I don’t know why Jack Chin says Goodbye; the Virginia Legislature Says Hello

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4 Responses

  1. Goodbye Jim Crow?

    Al Brophy has posted an interesting piece at Concurring Opinions.  Professor Brophy writes:  "In a recent issue of Constitutional Commentary, Gabriel J. Chin has a very thoughtful article, “Jim Crow’s Long Goodbye,” [21…

  2. In Consideration of Modern Vestiges of Jim Crow

    Virginia’s Department of Historic Resources has a statutorily mandated fund specifically for the preservation of the graves of Confederate soldiers. Professor Al Brophy discusses the state funding in his review of Professor Gabriel J. Chin’s recent art…

  3. Mike Hill says:

    Professor Brophy’s insight into the Virginia Legislature’s love for historical cemetaries, specifically that of the Civil War, is quite compelling. However, the Civil War, itself, is a historical byproduct. The funding attributed to the upkeep of the cemetary, in a less pessimistic view, is more of a contribution to history, not a contribution to a particular viewpoint (i.e. slavery). The only agreement that surfaces from Civil War historians is that many good able bodied men sacrified their lives for their strongly held beliefs. (Albeit, slavery, economics, Northern Aggression, federalism, etc.) For this and only this reason should the Virginia legislature continue to fund the Civil War cemetaries.

    Additionally, Professor Brophy supports the funding of the Revolutionary War Cemetaries for the just reason that we ought to remember our ancestors. Bravo! I agree with him completely! However, one, if so inclined, can argue that the Revolutionary War, especially in the context of the icons of the Revolutionary War, was a war fought not for strongly held COMMUNAL principles but for power and greed. Many of the figures of the Revolutionary War were selfish individuals concerned with their own power struggle, rather than the struggle between the colonists and the crown. Furthermore, the end consequence of the War was an acknowledgment that anarchy, fueled with “weapons of mass destruction” (in those days, pitch forks and canon balls) trumps political dissent. And, as a brief aside, has Professor Brophy forgotten that numerous “gods” of the Revolutionary War used their slaves to fulfill their every sexual craving? Such a pessimistic viewpoint of the Revolutionary War does injustice to those who fought for their strongly held beliefs. (Albeit, slavery, British Aggression, economics, power, greed, etc.) Are we now to say that any vestige of the Revolutionary War be striken from the rolls of history? I think not! Each historical moment should be placed in context!

    I believe the only difference with those that revere the Civil War and those that revere the Revolutionary War is a geographical boundary. Those from the Northern states tend to view the Revolutionary War as their place in history (even if their ancestors were possibly slave owners). However, the Southerners cannot relate to such reverance. Southerners must support a history with that which they can see themselves and their ancestors – The Civil War (even if their ancestors were possibly slave-owners)

  4. Mike Hill says:

    Professor Brophy’s insight into the Virginia Legislature’s love for historical cemetaries, specifically that of the Civil War, is quite compelling. However, the Civil War, itself, is a historical byproduct. The funding attributed to the upkeep of the cemetary, in a less pessimistic view, is more of a contribution to history, not a contribution to a particular viewpoint (i.e. slavery). The only agreement that surfaces from Civil War historians is that many good able bodied men sacrified their lives for their strongly held beliefs. (Albeit, slavery, economics, Northern Aggression, federalism, etc.) For this and only this reason should the Virginia legislature continue to fund the Civil War cemetaries.

    Additionally, Professor Brophy supports the funding of the Revolutionary War Cemetaries for the just reason that we ought to remember our ancestors. Bravo! I agree with him completely! However, one, if so inclined, can argue that the Revolutionary War, especially in the context of the icons of the Revolutionary War, was a war fought not for strongly held COMMUNAL principles but for power and greed. Many of the figures of the Revolutionary War were selfish individuals concerned with their own power struggle, rather than the struggle between the colonists and the crown. Furthermore, the end consequence of the War was an acknowledgment that anarchy, fueled with “weapons of mass destruction” (in those days, pitch forks and canon balls) trumps political dissent. And, as a brief aside, has Professor Brophy forgotten that numerous “gods” of the Revolutionary War used their slaves to fulfill their every sexual craving? Such a pessimistic viewpoint of the Revolutionary War does injustice to those who fought for their strongly held beliefs. (Albeit, slavery, British Aggression, economics, power, greed, etc.) Are we now to say that any vestige of the Revolutionary War be striken from the rolls of history? I think not! Each historical moment should be placed in context!

    I believe the only difference with those that revere the Civil War and those that revere the Revolutionary War is a geographical boundary. Those from the Northern states tend to view the Revolutionary War as their place in history (even if their ancestors were possibly slave owners). However, the Southerners cannot relate to such reverance. Southerners must support a history with that which they can see themselves and their ancestors – The Civil War (even if their ancestors were possibly slave-owners)