Pioneer of Cover Art Dies

Deven Desai

Deven Desai is an associate professor of law and ethics at the Scheller College of Business, Georgia Institute of Technology. He was also the first, and to date, only Academic Research Counsel at Google, Inc., and a Visiting Fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy. He is a graduate of U.C. Berkeley and the Yale Law School. Professor Desai’s scholarship examines how business interests, new technology, and economic theories shape privacy and intellectual property law and where those arguments explain productivity or where they fail to capture society’s interest in the free flow of information and development. His work has appeared in leading law reviews and journals including the Georgetown Law Journal, Minnesota Law Review, Notre Dame Law Review, Wisconsin Law Review, and U.C. Davis Law Review.

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8 Responses

  1. Orin Kerr says:

    **
    The covers to almost any Blue Note album evokes a special moment in style and vibe.
    **

    Yes, Reid Miles was a genius. I recommend this book of Blue Note cover art.

    Or just go here and start scrolling:
    http://www.birkajazz.com/archive/blueNote4000.htm

  2. Lawrence Cunningham says:

    Cool post Deven!

  3. Think too of Cream’s Disaeli Gears, or It’s a Beautiful Day, or Neil Young’s Harvest, or Traffic’s The Low Spark of High-Heeled Boys, or Janis Joplin’s Cheap Thrills, or the Kinks’ Arthur–Or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire, or several Grateful Dead covers, or Santana’s Abraxas, the Beatles’ Yellow Submarine….

  4. oops: “Disraeli Gears”

  5. See too the jacket cover for We Insist! Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite New York: Candid Records, 1960. Record jacket. Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division. (9-6) Courtesy of Candid Production, LTD

    Image: http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/odyssey/archive/09/0906001r.jpg

  6. Marc Blitz says:

    Nirvana’s “Never Mind” — http://sleevage.com/nirvana-nevermind/
    (Here is the Bart Simpson version: http://wallpapers.jurko.net/pic/10100/)

    King Crimson’s “In the Court of the Crimson King” – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Court_of_the_Crimson_King

    The sleeve for the Super Furry Animals’ single Herman ♥’s Pauline, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermann_♥%27s_Pauline, as well as the other cover art created for them by Pete Fowler.

    Baby Astronauts’ “All the Pancakes You Can Eat” — each album cover had 1/1000th of a painting by the Baby Astronauts — http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=1309181 and
    http://www.discogs.com/Baby-Astronauts-All-The-Pancakes-You-Can-Eat/release/1309181

    and one with an interesting IP law story going with it:

    The original cover art for the Sufjan Steven’s album “Come on Feel the Illinoise.” The record company had to cover up with a balloon sticker, and ultimately remove, the picture of Superman on the front because of the copyright issues. Or so says Wikipedia: See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois_(album)

  7. Ken Rhodes says:

    Wow! Opened the door to a room in my mind that I hadn’t visited in a few years!

    Seeing the “Kind of Blue” cover immediately brought to mind the one I think of as its fraternal twin, “Round About Midnight.” Seldom in the record industry did album covers epitomize “onomatopoeia of the picture” like those Miles Davis covers. Now that I think of it, so did “Sketches of Spain.” I see the picture and the horn talks to me.

    Thanx.

  8. Marc Blitz says:

    Nirvana’s “Never Mind”

    King Crimson’s “In the Court of the Crimson King”

    The Super Furry Animals’ single Herman ♥’s Pauline, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermann_♥%27s_Pauline, as well as the other cover art created for SFA by Pete Fowler.

    Baby Astronauts’ “All the Pancakes You Can Eat” — each album cover had 1/1000th of a painting by the Baby Astronauts
    http://www.discogs.com/Baby-Astronauts-All-The-Pancakes-You-Can-Eat/release/1309181

    and one with an interesting IP law story to go with it:

    The original cover art for the Sufjan Steven’s album “Come on Feel the Illinoise.” The image of Superman flying over Chicago had to be covered with a balloon sticker, and ultimately removed entirely, thanks to copyright concerns.