Author: Sarah Waldeck

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Introducing Professor Mike Zimmer

Mike Zimmer3Mike Zimmer is a Professor of Law at Loyola University Chicago where he teaches labor and employment courses and constitutional law.

Zimmer was awarded the first “Paul Steven Miller Memorial Award for Scholarly Contributions to the Field of Labor and Employment Law” in 2011. His writing focuses on employment discrimination, constitutional law and international and comparative employment law. He is co-author of Cases and Materials on Employment Discrimination (8th ed. 2013), The Global Workplace: International & Comparative Employment Law: Cases & Materials (2nd ed. 2012) and numerous articles in leading law journals and he has presented at many conferences on labor and employment topics.  You can access many of Mike’s articles here.

Mike has had a peripatetic career in teaching. Having taught at the University of South Carolina and Wayne State, he was on the faculty at Seton Hall for 30 years before joining Loyola. He has visited at numerous schools including Northwestern, Illinois, Michigan State, Chicago-Kent and DePaul. Mike also has had a lot of experience teaching American and foreign law students abroad, including in Italy, France, the UK and China.

Welcome, Mike!

 

 

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Introducing Professor Marc Roark

Marc Roark

Marc Roark teaches Property, Commercial Law,  Law and Literature, Law and Society, and Law and Religion at Savannah Law School.   Before joining the faculty at Savannah Law School, Professor Roark held appointments at the University of Missouri, the University of Tulsa, and the University of La Verne.

Marc is a well-known Property scholar, and has appeared nationally in interviews by NPR and MSNBC News.   His articles include Homelessness at the Cathedral (Missouri Law Review) and Payment Systems, Consumer Tragedy, and Ineffective Remedies (St. John’s Law Review). You can sample more of Marc’s articles at his SSRN page.

Marc is currently working on a book project titled unPopular Property, describing the intersection of property and identity in outlier cultures.  He is also working on an article articulating the need for human impact statements as a part of public and private land development.

Welcome Marc!

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Introducing Professor Kenneth Stahl

Kenneth StahKen teaches Land Use, Real Property, and Local Government Law at Chapman University Fowler School of Law, and is the director of the Environmental, Land Use, and Real Estate Law certificate program. Before joining Fowler, Ken spent four years as an Assistant United States Attorney in the Eastern District of New York. Prior to that, he worked as a Trial Attorney for the United States Department of Justice, Office of Constitutional Torts, and as an Associate at the Washington, D.C. law firm of Arnold & Porter.

Ken’s scholarly work focuses on local politics and the relationship between the local political process and judicial doctrine in land use and local government law. Professor Stahl’s articles include Neighborhood Empowerment and the Future of the City, 161 University of Pennsylvania Law Review 939 (2013) and The Suburb as a Legal Concept: The Problem of Organization and the Fate of Municipalities in American Law, 29 Cardozo Law Review 1193 (2008). He also wrote Local Government, “One Person/One Vote,” and the Jewish Question, 49 Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review 1 (2014). This piece was selected as one of the winning papers for the 2012 Junior Faculty Forum at Harvard Law School.

Welcome, Ken!

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Fifth Annual Constitutional Law Colloquium

Loyola University Chicago School of Law will host a Constitutional Law Colloquium on Friday, November 7 and Saturday, November 8, 2014.

This will be the fifth annual Loyola constitutional law colloquium.  Organizers hope to attract constitutional law scholars at all stages of their professional careers to discuss current projects, doctrinal developments in constitutional law, and future goals. The conference will bring together scholars to discuss their works-in-progress concerning constitutional issues, such as, but not limited to Free Speech, Substantive Due Process, Equal Protection, Suffrage Rights and Campaign Finance, Process Oriented Constitutionalism, Constitutional Interpretation, Constitutional Theory, National Security and Constitutional Rights, Due Process Underpinnings of Criminal Procedure, Judicial Review, Executive Privilege, Suspect Classification, Free Exercise and Establishment of Religion, and Federalism. As in years past, there will be many opportunities for the vetting of ideas and for informed critiques. Submissions will be liberally considered, but participation is by invitation only. Presentations will be grouped by subject matter.

Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of California-Irvine School of Law, will be the keynote speaker.

Titles and abstracts of papers should be submitted electronically to constitutionlaw@luc.edu no later than June 15, 2014.

The Law Center is located on Loyola’s Water Tower campus, near Michigan Avenue’s Magnificent Mile, Lake Michigan, Millennium Park, the Chicago Art Institute, and Chicago Symphony Center.

Participants’ home institutions are expected to pay for their own travel expenses. Loyola will provide facilities, meals, and support.

There are numerous reasonably priced hotels within walking distance of the Loyola School of Law and Chicago’s Magnificent Mile.

Conference Organizers:

Professor Barry Sullivan, Cooney & Conway Chair in Advocacy, bsullivan7@luc.edu
Professor Alexander Tsesis, atsesis@luc.edu
Professor Michael Zimmer, mzimme4@luc.edu

Program Administrator:
Heather Figus, ConstitutionLaw@law.edu

 

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Fast Track Your Article Submission

Do you have an article that you want to hit the streets by June?  If so, Seton Hall Law Review has an opportunity that may be right for you.  Here is their announcement:

The Seton Hall Law Review has two remaining spots for Articles in its Third Book of Volume 44, which will be published this June. Authors are encouraged to submit articles through ExpressO or via email (lawreview@shu.edu) as soon as possible.

All topics are welcome, but authors with topics that would benefit from prompt publication are especially encouraged to submit. Because the edits for this issue will begin on February 17, the decision to accept or reject will be made very quickly, and an offer would need to be accepted within 3 days. The first two accepted offers will be chosen for publication.

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Introducing Margaret K. Lewis

Maggie LewisMaggie Lewis joined Seton Hall Law School as an Associate Professor in 2009. She is a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a Public Intellectuals Program Fellow with the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, and an Affiliated Scholar of NYU School of Law’s U.S.-Asia Law Institute. Her recent publications have appeared in the Columbia Journal of Transnational Law, NYU Journal of International Law and Politics, Columbia Journal of Asian Law, and Virginia Journal of International Law. She is also the co-author of the book Challenge to China: How Taiwan Abolished Its Version of Re-Education Through Labor with Jerome A. Cohen.  You can read some of Maggie’s work here.

Most recently before joining Seton Hall, Professor Lewis served as a Senior Research Fellow at NYU School of Law’s U.S.-Asia Law Institute where she worked on criminal justice reforms in China. Following graduation from law school, she worked as an associate at the law firm of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton in New York City. She then served as a law clerk for the Honorable M. Margaret McKeown of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Diego. After clerking, she returned to NYU School of Law and was awarded a Furman Fellowship.

Welcome, Maggie!

 

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Introducing Thomas Healy

Healy, Thomas (photo credit Sean Sime)[1]I’m pleased to welcome Thomas Healy, who will be guest blogging this month.

Thomas is a professor at Seton Hall Law School, where he teaches constitutional law, federal courts, First Amendment, and criminal procedure.  He recently published “The Great Dissent:  How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind — and Changed the History of Free Speech in America,” which was selected as a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice and which Erwin Chemerinsky called “wonderful and engaging” in a review for California Lawyer.  Thomas began his career as a journalist and was the Supreme Court correspondent for the Baltimore Sun prior to joining Seton Hall.

Welcome Thomas!

 

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Introducing Rachel Godsil

Rachel Godsil is the Eleanor Bontecou Professor of Law at Seton Hall Law School. Her teaching and research interests include race and social science, constitutional law, property, education, and environmental law. Her recent scholarship focuses on implicit bias and the role of perception on public policy decisions and institutional treatment of people of color.  Professor Godsil is a co-founder and research director for the American Values Institute, a national consortium of social scientists and law professors focusing on the role of implicit bias in law and policy. She is currently working on the link between stereotype threat and the success of students of color in law. Professor Godsil has written amicus briefs to the Supreme Court on behalf of research psychologists in the Fisher v. University of Texas and on behalf of the National Parent Teacher Association in the Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District litigation at the Supreme Court. She has written numerous articles and book chapters on issues of race and property and is the co-editor of Awakening From The Dream:  Civil Rights Under Siege And The New Struggle For Equal Justice (Carolina Academic Press, 2005).

Welcome, Rachel!

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Introducing Marc Poirier

Professor Marc R. Poirier is a Professor of Law and the Martha Traylor Research Fellow at Seton Hall University School of Law.  Marc writes and teaches in the areas of property theory, environmental law, administrative law, coastal land use, regulatory takings, and law and sexuality.  Two of Professor Poirier’s articles have won Dukeminier Awards from the Williams Institute at UCLA as among the best articles in the field of law and sexuality and gender identity.  Marc has also been chair of two AALS Sections: (1) Property and (2) Law and Interpretation.  He currently serves on the Society of American Law School’s (SALT) Committee on Issues in Legal Education.

Marc’s work includes:

Brazilian Regularization of Title in Light of Moradia, Compared to the United States Understandings of Homeownership and Homelessness, 44 U. Miami Inter-Am. L. Rev. (2013);

Name Calling: Identifying Stigma and the “Civil Union”/”Marriage” Distinction, 41 Conn. L. Rev. 1425 (2009);

The Cultural Property Claim within the Same-Sex Marriage Controversy, 17 Colum. J. Gender & Law 343 (2008).

Marc’s current works in progress include an article examining why the Boy Scouts of America’s proposed local option compromise on policy towards LGBT membership did not and could not satisfy the concerns of the Scouts’ constituencies; an article arguing that the key issue in the ongoing same-sex marriage controversy is localism, not federalism; and an article on neighborliness, risk, and scale in the management of coastal land.  He is also working on what he hopes will become a book on hate crimes as territory.

Welcome, Marc!

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Introducing Christine Kexel Chabot

Christine ChabotI am pleased to welcome Christine Kexel Chabot, who will be guest blogging during the month of July.  Christine is a lecturer at Loyola University Chicago School of Law, where she has taught since 2010.

Christine’s empirical research focuses on judicial decision-making.  For example, a recent Hastings Law Journal article analyzes the Senate’s ability to constrain presidents’ choices of Supreme Court nominees over an extended period. Her working paper, Schooling the Supreme Court, makes use of a unique period when Justices who attended law school sat with Justices who entered the profession by reading the law alone.

Before coming to Loyola – Chicago, Christine practiced in the Ann Arbor and Chicago offices of leading national law firms and clerked for the Hon. Jane R. Roth of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.  Her interest in judicial decision-making stems from her appellate and telecommunications litigation experience.

Welcome Christine!