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This is Your Brain on … the New York Times

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2 Responses

  1. Jeremy,

    I agree wholeheartedly. But given the power of science as a cultural legitimator, which risk do you think is more likely — that the power of neuroimaging techniques will be oversold or undersold? As I do some work in neuroethics, I think the former. The history of medical imaging in the courtroom itself supports this view, as the same discourse is evident in Golan’s excellent work of X-ray evidence.

    Plus, and in the interests of disclosure I should note that this topic is central to my dissertation on pain, one ought never underestimate the significance of the visible in our cultural discourse. Clinical images bestow remarkable social and cultural capital, which makes grand claims based on the use of such imaging all the more likely, IMO.

  2. Jeremy,

    I agree wholeheartedly. But given the power of science as a cultural legitimator, which risk do you think is more likely — that the power of neuroimaging techniques will be oversold or undersold? As I do some work in neuroethics, I think the former. The history of medical imaging in the courtroom itself supports this view, as the same discourse is evident in Golan’s excellent work of X-ray evidence.

    Plus, and in the interests of disclosure I should note that this topic is central to my dissertation on pain, one ought never underestimate the significance of the visible in our cultural discourse. Clinical images bestow remarkable social and cultural capital, which makes grand claims based on the use of such imaging all the more likely, IMO.