Author: Sarah Waldeck

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Advising Female Graduates

Hello to everyone and thanks to Dan for inviting me to post this month.

I wanted to begin by noting an article that appeared in today’s New York Times. In it, Lisa Belkin surveys the flood of research on how women in the workplace are viewed differently than men. Belkin’s article cites many studies, all of which will sound familiar—probably because if you haven’t heard of the study she is discussing, you’ve heard of one that had similar results. These studies all boil down to the same conclusion: women are perceived to lack whatever qualities are most valued in the workplace, at least when compared to men who are behaving the same way as their female counterparts.

As Belkin explains, women are advised:

Don’t get angry. But do take charge. Be nice. But not too nice. Speak up. But don’t seem like you talk too much.

She continues:

These are academic and professional studies, not whimsical online polls, and each time I read one I feel deflated. What are women supposed to do with this information? Transform overnight? And if so, into what? How are we supposed to be assertive, but not, at the same time?

Belkin’s article has made me consider what I say to graduating female law students. My gender-specific advice always involves the thorny issue of balancing a legal career and children. I don’t say anything about the situation that all female graduates will find themselves in: that is, being a woman in a legal workplace.

I’m wondering what advice others give on this topic, or what valuable counsel others have received. If you have anything useful, please pass it along.