lens, 90 Ore. L. Rev. 33 (2011).

You can find her SSRN page here.