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Author: Angela Onwuachi-Willig

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The Road to More Minority Partners?

This past weekend, I spoke at Georgetown Law Journal’s symposium on post-racialism. It was a great symposium. Congratulations to the student editors!

The scheduled roundtable discussions during the event focused on diversity in law firms. One of the issues discussed was the low number of minority attorneys, especially partners, at law firms. At many firms, there are no or just one or two minority partners within each racial group (Only 20% of all partners are women.). Even at firms with a more sizeable number of minority associates, those associates tend to leave the firms by the fourth or fifth year. Read More

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Equity or Non-Equity, That Is The Question

Over the past two years, the National Association for Law Placement (NALP) has tried to obtain information regarding the breakdown of equity and non-equity partners by gender and race at law firms. The majority of NALP’s law firm members refused to hand over the information, and NALP eventually gave in on February 12.

The Executive Director of NALP, Andrew Leipold, indicated that most firms cited privacy concerns for not divulging the details of their equity and non-equity partnership breakdowns. According to Leipold, small firms especially worried that providing such information would allow non-equity partners to be easily identified and stigmatized. Read More

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What a “Ghetto” Party at UCSD Can Teach Us About the Importance of Racial Diversity on Campus

Black History Month just ended.  In honor of Black History (or perhaps its end), certain students at the University of California, San Diego decided to leave us with one last lesson about the importance of diversity.

On February 15, 2010, individual members of a fraternity at UCSD held an off-campus party in honor of Black History Month called the “Compton Cookout” (The President of Pi Alpha Kappa criticized the party and asserted that the party was not sponsored or condoned by the fraternity.).  The invitation included references to “dat Purple drank,” which the party creators described as consisting of “sugar, water, and the color purple, chicken, coolade, and of course Watermelon.”   The students sent the invitation via Facebook with dress and behavior requirements for attendees.

Men were asked to be “stuntin’ in ya white T (XXXL smallest size acceptable), anything FUBU. . . .”

Women were asked to come as “ghetto chicks” with “short, nappy hair” (Did we not learn anything from Don Imus?).   The dress and behavior requirements for women were extensive and included the language below:

“For girls: For those of you who are unfamiliar with ghetto chicks-Ghetto chicks usually have gold teeth, start fights and drama, and wear cheap clothes – they consider Baby Phat to be high class and expensive couture. They also have short, nappy hair, and usually wear cheap weave, usually in bad colors, such as purple or bright red. They look and act similar to Shenaynay, and speak very loudly, while rolling their neck, and waving their finger in your face. Ghetto chicks have a very limited vocabulary, and attempt to make up for it, by forming new words, such as “constipulated”, or simply cursing persistently, or using other types of vulgarities, and making noises, such as “hmmg!”, or smacking their lips, and making other angry noises, grunts, and faces. The objective is for all you lovely ladies to look, act, and essentially take on these “respectable” qualities throughout the day.”

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