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Student Control

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21 Responses

  1. Hale Adams says:

    I thought a person stopped being subject to the doctrine of “in loco parentis” when he turned 18.

    And the do-gooders wonder why we are raising a generation that acts like children well into their 30s?

    A message to the manangement of private companies and universities: How about treating adults as adults? Think that might work?

  2. Occam's Beard says:

    Where is this concern with turning out good citizens when hiring and tenuring extremists advocating or praising anti-American violence (e.g., Ward Churchill)?

  3. pashley says:

    There is some scope for this. I’m thinking of Christian-professing universities regulating the social behavior of their students. On the other hand, the almost certain proponents will be state universities, and the almost certain beneficiaries will be the grievance industry. So, for example, state-sponsored teaching courses have imposed participation in collectivist political action to pass required classes. Shades of Marxist-Lennism.

  4. Prague says:

    Well, it can’t help when the community itself doesn’t cooperate. I’m thinking in particular of the town where I went to college, when the local porn store’s sign advertised a ten percent discount to local college students….

  5. Prague says:

    Well, it can’t help when the community itself doesn’t cooperate. I’m thinking in particular of the town where I went to college, when the local porn store’s sign advertised a ten percent discount to local college students….

  6. koblog says:

    There was a time when going to college or–sniff–university meant becoming more refined than the rude world one left back at the farm.

    It meant learning how to comport oneself in even simple things like eating, dressing, speaking…and the now-foreign concept of self-discipline.

    Most importantly, one was to learn something of history, letters, language, law, economics, theology and civilization.

    Sadly, today, amid oceans of “studies” courses that lead nowhere, those former noble goals seem only to fall to better Christian schools and the military schools like West Point and the Naval and Air Force Academies.

    University for a great many is a time of extended adolescence, binge drinking and sexual experimentation.

    Academically, college is little more than what high school once was as evidenced by the number of “bonehead” classes that are offered just to get incoming freshmen up to speed on the basics, followed by dropping out.

    The Christian and military schools endeavor to teach their students that they have a duty to a higher calling.

    What concerns me about social monitoring at state schools is their utter lack of moral compass and their stated goal to destroy (“deconstruct”) Western Civilization using political correctness.

  7. Johnnie says:

    Clearly this code is directed at non-approved political opinions, but is the left going to support this when the university starts discouraging drug use, promiscuity, abortion, and the especially unhealthy and dangerous homosexual behavior. What could be a greater threat to the Univerity community than an uncureable fatal disease?

  8. Jonathan says:

    How about treating adults as adults?

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! Where do you think that the dean of student life and his various minions will find employment then?

    Of course, it’s not entirely their rent-seeking that infantilizes students. Anything happens to a student, either on campus or off, and the university faces a big fat lawsuit.

  9. Jonathan says:

    Compelling them, of course, to regulate every facet of student interaction.

  10. I say let the students make the mistakes while they are young and still have the parentals to watch out for them. If you want them to be good citizens they need to be good taxpayers first. The university should provide students the skills to succeed in the real world; any other skills they develop are just icing on the cake.

  11. MMan says:

    Time for the students to start spying on the faculty and staff and posting evidence of any questionable behavior on the internet. Preferably youtube.

  12. Mike M. says:

    What of the older students? Not every college student is a drunken teenager…and if I were a veteran in my mid-20s, the idea of some collegiate bureaucrat trying to monitor my private life would be extremely offensive.

  13. There’s a vague Orwellian tinge here, but it’s not quite enough to set off alarm bells, I think. The article says that students are pretty much getting in trouble when they break laws, including noise ordinances, local alcohol regulations, and other misdemeanors. In the outside world, wouldn’t an employer react similarly if an employee were found violating local laws?

  14. Taxi1 says:

    I don’t see an Orwellian tinge at all. No one is spying, they’re just reacting to what occurs in the plain light of day. You can visit the website of any University town newspaper and see in the courts section which 19-20 year old has been arrested for what crimes. Reminds me of the bumper sticker, “If you don’t like my driving, stay off the sidewalk.”

    I see a University that recognizes there is more to the education process than 120 credits laid out in a predetermined 3 credit per class schedule and taught by profs that only interact with students in their classes and are otherwise uninvolved. Students at universities often remind me of 2 year olds going for the cookie jar who haven’t yet figured out the sound travels around corners, or that the police blotter in the local rag gets read by many and that their behavior has consequences to others beyond themselves. Better they learn it in school. If they prize anonymity for drunken debauchery save it for spring break at Panama City

    Mike at PSU

  15. RM says:

    Employees aren’t paying their employers for the honor of getting to work.

    The student/college relationship is nothing like the employee/employer relationship.

    If the college starts paying students $4000/month to attend, then maybe they would have the same right to react as an employer would.

  16. RM says:

    >>>>I see a University that recognizes there is more to the education process than 120 credits laid out in a predetermined 3 credit per class schedule.

    Re-education, perhaps. But definitely not education. You are paid to teach facts, not to impose your morality.

  17. Taxi1 says:

    >>>> If the college starts paying students $4000/month to attend, then maybe they would have the same right to react as an employer would.

    >>>> Re-education, perhaps. But definitely not education. You are paid to teach facts, not to impose your morality.

    Let’s see just what the students are paying for. On Penn State’s website is this easily accessible doc covering student conduct policy:

    http://www.sa.psu.edu/ja/pdf/PoliciesRules.PDF

    Which includes these words…When students are found responsible for behavior off-campus that both

    meets the definition of affecting a Substantial University Interest, and violates the Code of Conduct, sanctions

    will be applied…

    The Pennsylvania State University is dedicated to maintaining a scholarly community that promotes intellectual

    inquiry and encourages the expression of diverse views and opinions. When students accept admission to Penn

    State, they accept the rights and responsibilities of membership in the academic and social environments of that

    community. Students are expected to support its essential values and to maintain a high standard of conduct that

    may exceed federal, state, or local requirements.

  18. I don’t have a problem with it as long as the same monitoring on and off campus is applied equally to the faculty and staff?

    No one is perfect and thus damn few people in the world can stand constant scrutiny of their actions.

  19. Taxi1 says:

    >>>> No one is perfect and thus damn few people in the world can stand constant scrutiny of their actions.

    >>>> Posted by: incongruities

    Just how often are you getting yourself arrested? I’ve managed to “withstand that scrutiny” for 48 years so far.

  20. A.J. Sutter says:

    The AP story has another interesting nugget:”Some universities take their discipline policies a step further. At Duke University, the campus code requires students to report misbehavior by their fellow students to campus officials, no matter where the students find themselves.”

    Is this really teaching the right values? If, as this story suggests, this is an affirmative duty to report (as distinguished from a duty not to commit perjury, for example), do the folks at Duke really think a Stasi society is the right direction for America?

    Consider this too in the light of the Penn State language Taxi1 reports, where students are deemed to accept the code of conduct when they accept admission. How many people who get accepted to a good school are going to base their acceptance decision on the code of conduct, especially when weighing that against the pressure to get a degree from the most prestigious institution possible in order to get a job? When the institution makes this sort of claim about the student’s “acceptance” of the code, does it turn the code of conduct into a contract of adhesion?

    On other topics: (i) Pace koblog, law and economics — and probably some of the other items on his list — were not part of traditional general education requirements at university. Latin, Greek, often theology (pre-20th Century), maybe eventually history or letters. Or can koblog cite some counterexamples? (ii) as for James Hirtsch’s sensing “a vague Orwellian tinge here, but it’s not quite enough to set off alarm bells”: some people might disagree about whether the universities’ activity is “Orwellian” or not, but to sense that it is, and yet not be bothered by that, seems like a sort of complacency that would warm Big Brother’s heart.

  21. Micha Elyi says:

    I’m with the Bearded One’s wisdom (01:40 PM) on this issue. The droids of so-called higher education are making themselves into public spectacles of low-life hypocrisy. Again.

    Obviously the USA is spending way, way too many tax-taken dollars on schemes to subsidize college schooling. I suggest that if these subsidies evaporated those campus administrators would be finding real jobs to do.

    By the way, aren’t these the same herd of campus big-wigs who now bleat that we must again lower the legal boozing age to 18 because they can’t control illegal recreational drug* use on their own campuses? By the way, I remember when campus administrators thought that lowering the legal boozing age to 18 was a *bad* idea. How times change — and not always for the better.

    * Alcohol is the USA’s most popular recreational drug.

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