Category: Administrative Announcements

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Introducing the Legal Roundup Project

I’m pleased to announce the launch of our Legal Roundup Project.  The goal of the Legal Roundup Project is for Concurring Opinions to become a central hub where people can learn about the highlights of different fields.

We have invited academics in a variety of fields to post roundups of key scholarship, cases, events, news, and developments in their fields.  Far too often, we can get so immersed in our own fields that we might miss out on useful ideas, debates, developments, cases, and scholarship in other fields.

We have asked participating scholars to focus on the developments and scholarship in their field that would be most relevant and interesting for everyone, not just to write primarily for others in their field.

Over the next few months, we plan to expand the project to cover more fields.  We hope that you will find the Legal Roundup Project to be useful and interesting.

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Welcoming Back Guest Blogger Ryan Calo!

I’m thrilled to welcome back Professor Ryan Calo whose work on robotics, information privacy, and cyber law is as creative asCaloRyan it is cutting-edge. Professor Calo is an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Washington and the inaugural faculty director of the Tech Policy Lab, an interdisciplinary research group that bridges the School of Law, Information School, and Computer Science and Engineering. He is also an affiliate scholar at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society. Presentations over the last year include testifying before the United States Senate on the domestic use of drones and participating in the Federal Trade Commission workshop on the Internet of Things. His current project seeks to bridge cyberlaw with robotics.

His most recent publications include:

Ryan Calo, Digital Market Manipulation, 82 Geo. Wash. L. Rev. (forthcoming 2014)

Ryan Calo, Code, Nudge, or Notice?, 99 Iowa L. Rev. 773 (2014)

Welcome back, Ryan!

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Job Opportunity: Associate Dean, GW Law’s Econ/Finance Program

The George Washington University Law School seeks an Associate Dean and Program Director for its Center for Law, Economics & Finance (C-LEAF). C-LEAF is a think tank within the Law School, designed as a focal point in Washington, DC, for the study and debate of major issues in economic and financial law confronting the United States and the global community.

Minimum Qualifications: Master’s degree in an appropriate area of specialization and a minimum of 5-7 years of professional or administrative experience. An advanced degree  and experience in legal education is highly preferred.  Extensive knowledge and understanding of business and finance law policy. Previous experience in program administration and fund raising is essential.

To apply, please visit The George Washington University employment site, posting number 003171.

Deadline for applications is March 30, 2014.

The George Washington University is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

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Welcome to Ron Collins

Collins-Ron 02I’m delighted to announce that Ron Collins will be posting here on a regular basis.  Ron is the Harold S. Shefelman scholar at the University of Washington Law School and a senior fellow at the Newseum’s First Amendment Center in Washington, D.C. He was a Supreme Court Fellow in 1982-83 under Chief Justice Warren Burger and a law clerk to Oregon Supreme Court Justice Hans Linde. He is the book editor at SCOTUSblog.

Collins is the author, co-author, or editor of several books including: When Money Speaks: The McCutcheon Case, Campaign Financing Laws, and The First Amendment (e-book, Spring, 2014) Ÿ On Dissent: Its Meaning in America (Cambridge, 2013) Ÿ Mania: The Story of the Outraged & Outrageous Lives that Launched a Cultural Revolution (Top-Five Books, 2013) Ÿ Nuance Absolutism: Floyd Abrams & the First Amendment (Carolina Academic Press, 2013) Ÿ We Must not be Afraid to be Free (Oxford, 2011) Ÿ The Fundamental Holmes (Cambridge, 2010) Ÿ The Trials of Lenny Bruce (Sourcebooks, 2002, 2012) Ÿ and  Constitutional Government in America (Carolina Academic Press, 1980). He has authored over 60 scholarly articles including publications in Harvard Law Review Ÿ Stanford Law Review Ÿ Supreme Court Review Ÿ Michigan Law Review Ÿ Texas Law Review Ÿ Duke Law Journal Ÿ and the Southern California Law Review. He has also authored over 250 articles in the popular press including articles in the New York Times Ÿ Washington Post Ÿ Los Angeles Times Ÿ and The Nation.

In 2003, Collins and others successfully petitioned the governor of New York to posthumously pardon Lenny Bruce. In 2010, Collins was a fellow in residence at the Norman Mailer Writers Colony in Provincetown, Massachusetts. In 2011 he received the Supreme Court Fellow’s Administration of Justice award “in recognition of his scholarly and professional achievements in advancing the rule of law.” And in 2012, the American Society of Legal Writers awarded him a Scribes Book Award (bronze) for We Must not be Afraid to be Free.

His areas of interest are First Amendment law, constitutional law, legal history, and jurisprudence.

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Introducing Margaret K. Lewis

Maggie LewisMaggie Lewis joined Seton Hall Law School as an Associate Professor in 2009. She is a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a Public Intellectuals Program Fellow with the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, and an Affiliated Scholar of NYU School of Law’s U.S.-Asia Law Institute. Her recent publications have appeared in the Columbia Journal of Transnational Law, NYU Journal of International Law and Politics, Columbia Journal of Asian Law, and Virginia Journal of International Law. She is also the co-author of the book Challenge to China: How Taiwan Abolished Its Version of Re-Education Through Labor with Jerome A. Cohen.  You can read some of Maggie’s work here.

Most recently before joining Seton Hall, Professor Lewis served as a Senior Research Fellow at NYU School of Law’s U.S.-Asia Law Institute where she worked on criminal justice reforms in China. Following graduation from law school, she worked as an associate at the law firm of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton in New York City. She then served as a law clerk for the Honorable M. Margaret McKeown of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Diego. After clerking, she returned to NYU School of Law and was awarded a Furman Fellowship.

Welcome, Maggie!

 

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Introducing Guest Blogger Margaret Hu

I am delighted to introduce Professor Margaret Hu who will be guest blogging with us this month. I’ve blogged about her superb work here, and it is such a honor to have her aboard.

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Professor Hu is an Assistant Professor of Law at Washington and Lee University School of Law, and joined the faculty in 2013. Her research interests include the intersection of immigration policy, national security, cybersurveillance, and civil rights.  Previously, she served as senior policy advisor for the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and also served as special policy counsel in the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices (OSC), Civil Rights Division, U.S. Department of Justice, in Washington, D.C. Professor Hu’s work has been published in the Indiana Law Journal and the U.C. Davis Law Review.
Professor Hu holds a B.A. from the University of Kansas and a J.D. from Duke Law School. She is a Truman Scholar and a Foreign Language Area Studies Scholar. She clerked for Judge Rosemary Barkett on the U.S. Court of Appeals, Eleventh Circuit, and subsequently joined the U.S. Department of Justice through the Attorney General’s Honors Program.
Here are links to her work:

 

 

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Welcoming Back Ari Waldman

We are thrilled to welcome back Professor Ari Ezra Waldmanpicture_002_-_version_2-1.jpg to the blog! Professor Waldman is Associate Professor and Director of the Institute for Information Law and Policy at New York Law School and the Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. His research focuses on privacy, online hate and harassment, and digital aspects of intellectual property law. His doctoral dissertation, tentatively titled, “Privacy as Trust,” is a study of online sharing behavior and it’s implications for privacy law and policy. He is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Harvard College.

His recent publications include:

Durkheim’s Internet: Social and Political Theory in Online Society, 7 N.Y.U. J. LAW & LIBERTY 355 (2013)

Marriage Rights and the Good Life: A Sociological Theory of Marriage and Constitutional Law, 64 HASTINGS L. J. 739 (2013)

All Those Like You: Identity Aggression and Student Speech, 77 MISSOURI L. REV. 563 (2013)

Hostile Educational Environments,71 MARYLAND L. REV. 705 (2012)

Tormented: Anti-Gay Bullying in Schools, 84 TEMPLE L. REV. 385 (2012)

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Introducing Guest Blogger Aníbal Rosario Lebrón

I am delighted to welcome Aníbal Rosario Lebrón who will be blogging with us this month.  Professor Rosario Lebrón is a Puerto Rican law professor, linguist, and Aníbal Rosario Lebrónphotographer. He is currently the Ralph S. Petrilli Distinguished Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Louisville School of Law.  He graduated with a B.S. in Biology and a J.D. from the University of Puerto Rico. Professor Rosario Lebrón’s teaching career began at the University of Puerto Rico School of Law where he taught for three years as an Adjunct Professor and served as an adviser for the Trial Advocacy Association and coach for the Law School’s trial advocacy teams. He also taught in the Pre-Law Program of the Interdisciplinary Studies Department of the Liberal Arts College of the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus. After receiving his LL.M. in Legal Theory from New York University School of Law, Professor Rosario Lebrón taught for three years as a Visiting Assistant Professor at Hofstra University. Professor Rosario Lebrón’s research examines how certain narratives are used in Family Law, Criminal Law, and Evidence to subdue various groups based mainly on their gender and sexual identities. Professor Rosario Lebrón is also committed to closing the educational achievement gap and has worked on numerous initiatives toward this end.

Professor Rosario Lebrón’s recent publications include:

For Better and for Better: The Case for Abolishing Civil Marriage, 5 Wash. U. Jur. Rev. 189 (2013).

La juridificación de la familia y su construcción como ente apolítico [The Juridification of the Family and its Construct as a Non-Political Entity], Revista Electrónica del Instituto de Investigaciones Ambrosio L. Gioja, Año V, Número Especial, 616 (2011).

De invisibilidad, torceduras y rectitud, todas las familias tenemos un poco [All families are a bit queer, invisible, and straight], Revista Cayey Núm. 89:71 (noviembre 2009).

La revolución dentro de la revolución: Una mirada a la situación de la mujer en la Cuba socialista [The Revolution within the Revolution: A Perspective on the Condition of Women in Socialist Cuba], 75 REV. JUR. UPR 731 (2006).

You can find his SSRN page here.

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Welcome Corey Yung

PortraitPlease welcome back Corey Yung (of Kansas).  Corey has blogged for us previously, and we’re so pleased to have him back.

Corey is an Associate Professor at the University of Kansas School of Law. His scholarship primarily focuses on sexual violence, substantive criminal law, and judicial decision-making. Yung’s academic writings have been cited by state and federal courts, including the Supreme Court of the United States. Before Yung began his professorial career, he served as an associate for Shearman & Sterling in New York and clerked for the Honorable Michael J. Melloy of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit.

Recent Articles:

How to Lie with Rape Statistics: America’s Hidden Rape Crisis, 99 Iowa Law Review (Forthcoming, 2014)

A Typology of Judging Styles, 107 Northwestern University Law Review 1757 (2013)

The Incredible Ordinariness of Federal Penalties for Inactivity, 2012 Wisconsin Law Review 841 (2012)

Beyond Ideology: An Empirical Study of Partisanship and Independence in the Federal Courts, 80 George Washington Law Review 2 (2012)

Flexing Judicial Muscle: An Empirical Study of Judicial Activism in the Federal Courts, 105 Northwestern University Law Review 1 (2011)