Blogging Without Tenure

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12 Responses

  1. Ideoblog says:

    Blogging: distraction from what?

    Dan Solove and Paul Caron have really useful takeoffs on the AALS panel on Blogging: Scholarship or Distraction. Dan’s post includes links to prior blog discussion on the subject, including mine, and I’ll just incorporate those by reference. The big

  2. Cathy says:

    Re: Prof. Barnett’s warning, if untenured law profs shouldn’t blog, what about current (or past) law students? Are we inadvertantly undermining a potential career path by doing this?

    (My gut feeling, however, is that in several years blogging may turn out to be an expectation, for which a prof candidate would need to provide a good reason for why they hadn’t done it.)

  3. Lawprof Blogging: Scholarship or Distraction?:

    Paul Caron has a post summarizing the panel discussion on lawpof blogging at the AALS conference this past week. The panelists were Victor Fleischer, Larry Solum, Denn…

  4. Blogging and Scholarship:

    As Orin noted, on Friday, I spoke on “Blogging and Scholarship” at a panel sponsored by the Section on Scholarship of the Association of American Law Schools. Here …

  5. PrawfsBlawg says:

    Scholarship or Distraction?

    This past Friday I sat in on a AALS panel discussion (Blogging: Scholarship or Distraction?) that Brooks earlier mentioned here. The indefatigable Paul Caron has a very comprehensive post about the session, which I’ve reprinted after the jump. I wanted…

  6. The Scholarly Pros And Cons Of Blogging

    Law blogs are a staple on the Internet these days, and the Association of American Law Schools recognized as much at its annual conference in Washington last week. The agenda included a discussion on the scholarly merits of blogging. Check…

  7. cfw says:

    1. Good blogging is probably more valuable, in the near-term, than law review articles, or law books, yes? Eg, VC or Instapundit can sell what they do, monetize it, at market values well above the market values obtainable for the law review articeles and books generated. This will no doubt create conflict and perhaps jealousy. I suppose an argument can be made that it helps the individual but not the faculty as a whole or the academy. I consider this a weak argument. In fact, I suspect the successful bloggers in VC and Instapundit will help draw applicants, donors and new faculty to their schools.

    2. Argument that long form scholarship is not suitable for the blog is true to a point. But professors can and should be like Churchill, who combined short form articles, letters, memos, notes and such into over 50 books, winning the Nobel prize. What is the point of having deep knowledge of the 9th Amendment that cannot be explained in less than 80 pages? A truly useful scholar should be able to mash what he knows or is thinking into small bits, or long passages, like Churchill.

    3. Law review and book focused tenure decisions are no-doubt too narrow.

  8. Blogs and Scholars

    Paul Caron’s summary of the “blogging” panel at last week’s AALS conference includes this summary of Larry Solum’s remarks:

    He then listed seven ways in which blogs are important for legal scholarship:

    Internet-time (v. …

  9. PrawfsBlawg says:

    Scholarship or Distraction?

    This past Friday I sat in on a AALS panel discussion (Blogging: Scholarship or Distraction?) that Brooks earlier mentioned here. The indefatigable Paul Caron has a very comprehensive post about the session, which I’ve reprinted after the jump. I wanted…

  10. atopian.org says:

    Blogging and academia

    Ironic, that the day after I write what is probably the most mindless comment yet on this site, Crooked Timber brings up the subject of academic blogging once more.

    continues below the fold..

  11. Blogging without tenure

    I regard blogging by an academic without tenure as working without a net: Worthwhile, but risky. On the one hand, if you’re at a place where your political and/or scholarly views as expressed in a blog might result in you

  12. The Last Post of Juan Non-Volokh:

    I joined the Volokh Conspiracy in the spring of 2002. Eugene invited me to join the group as he the blog evolved from the Volokh Brothers to the Volokh Conspiracy. I was still new to academia, so Eugene suggested that I might w…