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Scrabble and Law French

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13 Responses

  1. Dave says:

    That’s very odd. So where do they draw the line? There are lots of French words that came into the English language more recently than trover and replevin: Oxford says trover came in the 16th century, “entrepreneur” and “entree” in the 19th, and I assume entree and entrepreneur are acceptable Scrabble words. I can see an argument for not allowing “fuit” or “dit” from your example above, since they’re no longer in English usage today. But trover and replevin are, so I don’t see the distinction between them and other words of more recent provenance.

  2. William Baude says:

    Also odd because I’m pretty sure “vox” is on the official scrabble word list for tournament and other play.

  3. Dave says:

    Just looked in my Scrabble dictionary: trover, replevin, and detinue are all there too.

  4. Nate Oman says:

    I clearly need to invest in the official scrabble dictionary.

  5. Nate, who did you say was “intensely competitive” at Scrabble? You seem to be giving your in-laws a run for their money! However, I side with them on the general principle that just because a word is not French, that does not make it English. Pig Latin is not Latin; that fact does not make it English.

  6. Andrea says:

    Haha, I was just coming here to say VOX and TROVER are acceptable. As fun as it is to argue, in Scrabble there’s really only one question: Is it in the OSPD? You need to grab a paperback OSPD 4th edition from the bookstore, stat!

    p.s. “Dit” is also good – like Morse code dits and dots.

  7. Bruce Boyden says:

    If “ursprache” is English, why not “verboten”?

  8. Sarah says:

    Ah, the irony of Scrabble fanatics out-rulesing a contracts professor.

    I’d accept “verboten” but none of the other words given here, but then, that’s probably why I don’t bother with Scrabble.

  9. Salil Mehra says:

    Is it just me (if I read this right), or does it seem to be going out of one’s way to amputate his right hand for gibbeting before hanging him?

    It has echoes of the punishment for treason, although I guess they didn’t disembowel him.

  10. Bored Frog says:

    Oh really. This is TOO dull.

    Clearly the person doesn’t actually own an OSPD.

    It’s rather simple to find all these words, or most of them, as the earlier posts indicate.

    http://www.hasbro.com/scrabble/pl/page.tools/dn/home.cfm

    Please don’t waste our time with your trivial mono-linguistic banter. You’re like one of my undergrads who asks me to translate a word, when the dictionary is on the shelf…. a la “what is the French word for….?” bah humbug

  11. pee on me says:

    pee on me. French or English?

  12. Hobbit says:

    English is a mega-aglutinive language. If you wish to be stodgy, you may suscribe to the philosophy of the Academie Francais and hasten the death of the language. If a constuct is used by an English speaker and understood by other English speakers, it is likely to be English. Nuff said.

    Khobkhun kha! Anne

  13. Hobbit says:

    English is a mega-aglutinive language. If you wish to be stodgy, you may suscribe to the philosophy of the Academie Francais and hasten the death of the language. If a constuct is used by an English speaker and understood by other English speakers, it is likely to be English. Nuff said.

    Khobkhun kha! Anne

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