BRIGHT IDEAS: Helen Nissenbaum’s Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life

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10 Responses

  1. Orin Kerr says:

    “At the same time, I’m buoyed by the growth in size and quality of privacy scholarship and practice, the guile, brilliance, and insubordination of computer hacker and NGO players”

    I’m curious how the guile, brilliance, and insubordination of computer hackers is supposed to be great for privacy. Maybe there are terms of art being used here, but if a hacker refers in the widely-used sense to one who gains access to the private spaces of others without authorization, I would think hacking hurts privacy. not helps it.

  2. Helen Nissenbaum says:

    For some time, I’ve been trying (probably vainly) to resuscitate the meaning of “hackers” — per Steven Levy’s 1984 “heroes of the computer revolution” — as ardent, excellent, prolific, if fanatical programmers, driven by the challenge of the craft and an anti-establishment ornariness, as much as anything else. (Long story, of course.) Ed Felten’s “tinkerer” though less controversial seems to lack the interesting edginess.

    Your question is on-point.(Thanks.) No, I didn’t mean people who break into other people’s systems and damage them. I meant, for example, the thousands of programmers who have built apps and extensions, free alternatives, develop open code, etc.

  3. Marmar says:

    my question for Ellen is that when I read the book I found some simple aspects such as (social life, education, people daily life ) was explained with exaggeration in the text. besides, “privacy” is a complex term and while reading the book I found that your analysis is addeding mor complexity to the issue. readers as I beleive need to have comprehensive logic idea about privasy without difficulties. Some ideas in my opinion are not clear, so many theories were used and are not very related to the topic(going beyond the issue)

  4. howto says:

    My hope level is in constant. When I think of the vast backend of information aggregators interacting directly and indirectly with personal information, such as Google, Choicepoint, ISPs, government agencies, and financial dconglomerates, I fear the worst. I worry that the landscape of incentives will swamp just about any moral consideration we might bring to bear. At the same time, I’m buoyed by the growth in size and quality of privacy scholarship and practice, the guile, brilliance, and insubordination of computer hacker and NGO players. Thanks

  5. howto says:

    Hi, Thanks for the information published. Very helpful

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  9. Furni Remo says:

    BRIGHT IDEAS: Helen Nissenbaum’s Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life is great piece of work. Thank you