Regulating Private Military Companies

Deven Desai

Deven Desai is an associate professor of law and ethics at the Scheller College of Business, Georgia Institute of Technology. He was also the first, and to date, only Academic Research Counsel at Google, Inc., and a Visiting Fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy. He is a graduate of U.C. Berkeley and the Yale Law School. Professor Desai’s scholarship examines how business interests, new technology, and economic theories shape privacy and intellectual property law and where those arguments explain productivity or where they fail to capture society’s interest in the free flow of information and development. His work has appeared in leading law reviews and journals including the Georgetown Law Journal, Minnesota Law Review, Notre Dame Law Review, Wisconsin Law Review, and U.C. Davis Law Review.

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1 Response

  1. scared says:

    I look forward to reading your piece. I have been skimming the special issue of the ICRC Review on this issue; one article is available here:

    http://www.icrc.org/Web/Eng/siteeng0.nsf/html/review-863-p573

    Also, this may be of interest:

    http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2007/11/halliburton200711?printable=true&currentPage=all

    “Qui tam cases from Iraq are investigated by an F.B.I. unit in Rock Island, Illinois. According to Grayson, the unit has a “standing order” to get approval from the attorneys at Vinson & Elkins before questioning anyone at Halliburton or KBR. “F.B.I. agents are not supposed to politely ask permission,” he says. “The most common interview technique by the F.B.I. is a knock on your door at nine o’clock at night. They’re not allowed to do that when it comes to Halliburton and KBR employees.” (In its e-mailed statement, the D.O.J. said it cannot comment on how any Iraq case has been investigated; Vinson & Elkins did not respond to a request for comment.)”