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Category: Administrative Announcements

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Introducing Guest Blogger Meghan Ryan

I am thrilled to introduce Professor Meghan Ryan who will be guest blogging with us this month. Professor Ryan, who is Assistant Professor of Law at SMU, teaches and writes at the intersection of criminal law and procedure, torts, and law & science. Her current research focuses on the impact of evolving science, technology, and cultural values on criminal convictions and punishment, as well as on civil remedies.

Professor Ryan received her A.B., magna cum laude, in Chemistry from Harvard University in 2002. In 2005, she earned a J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Minnesota Law School, where she was a member of the Order of the Coif and received the American Law Institute-American Bar Association Scholarship and Leadership Award. She was also a member of both the Minnesota Law Review and the Minnesota Journal of Global Trade.

After graduation, Professor Ryan clerked for the Honorable Roger L. Wollman of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. She also worked as Prof Ryanan associate in the trial group at the Minneapolis-based law firm of Dorsey & Whitney LLP, where she focused her practice on commercial and intellectual property litigation, as well as on white collar defense and compliance. Additionally, Professor Ryan has conducted research in the areas of bioinorganic chemistry, molecular biology, and experimental therapeutics at the Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota. Prior to joining the SMU faculty, Professor Ryan was a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota Law School, where she taught Criminal Law, Criminal Process, and Sales.

Professor Ryan’s fascinating work includes:

Science and the New Rehabilitation (work in progress).

Juries and the Criminal Constitution, 65 Ala. L. Rev. __ (forthcoming 2014).

Finality and Rehabilitation, 3 Wake Forest J.L. & Pol’y __ (forthcoming 2014) (invited symposium contribution)

Death and Rehabilitation, 46 U.C. Davis L. Rev. 1231 (2013).

The Missing Jury: The Neglected Role of Juries in Eighth Amendment Punishments Clause Determinations, 64 Fla. L. Rev. 549 (2012).

Proximate Retribution, 48 Hous. L. Rev. 1049 (2012).

Remedying Wrongful Execution, 45 U. Mich. J.L. Reform 261 (2012).

Judging Cruelty, 44 U.C. Davis L. Rev. 81 (2010).

Does the Eighth Amendment Punishments Clause Prohibit Only Punishments That Are Both Cruel and Unusual?, 87 Wash. U. L. Rev. 567 (2010).

Does Stare Decisis Apply in the Eighth Amendment Death Penalty Context?, 85 N.C. L. Rev. 847 (2007).

Can the IRS Silence Religious Organizations?, 40 Ind. L. Rev. 73 (2007).

Role of Carboxylate Bridges in Modulating Nonheme Diiron(II)O2 Reactivity, 42 Inorganic Chemistry 7519 (2003) (with Miquel Costas, et al.).

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Introducing Guest Blogger Kathryn Fort

I am delighted to welcome Kathryn E. Fort who will be blogging with us this month. Ms. Fort is the Staff Attorney for the IndigenousKate 2 Law and Policy Center at Michigan State University College of Law. She joined the Center in 2005 as the Indigenous Law Fellow. In her role with the Center she teaches both an experiential learning class and traditional classes in federal Indian law, researches and writes on behalf of Center clients, and manages administrative aspects of the Center. She is also the director of the QUICWA Collaborative Court Monitoring Program for Oakland and Ingham Counties. Ms. Fort has written articles on laches and land claims, and the Indian Child Welfare Act. Her publications include articles in the George Mason Law Review, Saint Louis University Law Journal, and American Indian Law Review. She co-edited Facing the Future: The Indian Child Welfare Act at 30 with Wenona T. Singel and Matthew L.M. Fletcher (Michigan State University Press 2009). She also co-edits the popular and influential Indian law blog, TurtleTalk.

Ms. Fort graduated magna cum laude in from Michigan State University College of Law with the Certificate in Indigenous Law, and is licensed to practice law in Michigan. She received her B.A. in History with honors from Hollins University in Roanoke, Virginia.

Her recent publications include:

Tribal Disruption and Indian Claims (with Matthew Fletcher and Nicholas J. Reo), 112 Mich. L. Rev. First Impressions (2014)

The Vanishing Indian Returns: Tribes, Popular Originalism, and the Supreme Court, 57 St. Louis U. L.J. 297 (2013)

Indian Children and Their Guardians Ad Litem (with Matthew Fletcher), 95 Boston University Law Review Annex 59 (2013)

Waves of Education: Tribal-State Court Cooperation and the Indian Child Welfare Act, 47 Tulsa L. Rev. 529 (2012)

Disruption and Impossibility: New Laches and the Unfortunate Resolution of the Iroquois Land Claims in Federal Court, 11 Wyoming L. Rev. 375 (2011)

You can find her SSRN page here.

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Welcome Back, Professor Robert Tsai

rtsaiIt is with great pleasure that I re-introduce Professor Robert Tsai. Robert has blogged with us before, and we are lucky to have him back to blog about his work, ideas, and I hope his new book America’s Forgotten Constitutions: Defiant Visions of Power and Community. I met Robert when we are at Yale Law School together. He was sharp and engaged then and has not slowed down since. He has held two clerkships — Hugh H. Bownes, U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, and Denny Chin, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. He has litigated constitutional issues before federal and state courts. As a professor his papers have twice been selected for the Stanford-Yale Junior Faculty Forum: once in constitutional theory and once in constitutional history. Professor Tsai began his academic career at the University of Oregon and then joined the law faculty of American University in 2008 and was promoted to full professor the following year. Welcome back, Robert.

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Welcoming Back Jeffrey Kahn to the Blog

This month, we are lucky to have Professor Jeffrey Kahn back with us for another guest blogging stint. Professor Kahn joined the SMU Law faculty in Fall 2006.  He teaches and writes on American constitutional law, Russian law, human rights, and counterterrorism.  In 2007-2008, he received the Maguire Teaching Fellow Award from the Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility at SMU for his seminar, “Perspectives on Counterterrorism.”  In 2008-2009, he was named a Colin Powell Fellow of the John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies. In 2010, he received SMU’s Outstanding Faculty Award, a university-wide award given each year to a junior, tenurefaculty-kahn-track faculty member for excellence in teaching, curricular development, and scholarship.  In 2011, the year he was tenured and promoted to associate professor, he received the Law School’s Excellence in Teaching Award.

His latest research on U.S. legal topics focuses on the right to travel and national security law.  His most recent book, Mrs. Shipley’s Ghost: The Right to Travel and Terrorist Watchlists(University of Michigan Press, 2013), critically examines the U.S. Government’s No Fly List.  Among other publications, his articles have appeared in the UCLA Law ReviewMichigan Law Review, and the peer-reviewed Journal of National Security Law and Policy.

Professor Kahn has been incredibly busy since his last guest visit. This past fall, he was the third O’Brien Fellow-in-Residence at the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism at McGill University’s Faculty of Law.  This semester, he is a Visiting Professor at Washington & Lee School of Law. Professor Kahn recently served as a testifying expert witness in the first federal trial of the constitutionality of the No Fly List and federal watchlist system.  The plaintiff, Rahinah Ibrahim, won the bench trial and the Justice Department decided not to appeal (having lost two prior appeals in the case to the Ninth Circuit). The paperback edition of his book on terrorist watchlists, Mrs. Shipley’s Ghost: The Right to Travel and Terrorist Watchlists(University of Michigan Press, 2013), is scheduled for release later this spring.

Professor Kahn’s latest work is a contribution forthcoming in a title in Springer’s Ius Gentium series edited by ABA President James Silkenat.  The essay evaluates Russian rule-of-law shortcomings through the lens of my experience as one of the experts selected by former Russian Constitutional Court Justice Tamara Morshchakova to contribute a report on the conviction of Russian oil oligarch Mikhail Khodorkovsky, who was recently released.

 

 

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Managing Collateral Negative Consequences

Arden Rowell asks about how the economic dynamic approach would take into account tradeoffs as it manages change over time. The book eschews the term “tradeoff” in favor of a more limited concept, “collateral negative consequences.” (p. 70). This shift was intentional, meant to emphasize that society’s commitment to avoiding systemic risk should be just that, a commitment. Therefore, the primary question governments should ask in seeking to avoid systemic risk is which measures will do so effectively. (pp. 69-70). Democracies often make a concrete normative commitment to avoiding systemic risk, just as we make a commitment to free speech. The very idea of commitment means that we must take the steps needed to meet the commitment, even if they are costly to us. Therefore, I reject the concept of tradeoffs as a signal for some kind of optimization exercise that ignores normative commitments in favor of a more subtle concept of addressing collateral negative consequences that seeks to take certain qualitative detriments of actions addressing systemic risk into account without weakening our commitment to this goal.

The idea of commitment implies that the question of how much investment should we make to avoid systemic risk is not the right question to ask. It’s a little like asking how much investment should we make in our marriage. It’s not unbounded, but basically we try to do what is necessary to make the marriage work.

Having said that, the book, as Arden notes, does not eschew consideration of collateral negative consequences. Here are some of the principles stated in the book:

  1. If one has two efficacious means of avoiding a systemic risk, choose one avoiding  negative collateral    consequences if possible.  (p. 70)
  2. Use narrow exceptions to legal rules where possible to avoid collateral negative consequences when implementing an efficacious means of avoiding systemic risk. (p. 71)
  3. If all efficacious means have serious negative collateral consequences, make value choices about which collateral consequences we most wish to avoid in choosing a set of efficacious means. (p. 70)
  4. If necessary to avoid a systemic risk, one must forego an economic opportunity, that’s ok. If we avoid systemic risks, new opportunities will arise. (p. 72).
  5. Avoid measures that would not leave open a reasonably robust set of economic opportunities. (p. 72).
  6. If the only measure avoiding systemic risk creates a systemic risk, avoid the systemic risk most likely to arise. (p. 72). Read More
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Introducing Christine Corcos

Corcos 01I’m very pleased to announce that Professor Christine Corcos will be keeping us updated regularly about Law & Humanities as well as Media Law.

Christine is the Richard C. Cadwallader Associate Professor of Law at the Louisiana State University Law Center and a member of the Women’s and Gender Studies Faculty at Louisiana State University A&M. She is the co-author of La Politique du Logement aux Etats-Unis (1999), the author of An International Guide to Law and Literature Studies (Hein, 2000) and editor of Law and Magic: A Collection of Essays (Carolina Academic Press 2010). She has written numerous law review articles and essays including George Carlin, Constitutional Law Scholar, and Visits to a Small Planet: Rights Talk in Some Science Fiction Film and Television Series From the 1950s to the 1990s, for the Stetson Law Review, Some Thoughts on Chuck Lorre, “Bad Words,” and the “Raging Paranoia of Our Network Censors,” in the Regent Law Review, From Agnatic Succession to Absolute Primogeniture: The Shift to Equal Rights of Succession to Thrones and Titles in the Modern European Constitutional Monarchy, for the Michigan State Law Review, an essay on the tv show Damages for the collection Lawyers in Your Living Room (ABA, 2009), Prosecutors and Psychics on the Air: Does a “Psychic Detective Effect” Exist for the collection Law and Justice on the Small Screen (Hart Publishing, 2012), and Magical Images in Law for the collection Explorations in Courtroom Discourse (Ashgate, 2011). She is currently doing some writing in the area of law and religion, particularly on the First Amendment, Spiritualism, and “crafty sciences.”

She is a co-author of several casebooks, including Theater Law (Carolina Academic Press, 2004), Law and Popular Culture (2d ed., LEXIS Publishing, 2012), and Law of the European Union: A New Constitutional Order (2d ed., Carolina Academic Press, 2013). She is Secretary/Treasurer of the Law and Humanities Institute and a member of the Board of Editors of the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law. She also blogs at Media Law Prof Blog, the Law and Magic Blog, the Law and Humanities Blog (for the Law and Humanities Institute) and Feminist Law Professors.

She speaks frequently to the media on media law and law and popular culture.

Areas of interest: First Amendment, Freedom of Expression, Law and Religion, Legal History (including Women’s Legal History), Law and Popular Culture

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Call for Abstracts: The Taslitz Galaxy

I ordinarily don’t post calls for abstracts, but I’ll make an exception for this event to honor the life and work of Andrew Taslitz.  Andy’s work was creative and interdisciplinary; he saw things in ways that nobody else did, and his works were filled with insight.  He was also a wonderfully warm and kind person.  His untimely passing is such a devastating loss, not just for the scholarly community, but also because he was such a generous and genuine friend to so many people, including me.  I will miss him greatly.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

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The Taslitz Galaxy: A Gathering of Scholars at Howard

Howard University School of Law is hosting a conference in honor of Andrew Taslitz. It is not a traditional symposium, for we expect concurrent sessions on many subjects. It is open to people who knew Taz and to those who were inspired by his writing or teaching.

If you would like to take part in this event, please submit an abstract by May 30, 2014 to the co-chairs named below. The conference is free but speakers must pay their own way.

Howard Law Journal is dedicating an issue to Professor Taslitz. If you would like to write a short piece for this issue, let us know when you submit your abstract. First drafts of the paper will be due on August 15, 2014.

GUIDELINES FOR SPEAKING  & WRITTEN ESSAYS

  • The Essays will be short, with a maximum of 10,000 words, including footnotes.
  • We are dividing the proposals into two tracks. The first track involves speaking &/or writing on substantive issues. The second track we are calling “The Tao of Taz,” a more personal approach. Both options are explained below.
  • You may suggest a panel for the gathering.

Read More

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Introducing the Legal Roundup Project

I’m pleased to announce the launch of our Legal Roundup Project.  The goal of the Legal Roundup Project is for Concurring Opinions to become a central hub where people can learn about the highlights of different fields.

We have invited academics in a variety of fields to post roundups of key scholarship, cases, events, news, and developments in their fields.  Far too often, we can get so immersed in our own fields that we might miss out on useful ideas, debates, developments, cases, and scholarship in other fields.

We have asked participating scholars to focus on the developments and scholarship in their field that would be most relevant and interesting for everyone, not just to write primarily for others in their field.

Over the next few months, we plan to expand the project to cover more fields.  We hope that you will find the Legal Roundup Project to be useful and interesting.

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Welcoming Back Guest Blogger Ryan Calo!

I’m thrilled to welcome back Professor Ryan Calo whose work on robotics, information privacy, and cyber law is as creative asCaloRyan it is cutting-edge. Professor Calo is an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Washington and the inaugural faculty director of the Tech Policy Lab, an interdisciplinary research group that bridges the School of Law, Information School, and Computer Science and Engineering. He is also an affiliate scholar at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society. Presentations over the last year include testifying before the United States Senate on the domestic use of drones and participating in the Federal Trade Commission workshop on the Internet of Things. His current project seeks to bridge cyberlaw with robotics.

His most recent publications include:

Ryan Calo, Digital Market Manipulation, 82 Geo. Wash. L. Rev. (forthcoming 2014)

Ryan Calo, Code, Nudge, or Notice?, 99 Iowa L. Rev. 773 (2014)

Welcome back, Ryan!

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Job Opportunity: Associate Dean, GW Law’s Econ/Finance Program

The George Washington University Law School seeks an Associate Dean and Program Director for its Center for Law, Economics & Finance (C-LEAF). C-LEAF is a think tank within the Law School, designed as a focal point in Washington, DC, for the study and debate of major issues in economic and financial law confronting the United States and the global community.

Minimum Qualifications: Master’s degree in an appropriate area of specialization and a minimum of 5-7 years of professional or administrative experience. An advanced degree  and experience in legal education is highly preferred.  Extensive knowledge and understanding of business and finance law policy. Previous experience in program administration and fund raising is essential.

To apply, please visit The George Washington University employment site, posting number 003171.

Deadline for applications is March 30, 2014.

The George Washington University is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.