Author: Dave Hoffman

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On Blawg Comments

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Now that this blawg is a little over two months old, we’re starting to get spammed with some frequency in the comments. I take this to be sort of like a toddler learning to crawl. It is chaotic, messy, and time-consuming in the short-term, but signals long-term progress.

However, it got me to thinking about a comment policy. Although we, unlike some, allow comments, we don’t exactly have an easy to find comment (removal) policy. Nor do we have a “diary” system which would permit our visitors to create their own content. With respect to the former non-policy, we’re like ACSBlog, Althouse, Opinio Juris, among others. No blawgs to my knowledge have a diary system.

Before discussing why, it is worth canvassing the field.

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Faculty Recruitment Practices

Brian Leiter has this interesting recent post on some high-pressure AALS faculty recruitment practices. Coincidentally, I just received an email from the “AALS Special Committee on Faculty Recruitment Practices,” which states, in relevant part:

The special committee’s specific charge was to determine whether, in light of [certain] complaints, something like a statement of good practices in faculty recruitment was appropriate. Of course, a prerequisite first step in fulfilling that charge is determining what practices are occurring and whether or not they are sufficiently problematic in frequency and type that a statement of good practices is necessary or appropriate. To that end, a survey of current practices seemed appropriate. Hence, this email message, which is being sent to faculty members who participated in the faculty recruitment conference within the past two years and are now full-time faculty members at an ABA approved law school/AALS member law school. We know that you are very busy individuals.

Busy, yes. But not too busy to blog.

My guess, based on anecdotes from the law clerk hiring process and discussions about international norms with colleagues, is to doubt that AALS will succeed at stamping out abuse in the absence of a real enforcement hammer. But you’ve got to give them credit for trying, because the current market is set-up to produce some unhappy marriages between candidates and schools.

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Wex

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Cornell Law School’s Legal Information Institute recently launched WEX, “a collaboratively built, freely available legal dictionary and encyclopedia.” Sounds peachy. What is it?

According to an email which has been circulating from the Tom Bruce, Director of the LII [who kindly gave me permission to quote]:

At the risk of sounding a little more diffident than perhaps I should, I’ll say that we’ve just put something sorta new and very interesting on the LII site. It’s called WEX, and we are hoping that it will grow into a very ambitious and interesting project indeed — interesting and ambitious enough that we should be trumpeting it from the housetops, I suppose, but for the moment we’re confining ourselves to low-key conversations with our friends and supporters. Hence this note.

WEX . . . will be the first collaboratively edited legal encyclopedia and dictionary on the web, aimed specifically at law novices.

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David Giacalone on the FTC’s Price Gouging Statement

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David Giacalone has a nice new post up about the FTC’s recent position statement against a federal price gouging law. I had missed this development last week.

According the FTC’s chairperson, “[e]nforcement of the antitrust laws is the better way to protect consumers.”

As a first take, I think I agree that there is no pressing need for yet more federal regulation of economic activity, especially where states are both capable, and in this case motivated, to take care of the “problem” themselves. This is particularly true in this context, where the harms attributed to price gouging are localized and fleeting.

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Unauthorized Practice on Craigslist?

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I was recently browsing Craigslist’s Legal Forum. On that forum, folks post legal problems and others answer them. Some of the answering posters identify as lawyers, but do not provide their names.

The forum describes itself as follows:

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DISCLAIMER – craigslist is not responsible for, and you may not rely upon, the accuracy of any information or advice posted here – this forum is provided for educational and entertainment purposes only – you should consult with an attorney prior to acting on any information found here.

Will such boilerplate really protect CL if, say, the PA Bar were to seek an injunction again the discussion group for hosting the unauthorized practice under 42 PA C.S.A. 2524? Or if the Bar were ask the attorney general of Pennsylvania to seek criminal penalties under that section’s misdemeanor provisions? I’m imagine that CL would try to avoid liability by pointing to the “Terms of Use” provisions on the page, but do such disclaimers survive a Grokster-like analysis? Maybe Dan’s analysis of suing wikipedia would throw some light on this problem. I haven’t been able to find much in the legal ethics literature on this problem – and some might argue that state bars have enough on their hands without investigating internet practice.

Obviously, what constitutes the practice of law is a matter for debate, and you should feel free to visit the site yourself and make your own mind up.

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Saddam’s Host of Lawyers

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Via Drudge, I hear that 1,100 lawyers are leaving Saddam Hussein’s defense team because of security fears. But Saddam’s trial will go on.

I lack expertise in the Iraqi security situation and legal system, and so I’m left with a (perhaps naive) question: why does Saddam need over a thousand lawyers? [And how did the team apparently grow by 1,089 lawyers over a few weeks?] Only three explanations come to mind.

1. Saddam plans to mount a meticulous defense to the charges on the merits, and needs hundreds of attorneys to comb through the evidence against him, interview witnesses, and develop a coherent legal strategy.

2. Saddam plans to win at trial by hook-or-crook, and has employed a host of lawyers as a first step in rebuilding his empire of patronage and client relationships.

3. Saddam is not in control of his legal team. The person who is plans to use the opportunity as first step in building an empire of patronage and client relationships.

Possibility #1 is a joke; #2 is delusional; #3 is just sad.

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Sex Sells Contracts: Why Not Securities Law?

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The ContractsProf Blog recently posted about “Sex and Contracts.” Frank Snyder notes that the post resulted in a huge traffic spike. “There’s a lesson there,” he concludes. There sure is.

I could (as this blog did) identify a case or so that directly appeals to your prurient interest in the topic. But maybe the better path is to take a step back, and consider a more academic question.

Let us assume that you, a general counsel, have just learned that your CEO is having a consensual affair with a subordinate. Also assume that the corporation has recently stated, in a regular reporting statement, that its management team is “cohesive, ethically sound, and 100% committed to shareholder value.” [Note: this is entirely hypothetical]

Putting aside other considerations, is it likely that a court or jury would find it materially misleading to have omitted disclosure of the affair?

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Back from the Hiring Conference

I just returned from the AALS hiring conference. Temple saw some wonderful folks, including several confessed readers of this blog.

Because of the swirl of events, I didn’t get to see others who I would have liked to, even though I did mill around the Friday night reception for that very purpose! (For a pre-conference take on whether going to such receptions makes sense, see here.) Despite Al and Mike‘s fashion tips, I admit to not wearing a tie. And that is about as much as I think I can say about the experience, as the deliberative process privilege probably applies to the rest of what went on.