Ticket Scalping Crackdown in Boston

You may also like...

3 Responses

  1. Frank says:

    I guess a lot depends on how the tickets are originally distributed. I can see the following rationale for anti-scalping laws: let’s say the Red Sox want to assure that some die-hard, but poor, fans can get tickets. If scalping is banned, then only that subset of fans is going to jump through the hoops (i.e., calling a hundred times, or waiting overnight for tickets) to get them if they are rationed via nonprice mechanisms.

    If, on the other hand, scalping is allowed, the “diehard” subset will be joined by the “profit-minded” subset. So the diehards’ chance of getting tickets will go down.

    Of course, the wealthy have a way of getting around this, too; in DC, the number of bought-and-paid-for “placeholders” in line for Congressional committee hearings was ridiculous when I was there.

    There’s probably very little way of stopping commodification here other than awarding cheap tix on the basis of, say, an essay contest, and checking ID (just like with plane flights) when somebody uses them.

  2. Jacob Smith says:

    I just do not get the moral outrage on scalping. Somehow we have the concept that we have a right to buy a ticket from the source and noone else should make a profit from that. Since when is capitalism a bad thing?

    When someone buys a house and sells it for profit (house flipping) we give them a cable TV show. What takes more money out of the working mans pocket – the profit a house flipper made or the profit a ticket broker made. Housing is a need. Red Sox games are a want. Where is the moral outrage against the house flipper? What is the difference between the two? Each buys low and sells, or trys to, high.

    I am a part-time ticket broker. I learned how to do it from Greg Cox. His site is http://www.MyTicketBiz.com. He taught me how to do it and gives me the information after I bought the startup kit so I can keep up to date.

  3. Jacob Smith says:

    I just do not get the moral outrage on scalping. Somehow we have the concept that we have a right to buy a ticket from the source and noone else should make a profit from that. Since when is capitalism a bad thing?

    When someone buys a house and sells it for profit (house flipping) we give them a cable TV show. What takes more money out of the working mans pocket – the profit a house flipper made or the profit a ticket broker made. Housing is a need. Red Sox games are a want. Where is the moral outrage against the house flipper? What is the difference between the two? Each buys low and sells, or trys to, high.

    I am a part-time ticket broker. I learned how to do it from Greg Cox. His site is http://www.MyTicketBiz.com. He taught me how to do it and gives me the information after I bought the startup kit so I can keep up to date.