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An Apology

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10 Responses

  1. “O, oatmeal raisin cookie, is any cookie loved as much as you?”

    No.

  2. Jeff Lipshaw says:

    Oatmeal raisin is a mere pretender compared to the far more cosmopolitan, elegant, chic, and tasty oatmeal dried cherry.

  3. shg says:

    Lipshaw must be a metrosexual. Oatmeal raisin rules the trenches.

  4. Mack O'Roon says:

    Not all cookie love is equal; it’s just like the evil oatmeal raisin cookie to inspire an outpouring of twisted passions. To quote:

    Oatmeal raisin, you’re the worst

    You’re cookie city’s Bensonhurst

    A blazing passion let misshape

    And insolate the tasty grape.

    I applaud your courage in speaking out.

  5. Mack O'Roon says:

    Not all cookie love is equal; it’s just like the evil oatmeal raisin cookie to inspire an outpouring of twisted passions. To quote:

    Oatmeal raisin, you’re the worst

    You’re cookie city’s Bensonhurst

    A blazing passion let misshape

    And insolate the tasty grape.

    I applaud your courage in speaking out.

  6. Sarah Lawsky says:

    Mack O’Roon: Who wrote that? It is sheer genius. Please refer me to other work by the same author.

  7. To paraphrase Seinfeld when discussing the merits of carrot cake, ‘Oatmeal — why is that a cookie?’

    I like oatmeal as oatmeal, as porridge. Why that belongs in a cookie — with raisins, no less, which are the root of all evil — is mystifying to me. Chocolate, brown suger, butter — these are a few of my favorite things.

    Begone, oatmeal raisin cookies.

  8. Mike O'Shea says:

    Those are some nice looking oatmeal raisin cookies in the pic. There’s a distinctive pleasure to the well-made oatmeal raisin: the satisfaction of an unglamorous task carried out with due thought and care.

    All that said, yeah, I reach for the chocolate chip first.

    Here’s another example of a good with the characteristic Sarah was thinking about in her original post: a desirable choice that is typically presented in a context where it is the least desirable of several options.

    Fun size Almond Joy candy bars. My old law firm had an annual Halloween trick-or-treat event: people’s kids would dress up and go office-to-office on each floor. Very cute, and since it was a big firm, the kids ended up with LOTS of quality candy. (Seriously, I was kind of envious on behalf of my younger self.)

    My offering was fun size candy bars. I learned that the Kit Kats, Reeses cups, Heaths, etc., would all disappear while most of the Almond Joys were still untouched. But by the end of the afternoon the bowl was empty.

  9. Mike O'Shea says:

    Those are some nice looking oatmeal raisin cookies in the pic. There’s a distinctive pleasure to the well-made oatmeal raisin: the satisfaction of an unglamorous task carried out with due thought and care.

    All that said, yeah, I reach for the chocolate chip first.

    Here’s another example of a good with the characteristic Sarah was thinking about in her original post: a desirable choice that is typically presented in a context where it is the least desirable of several options.

    Fun size Almond Joy candy bars. My old law firm had an annual Halloween trick-or-treat event: people’s kids would dress up and go office-to-office on each floor. Very cute, and since it was a big firm, the kids ended up with LOTS of quality candy. (Seriously, I was kind of envious on behalf of my younger self.)

    My offering was fun size candy bars. I learned that the Kit Kats, Reeses cups, Heaths, etc., would all disappear while most of the Almond Joys were still untouched. But by the end of the afternoon the bowl was empty.

  10. Jeff Lipshaw says:

    This was on my e-mail today from the Association for Law, Culture, and the Humanities.

    CFP: Food, Culture, and the Law

    The field of food studies has grown enormously over the last

    decade, as evidenced in part by the steadily increasing number

    of academics and professionals in the humanities, social and

    nutrition sciences, culinary arts, and hospitality studies who

    have become engaged in cross-disciplinary conversations about

    food. Operating in tandem with the explosion of popular

    fascination with food, these conversations have been joined of

    late by academics, attorneys, and activists who are

    particularly concerned with the question of how our

    relationship to food is, has been, and should be, mediated

    through law. In response to this emerging area of inquiry, we

    are soliciting both conference papers and publishable essays

    that integrate multidisciplinary scholarship in food studies

    with legal scholarship related to food in existing fields such

    as agricultural, constitutional, criminal, administrative,

    tort, intellectual property, and international trade law.

    Among the questions we hope to answer are: How might one

    account for the law’s varying treatment of food over time

    and/or cross-culturally? What role does law play in shaping

    cultural ideas about food production, trade, and consumption?

    And, inversely, what role does food play in shaping ideas

    about the law?

    Initially we seek papers written from a variety of

    perspectives appropriate for presentation at one or both of

    the following conferences: the Association for the Study of

    Law, Culture, and the Humanities (Suffolk University Law

    School, Boston, April 3-4, 2009) and the Association for the

    Study of Food and Society (details for the 2009 conference TBA

    on the ASFS website). Although we aim to use these panels as

    a partial foundation for creating the edited collection, we

    are also happy to consider abstracts and articles from

    potential contributors who are unable to attend either ASLCH

    or ASFS. Finished essays should be of a quality suitable for

    publication with an established university press and

    reasonably accessible to a multidisciplinary audience of

    scholars and students of the law, social sciences, and

    humanities, as well as interested readers outside the academy.

    Topics can include, but are not limited to:

    Intellectual property rights in food and recipes

    Prison food, e.g., hunger strikes & force feeding, Nutraloaf

    Last meals

    Food torts, e.g. exploding sodas, fingers in chili, coffee in

    the lap

    Regulation of food, alcohol, and/or obesity

    Dietary laws and regulations in different cultures

    History of dietary laws and regulations

    Geographical indications of origin

    Farm subsidies and international trade law

    Linguistic classification of food, e.g., kosher, 1st Growths,

    Organic

    Sumptuary laws

    Famine and famine aid

    Labeling, packaging, and branding

    Rationing

    Food stamps

    Ethanol production and the food supply

    Illegal food production, commerce, and consumption

    Agricultural nuisance and zoning law

    Food and environmental law

    Please submit a paragraph author’s bio and an abstract of no

    more than 500 words to Doris Witt (doris-witt@uiowa.edu),

    Chris Buccafusco (cjb@law.uiuc.edu), AND Amy Dillard

    (adillard@ubalt.edu). Abstracts for ASLCH are due by Oct. 1,

    2008; abstracts for ASFS or for the essay collection alone are

    due by Jan. 15, 2009. Please indicate clearly whether the

    abstract is for ASLCH, ASFS, the essay collection, or some

    combination thereof. Finished essays should be approximately

    10,000 words in length and will be due on or before January 1,

    2010.

    In advance of submitting an abstract, please feel free to

    contact Doris Witt, Christopher Buccafusco, or Amy Dillard

    with any questions about the conference panels or the essay

    collection.

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