Court Citation of Blogs: Updated 2007 Study

Dave Hoffman

Dave Hoffman is the Murray Shusterman Professor of Transactional and Business Law at Temple Law School. He specializes in law and psychology, contracts, and quantitative analysis of civil procedure. He currently teaches contracts, civil procedure, corporations, and law and economics.

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3 Responses

  1. One of the interesting things about citing to a blog posting is not only that the blog may disappear, but that it can be changed. Edited. After the citation. What thenOne of the interesting things about citing to a blog posting is not only that the blog may disappear, but that it can be changed. Edited. After the citation. What then<

  2. One of the interesting things about citing to a blog posting is not only that the blog may disappear, but that it can be changed. Edited. After the citation. What then?

  3. Sam says:

    I searched for and read these citations, so I would like to make a few observations. Only in a few of the citations did the courts actually quote from the blog posts. Quoting could solve the editing problem to some extent, because even if the blog post is not static, the original quote would appear in the case. A few of the citations included the date that the blog was accessed. This should probably be required for citing blog posts, as well as any internet source. However, finding the posts (whether they are original or not) can be a problem. Only a few of the cases cited the date of the post. All provided links to the post, but in many cases the links did not work and I looked in the blog archives.