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Telling Tales Out of School: When Principals Out Their Students

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11 Responses

  1. John Anderson says:

    I concur: even if privacy is not absolute, an expectation of privacy remains. Else military plans, for example, known to hundreds of officers would not be expected to remain unknown to the enemy.

  2. meep says:

    I don’t see why a minor has any right to privacy from their parents. Especially if she’s openly behaving in a particular way in a public place.

  3. Garrett says:

    I highly disagree with meep. Being a minor myself, there are things I believe I have the right to keep private from my parents. Especially things about how I spend my money. It is my money and my privacy and my parents don’t have to know anything about it.

  4. joe says:

    Garrett,

    That is funny – a minor who has his own money. How much do you pay for rent and groceries?

  5. Bruce says:

    “People often reveal secrets within various social networks but don’t expect that information to travel beyond the boundaries of the network.” Right — and in addition, the harms of escape beyond the network are far greater for information captured in certain media, such as video or e-mails. That’s what explains, I think, some of the troubling nature of the “internet shaming” cases you blogged about yesterday. Part of the extreme nature of, say, the Star Wars Kid’s harm is not just that his classmates found out about what he does in private, but the entire world did, and it is permanently recorded now.

  6. Adam says:

    Meep,

    Privacy from one’s parents, and the ability to explore their identity that such privacy gives teens, is an important part of growing up. See Turkle’s Life on the Screen, or Schoeman’s Philisophical Dimensions of Privacy.

  7. John Armstrong says:

    One thing in this description is very murky: was she openly gay at school but made a point that she wasn’t out to her family, or was she acting in a way that a reasonable man might assume that she was out to everyone and the outing was an honest accident?

    I’m willing to give her a separate right to privacy from parents, but it’s on her to make that point clear. The principal cannot be expected to guess what is and is not to be kept secret.

  8. Brendt says:

    I certainly hope that no one is surprised by any of this. After all, the Ninth Circus ruled in this same state last month that the government has sole control over a child’s sexuality, and the parents have no rights whatsoever.

  9. California Court Overprotects Teen Privacy

    Over at Concurring Opinions, the always-interesting Dan Solove has a neat post up about a privacy case arising out of a California high school, which the New York Times covered last week. The case involves a homosexual teenager who was

  10. California Court Overprotects Teen Privacy

    Over at Concurring Opinions, the always-interesting Dan Solove has a neat post up about a privacy case arising out of a California high school, which the New York Times covered last week. The case involves a homosexual teenager who was

  11. results says:

    The ruling has just come in and the principal and school district won on all counts of the case. Maybe people should have waited to hear the facts before spouting all their opinions. It turns out Gay teenagers are just as capable of lying as straight teenagers. There’s a reason why all of the witnesses called by the ACLU were her best friends.

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